1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New question here. replacing a frame

    The other day the frame on my fully rigid 98' GT bravado snapped. The nice people at GT have offered me a Avalance Expert frame at cost price so I think this may be a good option rather than trying to have the frame welded and it potentially failing again. It also means I get a much better and lighter Al frame.

    Is it possible to put my rigid forks on the avalnace frame or is the geometry all wrong? I use it for road riding with slicks, hence rigid forks. I would prefer to buy a true road bike but don't have a spare 600-700.

    How tricky a job is it to swap all the parts of the old frame onto a new one? Would it be easier just to get my local bike shop to do the job and save a lot of hassel? I am guessing there are a few special tools needed for the job. What parts are likely to be not compatible with the new frame? The current bike is a mix of 98' shimano LX and XT. I am also guessing that the front mech may not fit if the downtube is bigger.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: coldsteele's Avatar
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    If you are unsure what to do and how to do it I would strongly recommend taking it to a shop. There are some specific tools needed. There might be a problem with the fork steerer tube size which might mean a new fork and stem. Thats only if the current is not 1 1/8 inches and the new probably is. Also check the size of the seat tube. Other than that everything should fit.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldsteele
    If you are unsure what to do and how to do it I would strongly recommend taking it to a shop. There are some specific tools needed. There might be a problem with the fork steerer tube size which might mean a new fork and stem. Thats only if the current is not 1 1/8 inches and the new probably is. Also check the size of the seat tube. Other than that everything should fit.
    Things to check that may not switch over-
    -steerer tube on the old fork is too short (if the new frame has a taller/longer headtube)
    -also possible that the new frame takes a seatpost that is a different diameter (this will be stamped on the seatpost down low... something like 27.2, 28.6, 31.8)
    -front derailler clamp size may be different.
    Also, if the geometry of the new frame is different, you may end up wanting a different length &/or rise stem.

    That is cool that GT (now Pacific cycles?) is warrantying your frame, since GT's changed hands a bit over the years.

    it will be cheaper to have a bike shop change over the parts than to buy all the tools required (or close in cost), unless you plan on doing lots of bike work in the future.
    [SIZE=1][/SIZE]

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