1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
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    Quality bike at a quality price for a heavy (weight) rider

    I have been riding BMX trails for a long time, since I was 10 or 11 I think (I am 20.) I picked up a cheap Schwinn S-25 to bring to college for tripping around town, I didn't want my hand built BMX bike to get stolen in the area my school is in.

    Basically this is my predicament, I have really gotten into downhill riding (up the paved road, down the switchback) and I have always been into "extreme" sports and ride halfpipe all winter on skis so I naturally ride my bike pretty hard. I basically spend 3 hours riding, 3 hours repairing at this point, it really isn't worth it.

    I am 6'1" 240 and have a very muscular build. I need to keep my weight for football and ultimate fighting so don't tell me to get skinnier It's not gonna happen.

    I came here to see what $400 or so could get me in a bike my size that can handle my weight and overall strength. I want to be able to push it on the trails and not worry about keeping it too close to the ground to avoid destruction and injury on landing. I would prefer a hardtail but if there is a very stiff dual suspension that is recommended I would go that route too. My crappy Schwinn is damn near impossible to ride uphill on pavement, let alone in any sort of loose dirt, too mushy on the suspension.

    Thanks in advance! Sorry about the long and rambling post.

  2. #2
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    Specialized hardrock or rockhopper. I lost 40 pounds on that bike. And I was 240. It should work for you. You might want to get a stronger seat though.

  3. #3
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    Thanks! I really like the look of them too, never ridden but a friend has one and it seems very sturdy and obviously well built.

  4. #4
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    kona clump?

  5. #5
    Fat guy on a bike
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    Any of the lower end hardtails from the major manufacturers should work. Some are more tailored to the bike jumper than others. At your weight you will most likely need a better wheelset that will come on the bikes in your price range, as thats one of the main areas of concern for us big guys. Plan on buying a new set fairly soon.

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