1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Replacing freewheel - new chain also?

    Is it okay to replace the freewheel without replacing the chain?

    I put a new freewheel on and I swear Im hearing/feeling some grinding. I only swapped the freewheel because I had it off servicing the axle bearings. I thought I might as well put the new one on I had bought for a spare.

    I used the old chain, which has probably less then 6 months worth of riding on it. I removed it and gave it a good cleaning and lubricating.

    Yes, it's an old 7 speed freewheel.
    Chris

    2005 Walmart Schwinn (slightly modified)
    Still going...

  2. #2
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    The freewheel goes over the axle, the cassette goes over the freewheel, the chain goes over the cassette... So, freewheel and chain are separated by the cassette (which has the 7 cogs).

    There is absolutely no need to replace the chain when you replace the freewheel. You don't have to replace the cassette either.

    You should check the chain when you replace the cassette, though. When the chain is worn you can indeed experience grinding. The old chain will wear the new cassette down rapidly. The age of the chain doesn't really matter. A chain wears out by stretching. The more you hammerfest (large gears, huge effort) the faster the chain wears.

    A bike shop has a ruler that tells you in 10 secs if your chain is worn. Otherwise you can measure yourself: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html (also a very good article on chains and sprockets/cassettes).
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  3. #3
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    Kaba, I think you are confusing a FreeHUB and a FreeWHEEL.

    NcBlue, If it's not skipping on you the chain should still be ok. Put it in the smallest cog and ride it hard and see if it skips. The grinding noise could be many things, check your derailleur alignment and make sure it's lined up properly. Hopefully you cleaned/lubed the chain properly.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mount Dora Cycles
    Kaba, I think you are confusing a FreeHUB and a FreeWHEEL.

    NcBlue, If it's not skipping on you the chain should still be ok. Put it in the smallest cog and ride it hard and see if it skips. The grinding noise could be many things, check your derailleur alignment and make sure it's lined up properly. Hopefully you cleaned/lubed the chain properly.
    Duh - my bad. Good catch Mout Dora Cycles!
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

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