1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
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    Recumbent Exercise Bike vs Upright Exercise Bike

    The gym at my townhome clubhouse has a recumbent exercise bike only and the city Recreation Center has upright exercise bikes, as well as recumbent bikes.

    I prefer the upright bike because it's most similar to riding a regular bike, but all of the bikes were taken yesterday at the Recreation Center so I hopped on a recumbent bike for the first time. It was a little bit of an odd experience, but seemed like it was working a lot of the same muscles as an upright bike.

    So the question I have is if there is a major difference in the muscles exercised or overall workout with a recumbent bike vs an upright one? If it's fairly similar, I could see myself using the clubhouse recumbent bike more because it is so close. I've just avoided them because they look goofy.

  2. #2
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    The biggest difference is cals per hour.

    That being said if it is your only choice it is better then nothing.

  3. #3
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    I tried a recumbent bike for the first time today after having been using the upright for a while. Given they look weird and I am hoping to improve my actual cycling fitness- I do plan to use them along with the upright because they put a little more emphasis on the hamstrings/glutes, and lower abdominal muscles.

    However, I did not notice any difference in calories/hr as austanian noted. I'm just looking to change it up a little.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the reply. I'll just have to try it a bit longer and see how it compares. Only a couple of months longer and then it will be warm enough to be riding outside anyway!

  5. #5
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    If you want to get the closest experience to riding, how about a trainer? Also, If your rec center offers a spin class, I suggest you try it, too. I participated in my first one last night at the gym; a lot of the folks in the class used their clip in bike shoes and had on bike shorts; obviously cyclists trying to stay in shape.

  6. #6
    T.W.O.
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    For cardio either one is ok, for cycling specific I'd agree with bradktn on spin class. Find the full class it's much better than spinning alone.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    My team helped pay for the founding of a computrainer center several years ago. While it's not exclusive to our team, it's basically teammates who I see there. Anyway, I've been going for the last several weeks, since the weather sucks and I'm busy and not hugely motivated lately. Definitely better to suffer with others. Especially if you can bring your own bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    I called the Recreation Center and found some times I could go to try out a spinning class. I'm not that hardcore into training in the off-season, just trying to get on a bike when it works out, but the spinning class sounds interesting.

  9. #9
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    I doubt a recumbent will do anything for training. It's really a different animal. Spinning on the other hand should work very well.
    He who dares....wins!

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