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Thread: Saddle height

  1. #1
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    Saddle height

    Is saddle height more of a preference?? Ive seen pics with saddle up and pics with saddle lowered. Whats the advantages and disadvantage of one over the other? Ive tried both ways and seem more comfortable with it lower but takes more effort to get off the saddle when in a low position.
    Thanks,
    John

  2. #2
    AZ
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    Seat height can be fairly critical , heres a link to get you started :

    http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkkEGxf...m/saddles.html

    Getting it right can increase power and decrease the likelyhood of injury . Good luck .

  3. #3
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    That is no "correct" saddle height. It depends on the terrain and the type of riding you are doing. That's why telescoping seat posts are gaining popularity on all-mountain bikes. If you're riding smooth trails or climbing on a fireroad you probably want your saddle higher to get the most leverage out of your legs. However on an undulating trail you want it lower to keep from being bucked around on the saddle and also lowering your center of gravity which tends to give you more control. Your saddle is probably in it's lowest position when either riding stunts or on extended downhill sections. Most dowh hillers actuallly spend very little time on their seat, choosing stay balance on their pedals to both lower the center of gravity on the bike and allowing them to quickly shift their weight.
    Experiment a little and find what you like. Sometimes just moving your seat 1/8" either up or down will feel better, while dropping it 1/2 to 1" on a downhill will make you feel in better control.

  4. #4
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    You set it to where it's optimum height and mark it, then get the quick release seat clamp. Then you can put it where you set it on the climb, at the top drop them easily. If the trail is up and down I guess you just have to keep the seat height up. There's no compromise on the height when you are climbing. It's either it's efficient or it's not.

    Lower the seat height help you move around the bike, on the down hill, it's easier to get to the back of the bike.

  5. #5
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    I remember, way back in the day, I had something called a "Hite-Rite" on my bike--it was a spring that attached to the seat tube clamp and also to the seat post. You;d set it with the post at the correct height, then while riding you could reach down and release your seat tube clamp, sit on the saddle to force it down, then tighten the clamp...later, you could release the clamp again and stand on the pedals, and the Hite-Rite spring would return the seat to its original height. Kinda of a nifty item, but...well, I never did put it on the bike I got in 1994, I found that I could ride downhill effectively enough with the seat up as long as I stuck my butt off the back of the seat.

    I haven't seen a Hite-Rite on a bike for...well, since I stopped using mine in the early 90s. I dunno if there's any thing like that on the market any more (hmmm...maybe the original is still around...)

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