1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Question about disc brakes and hubs

    So I have a dawes roundhouse 2000 and am going to upgraded the fork. There is a fox on ebay with a 15mm thru axle. There is also a rockshox with a 9mm qr (which is on my bike). Should I get a new wheel set or just get the rock shox? Is it possible to get my current wheels rehubbed?And if I got a new wheelset would it be possible to mount the rear wheel on a 9mm quick release? Also, are all disc brakes universal so could I mount my current rotors on a new wheelset?? I have already upgraded the rear shock.

  2. #2
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    I'm not familiar with this bike but a couple of general pieces of information. Don't put too much money into a lower end bike (not saying it is, i dont know) getting a 15 mm wheel is going to cost a decent amount. No one can really intelligently give you advice on which fork to buy without the exact specs (or at least links to the ebay listings) You can have your wheel rehubbed to get a 15mm but again, i dont know that the cost would be worth it without knowing what wheels they are and if they are worth upgrading.

    The only thing I can definitively tell you is that No, all disc brakes are not universal. They are either going to be 6 bolt or centerlock. That has to match up to the hub you have.

  3. #3
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    re-lacing a wheel isn't cheap. if you can DIY, you can save on a lot of the cost. but it's not like just bolting on a new part. Your wheels are probably not worth swapping hubs. knowing bd bikes, they come with crap wheels anyway. Use what you have to save money, or buy a new wheelset if you want 15mm.

    if I was upgrading my bike, I'd make whatever change required me to replace the least amount of OTHER parts. so if my wheels are QR, then I only look at QR forks with steerers that are long enough and the correct diameter for my bike.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Re: Question about disc brakes and hubs

    IMO, relacing a wheel doesn't make sense. I can buy a complete wheel for what it would cost me to buy a hub and spokes a la carte. And the rims on my bikes are mostly a bit chewed, at least by the time they've got their first season behind them. So why spend more money and go to more trouble to have a worse wheel? Sometimes scrounging used parts can change this. You mention paying someone else to do the work. Some shops simply won't reuse an old rim, and regardless, you're raising the price of the frankenwheel that much more. Price a few complete wheels. Use that figure to decide if you want the Fox fork.

    Disc brakes are not universal. There are two common rotor mount standards: six-bolt and splined. You can get an adapter to put a six-bolt rotor on a splined hub, but not the other way. I dislike that sort of thing and it raises your cost, but it's an option and maybe you have a line on a wheel with a splined hub.

    I tell everyone who wants to throw parts at a cheap bike this: consider what you want to end up with eventually. Do you want this frame for keeps? Are you planning to buy every part on the bike a second time, or will you be done after buying a new fork?

    How long have you had this bike? How much suspension travel does it have?

    I've gone back and forth on 1:1 parts swaps and more extensive revisions. Mid-season, replacing something I broke, I'd probably be looking to entrain as few other parts as possible.

    When I'm anticipating my team form, I think more in terms of what I'd like to ride next season. I'm also more comfortable with a bigger project when it's January, the weather sucks, and I won't miss good riding days having a bike in pieces. Though I do try to stick to one bike project at a time.

    Anyway, for me, it'd be a gut check. I see choosing a fork to fit a wheel as putting the cart before the horse, but I would also consider the extra cost of a new wheel, especially if I already had a front wheel I was expecting to last a long time, in comparing prices between the two forks. I'll probably be making this decision myself this winter. The old fork on my 'B' bike isn't moving right lately. Haven't decided what to do yet...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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