Results 1 to 50 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074

    questions about stem selection

    I want to upgrade to a shorter stem. How much twitchier will a 70mm stem be over a 110 stock stem? Can someone elaborate on angles too? Is it better to have an upward angle or straight? I am looking for a more responsive steering and to shift my weight rearward a tad.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    296
    a shorter stem will reduce the radius of the handle bar travel, by 30mm it really won't be too noticeable at normal speed, however at low/ tight corners might give you better control, at fast/ down hill might be too responsive. Depending on ur type of riding u might have to try a couple, stem too long might over work ur back, too short your arms and shoulder will suffer, u need to aim for a good overall balance. trying to fix bike handling gravitates more towards the bikes geometry. Stem angle is used for comfort and weight distribution, a high up degree angle makes u more upright taking some weight of the front tire, lower the degree of the stem will give more drop on the upper body and more weight on the front tire. if ur on the experimenting stage get a cheap adjustable stem to try different setups then when ur happy with it get the one u want, 1cm might not affect handling but it might be spot on for comfort.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,732
    Angle should be to put the bars at the height that you want your hands. Flatter tends to be more toward cross country/racing. There isn't a way to tell how much twitchier it would be ,the only way for you to know is to try it. With a shorter stem,people go with wider bars.That makes the reach about the same.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Quote Originally Posted by joel787 View Post
    a shorter stem will reduce the radius of the handle bar travel, by 30mm it really won't be too noticeable at normal speed, however at low/ tight corners might give you better control, at fast/ down hill might be too responsive. Depending on ur type of riding u might have to try a couple, stem too long might over work ur back, too short your arms and shoulder will suffer, u need to aim for a good overall balance. trying to fix bike handling gravitates more towards the bikes geometry. Stem angle is used for comfort and weight distribution, a high up degree angle makes u more upright taking some weight of the front tire, lower the degree of the stem will give more drop on the upper body and more weight on the front tire. if ur on the experimenting stage get a cheap adjustable stem to try different setups then when ur happy with it get the one u want, 1cm might not affect handling but it might be spot on for comfort.
    I am more of a trail rider. I do dream of doing some crazy stuff like downhill and jumps ect but with the type of riding I have available around me plus my skill level it is mainly riding through timber with some tight turns and rocks and tree roots. I am not sure I need a shorter stem but I am looking for basic upgrades to me entry level jamis that doesn't break the bank. I thought from what I had read a shorter stem would benefit me. Now you got me thinking. I already upgraded to better pedals. Looking for my next performance increase.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I am more of a trail rider. I do dream of doing some crazy stuff like downhill and jumps ect but with the type of riding I have available around me plus my skill level it is mainly riding through timber with some tight turns and rocks and tree roots. I am not sure I need a shorter stem but I am looking for basic upgrades to me entry level jamis that doesn't break the bank. I thought from what I had read a shorter stem would benefit me. Now you got me thinking. I already upgraded to better pedals. Looking for my next performance increase.
    The shorter stem will give you way more confidence going downhill....but you need to run it with wider bars if you don't already have them. Shorter stem and wider bars is the best upgrade you can make to improve handling IMO....there is a ton to read on the topic.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Haymarket View Post
    The shorter stem will give you way more confidence going downhill....but you need to run it with wider bars if you don't already have them. Shorter stem and wider bars is the best upgrade you can make to improve handling IMO....there is a ton to read on the topic.
    Is there a rule of thumb for handlebar width and stem length? I am interested in this upgrade. My jamis has a 620 mm handlebar length and either a 100-110 mm stem length now. How much should I increase handlebar length as I decrease stem length?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    296
    i don't think stems are really "performance", unless u want stability (short stem/ wide bars) or more responsiveness (short bar/ more drop). everything is a trade off, theres ways to change a bikes geometry, like angled head sets, longer forks. But if u don't know what u want it can be an expensive trial and error, it might work or it might be crap. demo as many bikes as u can, then when u look at a geo table u know what to look for and compare, to develop a sense of bike feeling. major difference now to ur bike would be a decent fork, or rims. But then again it might not be worth the money if at the end u still want a new bike.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    I just bought this bike 2 months ago lol.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    296
    ride it, get the stem see if u like it, if u ride a lot of up and down check a dropper seat post too, they have some cheap ones on ebay

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Is there a rule of thumb for handlebar width and stem length? I am interested in this upgrade. My jamis has a 620 mm handlebar length and either a 100-110 mm stem length now. How much should I increase handlebar length as I decrease stem length?
    BetterRide Mountain Bike Skills Tips

    50mm stems - improve handling or too short? | Bike Magic

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    111
    The 70mm stem will feel hugely different to your current setup. Do it, unless your frame is too small for you in the first place. Along with the wider bars, 620mm is way too narrow. 720mm is good for narrow shouldered riders, up to 780 if you're big. I ride 750s and they're ideal for me.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    I ended up ordering race face 725 mm handlebar set up and a race face 70 mm stem. I cannot wait to get them and put them on!!

  13. #13
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
    Reputation: Shayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,664
    Quote Originally Posted by AgrAde View Post
    Along with the wider bars, 620mm is way too narrow... for me.
    And 620mm is way too wide for me.
    Bar width, like pedal choice, and saddle choice are highly subjective.
    I'd never ride with my hands more than sholder width apart.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    111
    Yep, it's subjective and you're an XC rider - not meaning that all in offence. OP says that he's more of a trail rider, with aspirations of getting off the ground and riding some DH tracks. Seems he has different goals, and different requirements from his bike than the average XC rider. He's expressed concerns about stability, and wants to get a less nervous feeling front end.

    I've never met anyone who hasn't felt more confident after making the shift to wider bars, after looking for the results that OP is trying to attain. I don't know any "trail" riders that get in the air and ride DH tracks that feel they benefit from bars narrower than 680, including quite small women. Most small guys I know still like at least 720mm.

    I have for XC, that's fine, but it's not really what this thread is about.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    I moved to wider bars and a shorter stem a few seasons ago and can't complain. It was time to get with the times lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Bike geometry?
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Bike geometry? Who you asking?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    69/440mm? That's what I have anyways

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Bike geometry? Who you asking?
    I'm asking you since you are the OP. The geometry of the bike makes a huge difference.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    I have the 19" frame.


    SIZE 15" 17" 19" 21"
    CENTER of BB to TOP of TT 13.15/334 15.08/383 16.69/424 18.66/474
    ST ANGLE 72.5 72.5 72.5 72.5
    HEADTUBE 3.94/100 4.33/110 5.12/130 5.51/140
    HT ANGLE 70 70 70 70
    EFFECTIVE TT LENGTH 22.00/559 23.03/585 23.82/605 24.61/625
    FORK RAKE 1.65/42 1.65/42 1.65/42 1.65/42
    BB HEIGHT 12.12/308 12.12/308 12.12/308 12.12/308
    CHAINSTAY 17.12/435 17.12/435 17.12/435 17.12/435
    WHEELBASE 41.25/1048 42.32/1075 43.11/1095 43.94/1116
    STANDOVER 28.70/729 30.16/766 31.24/796 32.64/829

  21. #21
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Definitely XC geometry. Wide bars/short stem does not an AM bike make. I have tried this with several XC geo bikes, and each time the steering sucked. Standing up, my hands felt too far behind the front axle. This gave me the feeling of going OTB. I wasn't able to push my weight into the bars when riding over objects that tend to slow the bike down.

    Keep in mind, an XC bike in stock config (4 inch travel or less) will have a lower front end than a trail/AM bike in stock config (5 inch travel or more).

    questions about stem selection-102910saddlebars.jpg
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    That picture is very helpful actually. I just built an am bike and coming from an xc I was wondering why I didn't like the steering too much.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  23. #23
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    It's kinda hard to see in the pic but notice the silhouette of the DH/AM bikes top tube is higher and the head tube closer than the XC/Race bikes? To get your bars in the same place on an XC bike, you'll need a buttload of spacers, steep stem angle, or high rise bars. I think the wide bars on the slack bikes help get your weight back down to where it would normally be on an XC bike. The short stem puts your butt back where it is supposed to be since the wide bars draw the body forward.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Well I feel like an idiot. I cancelled my orders for my new stem and bars. I was worried about what dgw2jr said so I called and talked to Jamis themselves and they said for sure that would not be a good combo for this geometry. My trouble is the LBS I bought this bike from is helpful for selling and repairing bikes but when it comes to questions about upgrades and improving your ride they don't seem to helpful. As much as I like my LBS I wish I could get better service when it comes to MTBing questions. I hate pestering the companies who produce these products to get answers to my questions. I should be able to talk to my LBS whom I just spent $550 bucks with 2 months ago and then brought a friend in later who also bought a new bike. I feel alone in the cornfield lol.

  25. #25
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    I am from Iowa so I feel your pain. Midwest LBS cater more to those of the roadie persuasion. They sell mountain bikes but the actual sport is well off their radar.

    If you still feel the need for a little more room in the cockpit, try a more subtle change like a 660mm bar and 90mm stem. FWIW, I use a 90mm stem and 680mm bar on a bike with a 71° head tube angle but I live in Utah now and my average rides have about 1000-2000 feet of elevation gain and loss. Contrast to the 150 feet elevation gain I would get back in Iowa. Even with all the descending I'm doing now, I don't feel the need for an AM/Trail bike as I'm already hitting 30mph on some downhills and I really don't want to give up the climbing efficiency of my XC bike.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Yea you hit it right on the head. Road bikes are the prevailing bike around these parts so it's tough to find anyone with any serious knowledge.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    If I dare ask, is there a happy medium for a bike to do a combination of downhill and uphill and some jumping? I suppose this is where a person needs multiple bikes for the type of riding that day? For a good all around bike is it better to lean towards the XC side or the all mountain?

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    Well for me the xc setup wasn't cutting it. It was just too squirmy for me, going down hill I was fighting the bike to keep it straight over rough terrain. With a more am setup I'm finding it easier to hold a line on the same trails. You don't need multiple bikes, but the am kinda bridges the gap some.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  29. #29
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    I think of it this way. I pretty much spend 2/3 or more of the time climbing or riding flat terrain. The downhill stuff goes by wayyy too fast for that to be a priority in my decision making process. I need a bike that is light enough to climb comfortably and is nimble enough to thread the needle when I need it to.

    I had a Kona Dawg (5 inch travel AM bike) for a very short time here in Utah and it simply did not meet those requirements. It was fine on the downhill but like I said 15 minutes shredding down the mountain is not worth pedaling a pig for 45 minutes up the mountain. On my bike with XC geo I can get up the mountain in 35 minutes instead of 45 and still feel like I have some energy to keep going. The downhill still takes 15 minutes. I'm limited by nerves, not the bike. Riding any faster seems downright reckless to me, especially considering how crowded the trails can get in the evenings and weekends.

    I would say 90% of the bikes I have ever seen on the trails have been XC. I'm talking about anywhere. From northern Minnesota to southern Missouri and even to Utah. When I see a downhill or AM/Trail/whatever bike, it's headed up the lift. For Iowa, I can't think of anything that would require more than an XC bike.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 8iking VIIking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,252

    Re: questions about stem selection

    Adding to what dgw2jr said, I think XC bikes are capable of much more than some people give them credit for. All I've owned in the last few years are 71° xc bikes, and I've ridden all kinds of nasty terrain that most would consider AM bike territory, even lift assisted riding.

    I think mountain biking has been fractured into so many niches that people see a certain bike (xc bike in this case) and picture a certain type of terrain. I think the main contributor to this thinking is marketing, bike companies want people to think they need 5 bikes to ride a variety of terrain, which is just silly IMO.

    I'm not advocating doing red bull rampage type stuff on you XC bike, but it'll handle quite a bit of punishment

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    I think it's kinda dangerous to be doing lift service dh on a standard xc bike. It's not the geometry that's going to break it's the components like the wheels fork stem etc.. The geo is just gonna affect it's handling.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  32. #32
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    I think it's kinda dangerous to be doing lift service dh on a standard xc bike. It's not the geometry that's going to break it's the components like the wheels fork stem etc.. The geo is just gonna affect it's handling.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Well that kinda depends on how fast you are going

    And not all lift served riding is like Whistler.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    You don't need 5 different bikes, but you do need one capable of doing the most intense riding that you do. If I was doing lift service dh, and regular trails, and could only have one bike, I would definitely look more towards a trail or am bike that bridges the gap between a dh bike and an xc.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  34. #34
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    The nearest lift-assisted riding available to the OP is probably Spirit Mountain in Duluth, MN with about 700 feet of elevation difference. That's quite a drive from anywhere in Iowa.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Yea I am not into lift service riding lol. I just ride trails but I like to go fast and hit small jumps and I love plowing into corners and sliding the rear wheel around as I take off the next hill or straight away. That's how I get my rush......not by flying off cliffs. I am not sure I would have the balls to ride that kind of stuff.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    You'd be surprised at what you'll do when you get bored of your current ability lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  37. #37
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760

    Re: questions about stem selection

    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    You'd be surprised at what you'll do when you get bored of your current ability lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    He'll move to Utah lol
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    I'm looking into moving to colorado once my gf sells her apt

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    I live close to the loess hills and there is a park called waubonsie state park in those hills. It has walking trails that are extreme elevation changes. I am talking popping ears. I took my bike on some of them trails and I had a blast until I seen the no bicycle sign at a trail head. I haven't been back.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,762
    Lol take the sign down and help going back.. Tell some friends. Hell, make a sign that says bikes are permitted.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 8iking VIIking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,252

    Re: questions about stem selection

    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Lol take the sign down and help going back.. Tell some friends. Hell, make a sign that says bikes are permitted.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Ya, or not.... That's a good way to get riding banned in other areas where it's currently allowed

  42. #42
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760

    Re: questions about stem selection

    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I live close to the loess hills and there is a park called waubonsie state park in those hills. It has walking trails that are extreme elevation changes. I am talking popping ears. I took my bike on some of them trails and I had a blast until I seen the no bicycle sign at a trail head. I haven't been back.
    So you're fairly close to Omaha and a couple hours from Kansas City.

    Check out Lewis and Clark monument in Council Bluffs. 5 miles of trail in the Loess Hills with the some good climbs and descents. About 200 feet elevation difference.

    If you can get down to Kansas City check out Landahl and Shawnee Mission Park.

    And if you can spare a weekend, head down to Lake Wilson State Park between Salina and Hays, Kansas. Closest thing to gnar you'll get within a 6 hour drive.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Quote Originally Posted by dgw2jr View Post
    So you're fairly close to Omaha and a couple hours from Kansas City.

    Check out Lewis and Clark monument in Council Bluffs. 5 miles of trail in the Loess Hills with the some good climbs and descents. About 200 feet elevation difference.

    If you can get down to Kansas City check out Landahl and Shawnee Mission Park.

    And if you can spare a weekend, head down to Lake Wilson State Park between Salina and Hays, Kansas. Closest thing to gnar you'll get within a 6 hour drive.

    Plan on hitting Lewis and Clark tomorrow with a friend. Been meaning to just haven't yet. Last Sunday we stopped by Grain Valley south of KC and it had been raining and several experienced MTBers had been on it and said it was too wet and muddy and not worth riding. They said it was the best trail in the KC area. So we headed to Smithville Lake and hit one of them trails. It was fun.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 8iking VIIking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,252
    Dont mean to get too off topic but, dgw2jr- have you ever ridden in the Vernal area? I lived there for a few years and will be heading back next month. Also gonna do some riding in park city, stoked for that! Lived in vernal for 3 years and never rode there....what a shame

  45. #45
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Quote Originally Posted by 8iking VIIking View Post
    Dont mean to get too off topic but, dgw2jr- have you ever ridden in the Vernal area? I lived there for a few years and will be heading back next month. Also gonna do some riding in park city, stoked for that! Lived in vernal for 3 years and never rode there....what a shame
    Planning to ride Vernal in the early fall. Closest I've gotten so far is Price. I suppose if I want to ride Flume trail I need to get out there in September before snow becomes an issue.

    I live in Ogden so my usual rides are up at Snowbasin or North Fork Park. When the sun isn't scorching I ride the Bonneville Shoreline trail. I'm planning to ride Antelope Island through winter.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 8iking VIIking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,252

    Re: questions about stem selection

    Quote Originally Posted by dgw2jr View Post
    Planning to ride Vernal in the early fall. Closest I've gotten so far is Price. I suppose if I want to ride Flume trail I need to get out there in September before snow becomes an issue.

    I live in Ogden so my usual rides are up at Snowbasin or North Fork Park. When the sun isn't scorching I ride the Bonneville Shoreline trail. I'm planning to ride Antelope Island through winter.
    September is the best time to ride there, the flume trail is still rideable and its not too hot to ride McCoy flats or red fleet during the day. All 3 are awesome, but red fleet is my favorite

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074

    My 2 cents now......

    Well guys I have rode a few advanced rated trails since i got into this sport but my skill level is progressing rapidly. So the Lewis and Clark trail, that I rode yesterday, I rode much faster and better than any other trails before. I actually hit every downhill instead of walking my bike down as in the past. This trail had lots of steep downhill drops and sharp turns (some banked). It was a pretty fast trail with some steep climbs. After most drops there was a short flat followed by a banked climb. Some drops had sharp boulders taking up half the drop so you had to make sure you steered to the side as you were falling.

    For this ride I dropped my seat a couple inches so that I still have a slight bend in the knee at pedal full down although the bend in the knee is a little more than before. I do 90% of my climbs standing up around these parts as they tend to be pretty steep (especially yesterday in the Loess Hills where this trail was) so I am not that concerned about seat height unless I am riding a flat trail. My seat is also adjusted all the way forward. I realize that moving the seat back more shifts my weight more rearward which is good for drops but I am out of the seat anyways allowing my body to be feet heavy and hand light as I have been reading about and having the seat forward allows me to slide off the seat rearward better as well as having me more upright with my longer stem.

    So my factory geometry is a 100 mm stem with a 10 degree rise, 620 mm bars with a 6 degree sweep and a 13mm rise, and my XC headtube angle of 70 degrees. Remember I ordered a 70 mm stem with a 6 degree rise and 725 mm bars and when I had discovered this was not optimal for a XC gemoetry I sent them back to shipper.

    Yesterday I felt in complete control going down these drops and even when a sharp banked turn followed shortly after I noticed that the bike turned on a dime with tons of stability. This bike cornered like a dream. the steering and handling was excellent even with my noob ability I felt like a pro in the cockpit. I don't know whether pros stay seated or standing in a fast corners but I spent a bunch of them yesterday feet heavy standing out of the seat and this bike went exactly where I pointed it. Going down the drops I felt in full control and never felt like the bike was taking me off my line. And in climbs I was normally standing anyways so seat position either vertically or horizontally had little impact on my climbing. All I can say is with the factory geometry this bike points like a dream and is easy to control and turn sharp and quick without sacrificing stability or safety. It is responsive yet not overly twitchy. I am sure there might be some stuff you can do to fine tune it better such as drop 10 mm on a stem (90) or go up 40 mm on the bar length but honestly this bike did so well for me yesterday I am not sure I want to change a thing.

    And keep in mind this is all done with a crappy RST Blaze spring pogo stick fork with compression adjustment only (no rebound). Imagine how much better this will be when I get around to putting a Manitou Marvel comp on. I think that will be on my Christmas list. I am glad I listened to some of you, as well as my Jamis factory tech, and left this bike alone. Thanks.

  48. #48
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,760

    questions about stem selection

    That's great news. A decent fork and a nice wheel set are the biggest improvements you could make to a bike. Keep us posted.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spirit4earth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Well I feel like an idiot. I cancelled my orders for my new stem and bars. I was worried about what dgw2jr said so I called and talked to Jamis themselves and they said for sure that would not be a good combo for this geometry. My trouble is the LBS I bought this bike from is helpful for selling and repairing bikes but when it comes to questions about upgrades and improving your ride they don't seem to helpful. As much as I like my LBS I wish I could get better service when it comes to MTBing questions. I hate pestering the companies who produce these products to get answers to my questions. I should be able to talk to my LBS whom I just spent $550 bucks with 2 months ago and then brought a friend in later who also bought a new bike. I feel alone in the cornfield lol.
    I have a Jamis Dragon that I'm thinking about tweaking. Which Jamis do you have, what size is it, and how tall are you (if you don't mind me asking )?
    "Geologic time includes now."

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,074
    Quote Originally Posted by spirit4earth View Post
    I have a Jamis Dragon that I'm thinking about tweaking. Which Jamis do you have, what size is it, and how tall are you (if you don't mind me asking )?
    Jamis Trail. 6' and a 19" frame

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-06-2014, 04:14 PM
  2. TruVativ Handlebar and Stem questions
    By cameden in forum 29er Components
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-07-2014, 07:59 AM
  3. LD stem questions.
    By jeff in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-26-2013, 12:00 PM
  4. I have a few questions about bike selection.
    By J Hartman in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: 11-18-2012, 02:49 PM
  5. 1.5" stem selection?
    By Bugeye in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-20-2012, 03:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •