1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
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  1. #1
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    Riding over logs

    was riding on a trail cathedral pines on my second ride, there were a few log obstacles in the course. How would I go about riding over them without busting my head? It seems when I get my front wheel over I just lose it and almost fall, any tricks to this? id really prefer going straight over the logs instead of having to go around them constantly. -_-

  2. #2
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    Probably not what you want to hear, but the best way over them is by air. You need to learn to bunny hop. Its fairly easy once you learn how, I won't rewrite whats written in a couple places on this forum already. But basicaly pull up hard on the handlebars so you pop a wheely and then push straight forward on them. I think there are some videos somewhere on the forum, I'll try and find them and link them for you

  3. #3
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    I would pick up more speed, lean back, loft the front wheel so that it barely clears the log or just hits the top of it and use your momentum to continue over the log. Once your front wheel makes it over the log and touches the ground then lean back. or just bunny hop it!! ( that is where clip in pedals come in handy)

    If you are not comfortable with the above methods than you can approach the log at a slow speed at an angle, take your foot that is the closest to the log off the pedal and plant it ontop of the log and lift your bike over. You kind of half stay on the bike and it is smoother than getting off the bike completely and looks better.
    98% of roadies don't say hi to other bike riders. If you are in the 2% range copy and paste this into your signature

  4. #4
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    The BH tutorial video is stickied at the top of the Beginners corner
    Darn another Root...Pedal, pedal, pedal.....

  5. #5
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    After a shoulder injury, I have a hard time pulling up on my bike to bunny hop. I just approach the log and do my best to roll over it, otherwise I use aardvarkmagic's method.

  6. #6
    Bikecurious
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    I made a similar post a month or so ago. There may be some helpful info on it: Its log, its log, its big, its heavy, its wood.....
    I've found that just keeping up your momentum and committing will go a long ways.
    Howdy Doody's past the House of Aquarius

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by emtnate
    After a shoulder injury, I have a hard time pulling up on my bike to bunny hop. I just approach the log and do my best to roll over it, otherwise I use aardvarkmagic's method.
    funny you should say that. I also recently injured my shoulder through boxing ( fractured/hill-sachs disorder that causes me to dislocate) and I have trouble pulling up on the bike without some pain. But I'll just step on to it and roll. thanks

  8. #8
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    I'm a looser... just ride up at moderate speed pop the wheel up on top or over the wheel and let the rear pop over while i pedal over it... doing as lightly as possible with my 300# self haha... rode a new trail the other day though and just walked over a few of em... wasn't carrying enough momentum to get over em (new trail + very leasurly riding)... may just try hopping up on curbs... which seems to be about right for the (much) smaller logs...

    mark
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  9. #9
    jalopy jockey
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    Get the front light/lifted once that clears push forward to get the front down and lighten up the rear once that clears bring some weight into it to bring the back back down.

    Bunnyhops work great for the smaller logs, but not the monster logpiles. you'd have to be super human or at least close to bunnyhop some piles 3 foot tree falls on the trail. Stack some branches around it and have some fun. Most people are not gonna bunnyhop that. My wife is not going to bunnyhop the 6incher that I regularly do on our home trail.

    we both use the weighting unweighting technique me juns on a grander scale.

  10. #10
    ride the moment
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    Here's how I learned. Still working on making it look like they do!

    http://www.adksportsfitness.com/apri...lumns/mtb.html
    Just because you read a book it don't make you conscious. - MC Lush

  11. #11
    Rod
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    it depends on the size of the log, but I usually pop a wheelie over the smaller logs and when the back tire approaches I just lift it up with my pedals. With practice this can be really smooth and fast. If there's a log ramp I just launch over the log.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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