1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
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    Rebuild fork or buy a new one?

    I inherited a '99 Trek 7000 zx from my brother and after a couple years of limited biking and storing it in the back of the garage, I've started to bike a lot more. I am planning on buying a decent full suspension within a year, but right now I want to clean up/tune up my hardtail. The fork is a RST mozo that's in pretty bad condition (about 40mm of travel) and I was wondering if it's possible to save the fork by sending it to a shop to clean it out and rebuild it. Or would it be smarter/cheaper just to buy a cheap but solid fork like the Marzocchi MZ super comp?

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
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    rst forks are almost always not worth the beans to rebuild them. they are... ahem, "disposable". besides finding parts i bet will be a little tricky. i think an entry level fork from a major manufacturer will be better.

  3. #3
    No good in rock gardens..
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    It could be just a case of the elastomers being trashed - they go hard and / or fall to bits after a few years. If I recall the Mozo likely had a coil spring and elastomer stack inside - the coil will likely be OK. You may find the LBS could have a number of old fork springs laying around that you might be able to use to keep it running for another year until you get your new bike. It's likely any 7/8" spring will just drop right in. I wouldn't spend too much money on it however.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  4. #4
    SSolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by bschanz
    rst forks are almost always not worth the beans to rebuild them. they are... ahem, "disposable". besides finding parts i bet will be a little tricky. i think an entry level fork from a major manufacturer will be better.
    Disposable fork. Sideknob's suggestion is goood but definitely don't spend much on it.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  5. #5
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead!

    thanks for input guys. i think im just going to buy a fork because i get the feeling that even if i manage to find the right parts, it wont perform as well as a newer one. should i buy a used fork? im always a bit hesitant about buying used things, but i would probably get a better quality fork used for my money. the other option is buying a new fork on the lower price range. either way spend less than $200. suggestions as to what i do?

  6. #6
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    Used is risky. Not sure there is a market for lowend forks. If you are patient you might be able to pick up a new fork for cheap at the usual internet retailers (e.g. jensonUSA, wheelworld, CBO, pricepoint, Greenfishsports, bluescycycling).

    Biggest issue will be making sure you'll get a fork that fits and the actual installation.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  7. #7
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    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/138-Forks.aspx

    try this site. three good entry level forks for less than $200.00. I have a dart 3 and although i am not crazy about it, it will suffice for the time being. there is a tora, which is better than the dart, for a little more. just be sure your bike has a threadless headset. if so, you should be good to go. if it has a threaded headset then you need to get a headset too.

    the rst fork is a good one to beat the crap out of and then ditch when you are ready.

    ben

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