1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10

    Question: Brakes

    I am new to riding on a regular basis and currently own a Specialized Hardrock sport (no disc). IF I could do it again, I would like to have purchased the Comp Disc version. However, I can not turn back the clock. My question is simple: Would it be in my best interest to upgrade both front and rear brake systems. Should I purchase a wheel set or just change out the hubs. I am trying to cut costs but still have a decent setup.

    Ive looked into the Avid BB7. I have considered upgrading only the rear but fear that might be a bad choice as well.

    I ride 3 times a week, mostly single tracks. Typical ride is 8-15miles.

    Specialized Hardrock Sport 06.

  2. #2
    Fat, but working on it...
    Reputation: IAmCosmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    537
    Most of your braking force comes from the front wheel, so if you are going to upgrade just one end, make it the front. Check with some of the online shops like Performance. They always have deals on disc wheelsets...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    122
    I would say that unless you are riding in wet muddy condition the V brakes will work fine. If you still don't like the feel try different pads, such as Kool Stop MTB's. Hope that helps some.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10
    From my understanding, the pads tend to lock the wheel up more than slow it down. Since I am new, I tend to ride the brakes pretty hard down some of the steeper/more rutted hills. The wheel then has a tendency to lock. Its not a huge problem, that could be solved with experiance, but again, I am working off of hearsay.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: InvictaS1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,851
    you should definately try a new set of pads, a softer compound pad will give you better braking power.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    122
    A tip when using brakes is to pulse/pump is smooth manner, that way they slow you down with out locking them up. If they are locking up it means that you are applying too much break, or on loose/slippery serface. Either way time on the bike will help you in all situations and comfort level with the way the breaks work.Think of it this way if the tires are locking up = too much break. If speed is the issue try entering the down hill at a slower speed that way less break is needed to slow down. Which means more control.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Udrija's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    185
    I'm a big guy and before I purchased my bike I tried both v-brakes and discs and of course went with discs the stopping power over v-brakes is a big difference so I would say if you upgrade go with at least the front wheel and if you can do both

  8. #8
    Riding free's the mind
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,003

    Go discs

    Since I've had disc brakes - Avid BB7's and now Juicy 7's - I haven't had a crash since. The better braking performance you get from discs really does make mtn biking safer in my opinion. If you do any long descents, discs are the only way to go. You won't experience any fading and dirt, dust and other debris is not an issue as it is with rim brakes.

    I'd consider investing in both wheels, and get a good wheelset or hubs. You can always transfer these components to your next frame.
    [SIZE=2]Question to a custom frame builder..."So what makes your bikes climb better?"....his answer, "Uh, your legs?"[/SIZE]

  9. #9
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,377

    Plan "B"

    sell the bike if it's new and shiny for say $300 (new was $360)

    Take that cash and get the Hardrock here @ $600, a $300 increase, it has a decent fork and decent brakes; lower Hardrocks don't.

    It may be cheaper than upgrading the current bike. weigh the cost of upgrades vs a $300 new ride with better fork and brakes.

    But ONLY if you need discs, due to wet and mud, or steep technical rides.

    Good luck, Jim

  10. #10
    lurker no more
    Reputation: oreo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    168
    I tend to agree with trying a new pad compound on your v-brakes and work on your braking techniques if you are on a tight budget.

    If you have to have disc brakes due to adverse riding conditions or just need that extra power I'd probably go upgrade the entire bike as someone posted earlier. Beyond Bikes.com is selling the Avid BB7 for $120 for the front and rear brakes, so the total is $240 for the entire set. Add that to paying already MSRP $360 and you have a $600 bike, already the cost of the Hardrock Comp disc. In addition you also have to probably change out your hubs on your current bike too as I don't think they have the disc brake mounts on them (read it'll cost even more money). Looking at the specialized web page it looks as if your current ride have the IS brake tabs on the fork and seat stay already, so at least that's covered. You probably won't need anything bigger than a 160mm rotor unless you're getting into pretty gnarly terrain. Plus you could produce a lot of torque on your hub and 30mm fork stanchion with a larger rotor. Well, that's my $0.02. You might try Larry at mtnhighcyclery.com or Chad at redbarnbicycles.com as well. They have pretty good deals as well and reasonable shipping prices.

    Good luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by cskelly
    I am new to riding on a regular basis and currently own a Specialized Hardrock sport (no disc). IF I could do it again, I would like to have purchased the Comp Disc version. However, I can not turn back the clock. My question is simple: Would it be in my best interest to upgrade both front and rear brake systems. Should I purchase a wheel set or just change out the hubs. I am trying to cut costs but still have a decent setup.

    Ive looked into the Avid BB7. I have considered upgrading only the rear but fear that might be a bad choice as well.

    I ride 3 times a week, mostly single tracks. Typical ride is 8-15miles.

    Specialized Hardrock Sport 06.

  11. #11
    Flying Goat
    Reputation: mrpercussive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    11,329
    Check this link out... it's really tempting for me too... but things are drying up here in NorCal so i dont think i'm gonna need them. So i've decided to save the money for a new bike by the end of the year... Anyways... here's the link

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...isc-Brakes.htm

    I'm not sure if it comes with the cables and levers though. However, if i change my mind... how hard would it be to fix disc brakes on your bike? What kinda tools needed?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10
    I must say, I am so glad to have found this webpage. No drama, no BS, just honest opinions. If I can sell my current rig for 300-325 (it is SPOTLESS and has a free tune up due as well) then im only down $25+tax for the bike. I will then run out and find a deal on a comp disc setup and be set. Like everyone has pointed out, for the same price or less, I can upgrade the whole bike which has better brakes and fork than current.

    If that doesnt go over, then I will try new pads and practice breaking technique. Then save up for a new bike as well.

    Again Thank you guys very much.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •