1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    121

    Road/commuter bike

    I am looking to add a road type bike to the stable. I am looking at a budget of $700-1000.00. If any one has any recommendations I would appreciate it. I will be riding around the city and also hopefully to work eventually.

    Sent from my SCH-R760 using Tapatalk 2

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BeginnerCycling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,396
    This one comes ready to commute with lights, fenders, etc.:
    Breezer Liberty
    I ride at night - see my tips for Night Cycling
    My Blog: Cycling For Beginners

  3. #3
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    712
    I have a Kona Dew for my urban / asphalt bike. It works pretty well. Flat bars. 700C rims with relatively wide tires. Flat black frame.

    Your local bike shop very likely has something similar. It's a road bike with no pretensions of being a road racing bike. No carbon. No drop handlebars. Plenty of attachment points for fenders and luggage racks.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    471
    I'm sure a lot of folks, here, have suggestions but the question is somewhat broad. Perhaps you could be more specific.

    How long is your commute?
    Do you want fenders?
    Do you want a rack? Panniers?
    Do you live in a hilly city or flat community?
    How are the roads?
    Lightweight or bombproof?
    Drivetrain preference?
    Flat bar or drops?
    Wheel size?
    Geometry?
    Suspension?
    Did you want something you could take on the trail?
    All weather? What's the climate like where you live?

    You may want to peruse the Trek city bikes for ideas ... to help detemine what you do or don't want in a road bike.

    Urban Utility
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,703
    Trek FX series with disc brakes work. 7..3 is fine or used back to 2005 FX 7300 disc which I have. I threw on a cheap Rock shock for $20 used.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by joeinchi View Post
    I'm sure a lot of folks, here, have suggestions but the question is somewhat broad. Perhaps you could be more specific.

    How long is your commute? To work it says 10 miles
    Do you want fenders? Probably not
    Do you want a rack? Ill probably just use my large back pack Panniers? ???? Don't know what that is.
    Do you live in a hilly city or flat community? I'm in a small village. Good bike paths and roads are good to decent
    How are the roads?
    Lightweight or bombproof? Mix
    Drivetrain preference? Hadn't thought that far yet.
    Flat bar or drops? Maybe drops
    Wheel size? ????
    Geometry? ??????
    Suspension? Probably not but would consider.
    Did you want something you could take on the trail? No I've got mountain for that.
    All weather? I'd say decent riding weather 6-7 months of year then bitter cold and possible snow. What's the climate like where you live?

    You may want to peruse the Trek city bikes for ideas ... to help detemine what you do or don't want in a road bike.

    Urban Utility


    Sent from my SCH-R760 using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
    Big wheels small brain
    Reputation: MattC555's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    255
    I picked up an 80's steel frame 10 speed. Really nice bikes with full Shimano drivetrains can be had for next to nothing.

    Here is a link to the bike I bought: LOTUS BICYCLES

    My bike is the '87 Challenger SX thats listed about a third of the way down the page. Rides like a dream for $75.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    471
    Oh, so you want a true road bike (as opposed to a hybrid or street-ready mtb) with drop bars, 700c wheels, sturdy but lighweight. In terms of geometry, you probably want something which allows you to sit a little more upright than a racing bike and you don't need the racks or panniers (saddle bags) of a touring bike.

    A nice option in your price range is the Specialized Secteur Sport Compact. It features a relatively relaxed geometry, carbon fork, Shimano Sora 9-spd drivetrain with "compact" double chain rings and weighs around 20 lbs.

    Secteur Sport Compact

    What othe brands are sold in your area? You'll want to test ride and have the shop dial in a proper fit, so you may want to limit your search to those brands which are readily available.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    121
    I was kind of looking at the trek 1.1. It is at the low end of my range and I already have a trek mountain bike that has served me well so far. We also have 4 trek dealers in town.

    Sent from my SCH-R760 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    471
    Yep, Trek 1 series is similar to the Secteur. It all comes down to fit and whether you have a preference for certain components.

    The brifters (combination brake and shifters) are a real issue for some riders. Tiagra shifters are integrated with the brake lever while the Sora's shifters straddle the hoods. If you anticipae spending most of your time on the hoods, it shouldn't be an issue.

    If you can find a Felt or Jamis dealer, you might be able to find a bike equipped with higher-end components for the same price of the entry-level Trek/Specialized bikes. And if you have Craigslist in your area, you can often find smoking deals on very well-equipped road bikes.

    First step is to figure out what size you need and then start shopping.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    23
    Giant Escape 0 or Giant Escape City

    Both would be very good for what you're looking for.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    121
    Ok so the wife just put big gaping hole in my plans for another bike in the stable. I guess a carrier for a little one is going to be on the next bigger purchase list. I appreciate everyone's input.

    I guess I will have to decide what to do to me Trek 4900 to make it more commuter friendly for me then.
    I already have Bontrager t1 tires on for better road riding.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    471
    Too bad.

    Quote Originally Posted by scribble79 View Post
    I guess I will have to decide what to do to me Trek 4900 to make it more commuter friendly for me then.
    I already have Bontrager t1 tires on for better road riding.
    Hmmm. Interesting question. If your lockout works and you have fast tires, then it's all about safety and comfort.

    You could experiment with tire pressures. On pavement, you don't need rock hard tires to minimize rolling resistance. High psi not only delivers a harsher ride but makes your tires more prone to puncture flats. For a 1-3/8" wide tire, I would say 50-60 psi would give the best combination of comfort, speed and puncture resistance.

    Since you're often locked in the saddle while commuting, I'd take a fresh look at all riding position and comfort issue. How do your hands, feet, neck, arms, knees, etc. feel after a long ride? Make sure saddle height and cockpit length are dialed in. Try some ergo grips if your hands go numb. Different stem, etc.

    As the days shorten, visibility becomes a bigger safety issue. If your bike is not so-equipped, make sure you've got a light on the front and rear. The flashing type make it a lot easier for motorist to spot you. Reflectors on bike, wheels, pedals, helmet and clothing are probably good ideas, as well.

    Have fun.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •