1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    remove plastic chainring guard?

    my bike came with a plastic chainring guard, should I keep it on there till it breaks off probably, or remove it now?
    Last edited by Gabe3; 10-28-2010 at 08:07 PM.

  2. #2
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    If you're talking about the plastic ring behind the cassette on the rear wheel, yes...try to get it off. It will eventually break and cause issues at precisely the wrong time.
    01 GT iDrive...frame failure
    03 Trek Fuel 98...frame failure
    10 Santa Cruz Heckler...TBD

  3. #3
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    If you are talking about the plastic ring on the outside of the big front chainring, its not a chain guide, its there to stop long pants from hooking up on the sprocket teeth and can be got rid of no problem or it will break the first time it hits a log across a track

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sturge
    If you're talking about the plastic ring behind the cassette on the rear wheel, yes...try to get it off. It will eventually break and cause issues at precisely the wrong time.
    already removed that, what a pain in the ass it was.

    i'm talking about this:


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffgre_6163
    If you are talking about the plastic ring on the outside of the big front chainring, its not a chain guide, its there to stop long pants from hooking up on the sprocket teeth and can be got rid of no problem or it will break the first time it hits a log across a track
    I mean guard, not guide, sorry.

  6. #6
    usually cranky
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    i would but you dont have to.

  7. #7
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    i "removed" the plastic one on my bike with a rock on the trails a few days ago. lol.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sturge
    If you're talking about the plastic ring behind the cassette on the rear wheel, yes...try to get it off. It will eventually break and cause issues at precisely the wrong time.
    What damage do "dork disks" cause? I still have mine on, but it's starting to get loose.

  9. #9
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    Dork disc's make your bike look cheap, they aren't cool and they really serve no purpose.

  10. #10
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
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    I'd keep it until it breaks. It'll serve as a reminder to do better on that part of the trail that broke it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by William_Cannon
    What damage do "dork disks" cause? I still have mine on, but it's starting to get loose.
    it can break off and get stuck in the spokes, moving wheel+something in spokes=bad outcome.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by burger49
    Dork disc's make your bike look cheap, they aren't cool and they really serve no purpose.
    so if your chain goes over low gear and towards your wheel, the dork disc doesn't protect the spokes at all?

  13. #13
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    The one on the rear cassette is just bad compensation for a poorly adjusted drivetrain. If everything is set up properly, it isn't needed.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtemple
    The one on the rear cassette is just bad compensation for a poorly adjusted drivetrain. If everything is set up properly, it isn't needed.
    Agreed, but all it takes is a fall to get your derailleur out of whack on the trail.

  15. #15
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    Please remove it. It will be one less piece of trash someone has to pick up.

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