1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    riding in the rain

    is this a bsd idea for the bike

  2. #2
    don't move for trees
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    You have to consider a couple things. First of all, is riding in the rain any different then washing it with water? Second is, how much time do you want to spend cleaning it. As the trail gets muddier, your bike gets muddier and it goes into new places that are harder to clean. All this mud is also hard on parts and can make for tricky riding. My advice, try it once, if you like it and don't mind the clean up, then go for it.

    Just rember this though, with rain and mud trails will be mushy and the impact your tire has is greatly magnified, so tread carefuly
    "Get a bicycle.You will not regret it if you live." Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
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    Yes, riding in the rain is possible...I do it in my commuting from time to time. That being said, you'll pick up a lot of grime. You will want to clean and lube your chain more often and as BK indicated, mud is a bit more of an issue for cleaning.

    If you're game, give it a go....but if you like trails, stay off them when wet.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  4. #4
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    Unless they are rocky and gravelly...

  5. #5
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    Plus when your bike is caked with mud it's heavier

  6. #6
    my fun has a hurting
    Reputation: cdburch's Avatar
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    off road bikes are like 4 wheelers. they look better covered in mud.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdburch
    off road bikes are like 4 wheelers. they look better covered in mud.
    agreed

  8. #8
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    I would stay away from difficult trails in wet and rainy conditions. Trying to get over logs and rocks is much more difficult, as your front tire seems to just slip off the obstacles. Riding in the rain should be no big deal for the bike though. Just clean it afterward and you're all good to go.

  9. #9
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    Please always remember to only ride in mud if you absolutely have to.

  10. #10
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Exactly....mud (esp. on your fave singletrack) isn't a good thing. And besides, leaving big tracks in the mud fuels the "close the trails" / "protect the trails from mtb erosion" whackjobs out there.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  11. #11
    my fun has a hurting
    Reputation: cdburch's Avatar
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    guys guys i wasnt supporting bogging through the trails when they are too wet to ride! i was more talking about those couple of mud holes that never seem to dry up (at least in this part of the northeast...) and creek crossing/loose dirt combo mud. sorry if i gave the wrong impression.

  12. #12
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Cool beans. I don't know the trails you ride, but locally, the lows are generally taken care of by some trail maintenance or by the slope towards the river

    As for crossings, try to stick to the common line I find that they are usually the best packed areas of the streambank and will give the best traction while being the least disruptive
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  13. #13
    my fun has a hurting
    Reputation: cdburch's Avatar
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    yeah i always take the line straight through NEVER around. if you are afraid of getting wet or dirty this isnt the sport for you. summer in the north east = humid as all hell which means some of the rollers in low areas (at least around here) never dry out. there are some low lying super loamy trails that we have to wait up to 2 weeks to ride after a couple days of rain. of course the equestrians who are always screaming at us about erosion and destroying the trails are usually out as soon as the rain stops...

  14. #14
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    Rain/ water allows dirt/grime/ etc to enter parts of your chain easier than in dry conditions. This is normal in everyday riding but water accelerates this in the deterioration of your chain.

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