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  1. #1
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    Rebuild fork or buy a new one?

    I inherited a '99 Trek 7000 zx from my brother and after a couple years of limited biking and storing it in the back of the garage, I've started to bike a lot more. I am planning on buying a decent full suspension within a year, but right now I want to clean up/tune up my hardtail. The fork is a RST mozo that's in pretty bad condition (about 40mm of travel) and I was wondering if it's possible to save the fork by sending it to a shop to clean it out and rebuild it. Or would it be smarter/cheaper just to buy a cheap but solid fork like the Marzocchi MZ super comp?

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
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    rst forks are almost always not worth the beans to rebuild them. they are... ahem, "disposable". besides finding parts i bet will be a little tricky. i think an entry level fork from a major manufacturer will be better.

  3. #3
    No good in rock gardens..
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    It could be just a case of the elastomers being trashed - they go hard and / or fall to bits after a few years. If I recall the Mozo likely had a coil spring and elastomer stack inside - the coil will likely be OK. You may find the LBS could have a number of old fork springs laying around that you might be able to use to keep it running for another year until you get your new bike. It's likely any 7/8" spring will just drop right in. I wouldn't spend too much money on it however.
    Less isn't MOAR

  4. #4
    SSolo, on your left!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bschanz
    rst forks are almost always not worth the beans to rebuild them. they are... ahem, "disposable". besides finding parts i bet will be a little tricky. i think an entry level fork from a major manufacturer will be better.
    Disposable fork. Sideknob's suggestion is goood but definitely don't spend much on it.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  5. #5
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead!

    thanks for input guys. i think im just going to buy a fork because i get the feeling that even if i manage to find the right parts, it wont perform as well as a newer one. should i buy a used fork? im always a bit hesitant about buying used things, but i would probably get a better quality fork used for my money. the other option is buying a new fork on the lower price range. either way spend less than $200. suggestions as to what i do?

  6. #6
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    Used is risky. Not sure there is a market for lowend forks. If you are patient you might be able to pick up a new fork for cheap at the usual internet retailers (e.g. jensonUSA, wheelworld, CBO, pricepoint, Greenfishsports, bluescycycling).

    Biggest issue will be making sure you'll get a fork that fits and the actual installation.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  7. #7
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    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/138-Forks.aspx

    try this site. three good entry level forks for less than $200.00. I have a dart 3 and although i am not crazy about it, it will suffice for the time being. there is a tora, which is better than the dart, for a little more. just be sure your bike has a threadless headset. if so, you should be good to go. if it has a threaded headset then you need to get a headset too.

    the rst fork is a good one to beat the crap out of and then ditch when you are ready.

    ben

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