1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Get your popcorn ready!
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    Jun 2008
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    23

    Rust on Chain Normal?

    Howdy all,

    I left my new rockhopper disc out during the begining of a thunderstorm, I got to it within minutes and then wiped it dry inside my house. I forgot to wipe the chain and I noticed a little orange rust looking color on it, is this normal? How often are chains replaced?

  2. #2
    guy who bikes
    Reputation: pedal_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    39
    hey, i work in a shop and see lots of varying levels of rust on chains. obviously it's not ideal and should be avoided with regular lubing, but chain wear is more important. if it's new then don;t bother replacing the chain until it's stretched (check this with a chain wear tool). do replace the chain if the rust is bad enough that any of the links become frozen (check this by moving each link by hand) or if you notice that the shifting is sloppier (but this can also be due to normal "cable stretch" so try adjusting the cable tension first). hope this helps.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    11,811
    Keep your chain lubricated. That should keep it from rusting.

    Chains are replaced when they stretch too much.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Yup it's normal...

    steel chanis rust very quickly when they get wet if they aren't properly lubed. A little orange rust isn't a big deal. Just lube the chain and then wipe the excess off with a dry rag. It's likely that the corrosion will wipe right off. When you get into trouble is when the corrosion gets heavy enough to freeze links as mentioned earlier. Do your best to not leave the bike out in rain storms. If you get caught in one or ride somewhere that is wet or muddy make the chain the first bit of maintenance that you do when you get home. I work in a shop too and also see every thing from a little bit of orange rust to chains that are completely locked up. I had one in last week that was so corroded that I had to hit a pin with liquid wrench and let it sit for a half hour before I could even break the chain to remove it and install a new one. That's pretty bad!

    Anyway, just clean it, dry it, and lube it after every wet encounter and you'll be fine.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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