1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Riding asphalt

  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Riding asphalt

    Quick question.. When I want to go for a quick ride in nearby trails.. I have to first ride on about 4-5 km of asphalt.. Is this going to do a significant amount of damage to my tires?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    It depends on the tire. What are you riding?

  3. #3
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    I am riding a 'Schwalbe Nobby Nic'..

    Schwalbe Nobby Nic Tire Reviews

  4. #4
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    No. If you want to carry a pump you can run them at 40psi and air down for a trail ride. If it is super hot maybe ride on the shoulder.

  5. #5
    Just Ride
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    I live about 3-4 miles from the nearest trail. An easy ride to get there to be sure. But I'd rather not put excess wear on my tires. They are way to expensive to waste riding on the road.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  6. #6
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    The smoother the center of the tire the less damage will be done.

  7. #7
    Jonesin'
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    Riding off-road tires on pavement is the fastest way to wear them out. Problem is, how can it be helped? You need to get to the trails and driving to them will cost gas and wear and tear on your car, so that will cost some money too.

    Airing them up to the max psi for the asphalt part of the ride is about all you can do.
    Never be the path of least resistance.

    "You picked a fine time to leave me loose wheel." -Simply Weasels

  8. #8
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    It depends on the tire for sure, and bringing the psi up to max for road and down to where you like it for trail will help too. Aside from that I'd say since you're riding to the trail just get us whatever tire you like for trail and don't sweat it. Maybe it'll cost you 25 cents a ride, maybe 26 if you don't raise the psi, lol.
    If you're riding more like dirt roads than trails than maybe a cross tire with less or no treads in the center would be better.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  9. #9
    Jonesin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    ... just get us whatever tire you like
    I like where your head is at right here, if I'm included in the "us", lol.
    Never be the path of least resistance.

    "You picked a fine time to leave me loose wheel." -Simply Weasels

  10. #10
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    I just ordered a CrossMark for my rear tire as I'm in the same boat as you. The circuit I run is 50/50 paved trail/single track dirt.
    I wore a Rapid Rob bald in the centre line in 6 weeks from new. Keeping a full trail tire on the front however.

  11. #11
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    Awesome, thanks for all the good advice.

  12. #12
    Trailhead Poseur
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    I have about 3.5km of pavement from my door to one end of my home trail, I ride it and not worry about tire wear because I'd still be burning gas to drive there anyway. It's also more convenient and probably faster for me to ride there than to load the bike into the car, drive, and unload at the other end.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  13. #13
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Pavement does wear down tires like that fairly quickly, but what are you going to do? Most things that make a tire good on dirt makes it wear on pavement.

    A few km are not going to kill them super fast.

    So yeah, they will wear more quickly, but I would not change the tires or skip the ride over it.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by OllieQ View Post
    QI have to first ride on about 4-5 km of asphalt.. Is this going to do a significant amount of damage to my tires?
    Short answer:
    No. Don't worry about it.

    Long answer:
    Read all the other comments, and then make an equation about the differents approaches to reaching the trails - and their cost in money, time, work, worry, etc.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  15. #15
    Super Clyde
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    Honestly? You will probably "pay" more in wear and tear to your car. Starting your car and driving your car short distances is very hard on the engine and other components. The biggest one being moisture. If you only run it a few KM there won't be enough time for it to evaporate. You will have moisture in your oil, and moisture in your exhaust causing it to rust faster.

  16. #16
    Cow Clicker
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    I say do it until the tire is unacceptable on the trail (you're constantly spinning out on climbs) and then make a decision as to whether it is worth it to replace with the same tire, or, switch to something like a SB8 or Renegade in the rear.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  17. #17
    T.W.O.
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    Yes it would wear faster than you drive to the trail, but who cares. It would not be significant but it's more wear for sure. That said, I would not give it second thoughts if it's a cheap(er) tire say $30-40, but for a $65-80 each of NN depending on models it adds up fast especially on softer models. NN already wear faster than Kenda Nevegal, and it's about twice the price.

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