Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Cannondale Snob
    Reputation: RiskEverything's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    715

    Questions *FOR* the newbies about your first bikes.

    Couple questions for all the riders who read this forum.

    What type of bike was your first?
    What material was it made out of?
    Rigid, Hardtail, Full Suspension?
    26" 27.5" or 29" tires?
    Do you remember what type of components were on it?
    How much did you pay for it?
    Did you keep it or sell it?
    If you kept it, did you feel the frame was worth upgrading the components?
    If you sold it, why?

    Would you buy one similar to it again?

    I'll go first:
    My first bike was a 2002 Iron Horse Warrior Comp. Aluminum HT with 26" wheels, cable disc brakes, and Deore components. I paid $250 for it, second-hand but with little use. I sold it 4 months later for the same price, because I'd bought a 2006 Cannondale Rush 1000 that was 5lbs lighter. I missed the HT so much that I bought a 2004 Cannondale F600 (second-hand, for $500, then upgraded the entire drivetrain to XT dual-control to match my Rush). It eventually got stolen, so I still want a HT... but am thinking I'll go carbon-fiber this time. *Maybe* 29er.
    '06 Cannondale Rush 1000 4" travel 27lbs
    '04 Cannondale F600 SOBE -STOLEN!
    '96 Cannondale Uber-V 6" travel 30lbs

  2. #2
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,496
    1988 or so Ross Mt Olympus with GS200 components for something like $300. 26" steel rigid or 26" steel rigid were pretty much the available choices, so I went with the 26" steel rigid. Been through a whole lotta bikes since then, everything from steel, titanium and aluminum hardtails in everything from XC to freeride to street/DJ flavors, a whole bunch of FS bikes with anywhere from 3" to 8" travel, and all sorts of others from BMX bikes to unicycles to ski-bikes. Still have quite a few of them around in one form or another. Some even work.

    I don't even wanna start thinking about how many different components, frame styles and materials, or dollars I've gone through. When people step into my garage and/or shed, they typically just shake their head and say 'Dude, WTF?'.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    79
    Questions *FOR* the newbies about your first bikes.-gedc1743_zps68863257.jpgMy first bike was a stingray used for 26 bucks. It was a birthday present maybe my 8th. I had rode many before because I am the baby of five. My first mountain bike was a Giant 760 ATX 1990, and I killed it not the bike. I'm still loving the hand me downs. Pre war? Might have road it at 10.

  4. #4
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,630
    I bought a 1997 or 1998ish Diamondback Sorrento. 26" rigid steel, but I put a low end suspension fork on it after a couple months. Didn't ride it hard for about a year, and beat the ever living $hit out of it my freshman year of college. I think I paid around $350 for the bike and the fork together with my first job in high school. All of the bearings were completely shot after my freshman year of college, and instead of replacing them all, I sold it and upgraded to a 2000 Diamondback Topanga Comp. 26" Aluminum hardtail. That bike came with decent bearings, so I didn't feel the need to dump it so quickly. I did upgrade to a FS after a few years, but I still kept that HT in service until about 2010ish or so, when I sold it. It had been my commute bike for a few years, and I used the funds to build a purpose-built commute bike. I put a few modest upgrades on it over the years, mostly because parts broke or wore out.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mizzaboom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    432
    My first mountain bike at age 15 (after years of racing NBL bmx nationally) was a 1996 Fuji Tahoe SX -- an aluminum hardtail frame with a Rock Shox Jett XC fork, and 26 wheels. This was a basic entry level bike (~$400) at the time and IIRC the components were Deore and SLX.

    I road the piss out of it until I went to college and by then it was far too small for me after hitting a late teen growth spurt. So it served as transportation too and from class and later to the bars. The sad part is that I went to school in the mountains and there were trails everywhere...I just didn't feel safe/comfortable riding hard on trails with a bike I had severely outgrown. I also didn't have much money and spent most of my time playing lacrosse, skiing, and chasing women.

    Definitely was not worth upgrading. I still have it and actually stripped it down to the frame this winter when I was board. I plan on keeping the frame for my 2 year old son to ride at some point.
    All good things in all good time

  6. #6
    Redcoat
    Reputation: Brockwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,003
    Saracen Hardtrax '97

    SARACEN Hardtrax MTB mountain bike. Made in England back when Saracen produced really decent bikes. 90s silver and HARDTRAX frame, Some very unique frame details, 3 x top tube cable runs, rear brake hanger, tapered chainstays.
    TANGE Chromoly . Shimano Alivio caliper front brakes. Quick release front wheel and quick release seat post.



  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,199
    First mountain bike (teenage) was my dad's old 26" bike. K-mart special from the 80s. completely jacked up the fork on a BMX track in Arkansas. At about 19 years, found an abandoned 24" bike with a bent back wheel and a solid rusted chain. I'm 6'4", so it was like riding a BMX bike. It sucked, but I rode it. Still have fond memories of putting the wheel over some Louisiana cypress roots and trying to straighten it out by jumping on it. And yes, alcohol was involved.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4
    The sad part is that I went to school in the mountains and there were trails everywhere.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fishboy316's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    411
    I just bought mine. 2013 Cdale F29 1 alloy Lefty. Hardtail lefty fork. Great bike! It has a X9 group. Really love it
    Questions *FOR* the newbies about your first bikes.-0202141522.jpg
    2013 Cannondale F29 1 Alloy
    2013 Cervelo S5 Rival
    2012 Trek X01 crosser
    2017 Trek Farley 7
    2017Trek Domane SLR 6

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3
    I've had bikes and have ridden as long as I can remember. Most were inexpensive kids' bikes, however, I do remember my late '60s, early 70's Schwinn Sting Ray (three speed stick shift) in green. Loved that bike! Then in the late 70's early 80's I had a Schwinn Le Tour in red. I replaced the rear cassette with one that provided significantly higher gearing and rode that bike everywhere until it was stolen outside my church one afternoon.

