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Thread: saddle height?

  1. #1
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    saddle height?

    When I was a kid and got fitted for a mountain bike I remember them having me put the saddle up to a height where my leg was straight at the bottom of the down stroke. since then i have always set my height the same way but after hearing some comments about saddle height I wonder if that is the correct way to set the height for off road or if that was for general on road use. I know this maximizes power but I am wondering if it compromises something else equally on the trail?
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  2. #2
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    Not straight but almot. It should have a slight bend in your knees.

  3. #3
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    i use the heel method....if your heel in on the pedal, when the crank arm is in line with the seat tube, my foot is fully extended....remember....THE HEEL of your foot, not the ball....

    Once you have it so you leg is fully extended, once you move the ball of your foot in the right position, your knee should be slightly bent, NOT fully extended.

  4. #4
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    Never know what's enough until you've experienced too much. Just play around with it a little and raise it a little bit at a time and see what's comfy. But generally, your knee should be bent a little. Just make sure you pay attention to the guidlines on the tube. If you raise the seat past the max lines.... well... that's bad. It can damage you and damage the frame.

  5. #5
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    thanks guys, I am probably about there as I never like to have my knee locked but I wasnt sure if maybe i was a bit too high....
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  6. #6
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    nvr2low> nice pics

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9 View Post
    nvr2low> nice pics
    thanks!
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  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Experiment with it.

    For a rider who likes high cadence and uses clipless pedals, a little lower saddle may often work better. For someone who pedals push-push, with a lot of power in each stroke and a low cadence, a higher saddle works better. Mountain bikers seem especially prone to what seem to me to be weird attitudes about saddle heights because a lot of us like to drop the saddle extra low for technical sections and descents. I think this implies that putting it extra high is good for climbs, which I think is totally off-base. Of course, saddle height's pretty subjective. So, experiment with it.
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  9. #9
    Ride or die
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    Quote Originally Posted by HighLife420 View Post
    i use the heel method....if your heel in on the pedal, when the crank arm is in line with the seat tube, my foot is fully extended....remember....THE HEEL of your foot, not the ball....

    Once you have it so you leg is fully extended, once you move the ball of your foot in the right position, your knee should be slightly bent, NOT fully extended.
    +1 for this method

  10. #10
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    I've only been riding about 7 weeks now.

    When i first got my bike i actually cut down my seat post to lower my seat. The more and more I've riden i've slowly moved my seat post up, to exactly where it was when i got it! some of it had to do with my body needing to get used to riding (sore butt ((biking shorts really help)) ), some of it had to do with my gut getting in the way (lost 15lbs and 2 belt notches already).

    Where I'm at not is my knee almost forms a 90 degree angle when it crests and is almost straight (not quite, but close) when it is at full extension. If my knee is a more acute angle when it crests, meaning my saddle is lower, i feel that i have a lot less power and stamina, despite working harder for it.

    I anticipate this changing over time and based on terrain somewhat considering my saddle has moved over 3'' since i started riding.

    Not sure if this is helpful at all, as I said i'm still new, but I was really surprised at this.

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