    After the Le Tour was stolen, I purchased a Shogun road bike, 18-speed (I think) in a stunning off-white pearl paint. That one traveled to college with me and served as my primary transportation for several years until outdoor exposure finally killed it. Bikes had to be locked up outside the dorm with no protection from the elements. Ended up just throwing that one away.

    Fast forward several years to the early 90's and I purchased a GT Outpost AllTerra 21-speed with rigid frame in electric blue. This was my first "mountain bike" which I kept mostly stock and rode it nearly daily for almost 10 years. At the end of this period I took a massive spill on the trails resulting in a broken back and months of recovery. Due to family, health and work changes on top of the injury, I pretty much quit riding and eventually sold the bike which I regret as I really liked it.

    So, just recently, I've started riding again and purchased a Specialized Crosstrail Disc for myself along with bikes for the rest of the family. We're doing more road and rail trail riding now as I'm not really interested into getting back into the heavy mountain biking just yet.

    I know I didn't really answer all the OP's questions, but I'm working from memory for most of this...

  11. #11
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,785
    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Couple questions for all the riders who read this forum.

    What type of bike was your first?
    Could make for some interesting, and enlightening conversation, so I'll play. . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    What material was it made out of?
    1996 GT Outpost: Steel 4130 main triangle with 'Hi-Ten' rear triangle. . . . . very generic, but well made.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Rigid, Hardtail, Full Suspension?
    Rigid fork

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    26" 27.5" or 29" tires?
    26" (like pretty much every MTB in existence at the time)

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Do you remember what type of components were on it?
    Shimano Acera 7 speed components. The shifters were integrated with the brake levers. Cantilever brakes. Entry level wheels and tires. Quill stem/threaded headset.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    How much did you pay for it?
    $325 new.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Did you keep it or sell it?
    I still own it.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    If you kept it, did you feel the frame was worth upgrading the components?
    At the time, when I didn't know any better, I thought it was worth upgrading. AND upgrade I did.

    I ended up sinking a fair amount of money into it on the following:

    Rock Shox Judy XC (a decent fork for the time) with a 1" steerer. Ended up upgrading the internals to aluminum Englund aluminum cartridges and Mountain Speed Springs and extending the travel from 63mm to (long travel LOL) 80mm.

    Threadless headset (so the Judy would work on this frame).

    Riser handlebar with lock-on grips

    XT 8 speed shifters with v-brake levers. (ran it as 7 speed - which is 'do-able')

    XT v-brakes

    Answer Body Shock seatpost

    WTB SST saddle

    13-34 Mega-Range cassette

    Upgraded the wheelset a little to a lighter wheelset with narrower rims.

    Newer Acera rear derailleur.

    Eventually, I had replaced EVERYTHING on the bike except the frame and the front derailleur, and had spent more than double the original purchase price (on top of the original purchase price) in upgrading a generic frame with a 1" head tube.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    If you sold it, why?
    N/A. I still have it, and it is a bit of a shrine to the pros and cons of 'upgraditis'.

    You know how former *(insert applicable term here, such as addicts/smokers/sinners/whatever)* are the most zealous and quick to point out the errors of whatever it is they were totally guilty of doing?

    Yeah. That is me

    Quote Originally Posted by RiskEverything View Post
    Would you buy one similar to it again?
    At the time I bought it, I thought $325 was a LOT of money to pay for a bicycle. In hindsight, I would have been better off saving up more and getting a better bike up front. I would have got an aluminum frame with a 1-1/8" head tube, and better components. Maybe a suspension fork too. Even if I had wanted to upgrade some things, it would have been easier to do so because I would already have had a threadless (1-1/8") headset and the shifter/brake controls would have been separate items.

    The other more pragmatic path would have been to just ride the Outpost as is, and save up for a better bike.

    But nooooo, I knew better

    I'm not saying you should never upgrade a bike. I just think you should know the pros and cons going in, and then make the best decision for you. If you're going to buy an entry level bike with the idea that you'll upgrade along the way, it would be advisable to get a frame the is worth upgrading as you progress in the sport. Today, I would say that would mean getting a frame that is well made (of course) with geometry that is conducive to more aggressive riding, and that has features that will work with components that are going to still be made in the future. One of those will (IMHO) be a tapered head tube, and maybe a rear post mount for the brake. Maybe an integrated or semi-integrated headset treatment on the head tube as well, and enough tire clearance to run up to a 2.3" tire as well. I would also look for a frame with a common size seat tube so that seat post options are wide open. The best sizes IMHO would be either 30.9mm or 31.6mm.

    An entry level frame that can run (or be converted to) a 142 rear axle is a pipe dream at the time of this writing.

    Also, if you want to ride 'DH' or 'All Mountain', get a frame that is suitable for that type of riding. Frankenbiking an entry level XC bike is never a good idea. If you find yourself wanting to 'shred the gnar' , get an appropriate bike (or frame) and go from there.

Similar Threads

  1. Fat Bike Newbies
    By likeaboss in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-09-2014, 07:14 AM
  2. Three newbies, Ape Canyon
    By Gold Cobra in forum Washington
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-02-2013, 06:08 PM
  3. affordable bikes for 400lb+ newbies
    By 6'4 400 lbs in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-11-2012, 01:35 PM
  4. Newbies new bike
    By Fast Willy in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-02-2012, 07:07 PM
  5. BMX talk for newbies?
    By MTBkitty in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-06-2011, 09:25 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •