1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: proper shoe fit

  1. #1
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    proper shoe fit

    so i was told at the LBS that the Shimano makes one of the widest shoes for cycling. I picked up a pair of size 44 which are plenty long enough but my wide ass duck style feet still seem to get sore in the sides almost like blood flow is getting cut off. THey are dang nice shoes and fit well everywhere but the sides.

    Does this go away with time? IVe only been out on a few rides so i havent given it much time but i thought i would ask.

    Can one use a shoe stretcher?

    I must say that this is my first cycling shoe.....and wow what a difference in riding while you are clipped in. I love the power on the up stroke. I always always always shuned people that did it because i thought it was kind of corny but i was surprised.

  2. #2
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    Hmm, if you truly have duck feet, then I think you're going to have trouble finding bike shoes....at least the sexy Italian-looking ones
    I also have odd feet, and my shoes either feel good riding, and not walking, or the other way around. You may want to look into some of the more casual styles...I've seen some skate-style shoes that accept cleats, but I don't know who makes them. Shimano might, and I think Pearl Izumi has a few casual models too. They don't look like the most technical shoes, and they may not be stiff enough to run with eggbeaters, but paired with the right pedal you may have luck keeping blood flowing to your toesies.

  3. #3
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    *see post in other forum*

  4. #4
    Still learning
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    I was advised to buy M300s on advise of a physio who was going to heat/vacuum mould them. Initially they certainly felt like a shoe that I would not pick by choice, based on how they felt, hoever in time (only a few weeks) the form of them seemed to shape themselves, and they now feel much better.

    I'm not sure if the 225s would behave the same way, due to them not being intended for moulding.
    Quote Originally Posted by tom2304
    Yep farkin.net is mostly immature kids asking how to put dual crown forks on hardtails and such.

  5. #5
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    If you're an "E" width (or wider) you're gonna' have a tough time w/bike shoes not specifically made for duck feet. I tried the shoe stretch thing in the past, but it never really worked out for me...I'd just end up rolling 'em over the sides of the sole over time and they never were comfortable.

    I wear a 9-9 1/2 "E" shoe (I'm actually a 'tad wider than an "E", not quite "EE") and the wide Lakes in 43.5 fit well. They were a little bit narrow at first, but once they broke in a little they fit fine. I've been wearing mx165s since last fall and they still look new (sans dirt, of course). 'Probably the best value out there in a wide shoe, I think.

    Sidi makes a very nice mega shoe, though you could buy several pairs of 165 Lakes for what a single pair of Sidi's costs. I've never tried the Sidi's but most ducks I know who have love them.

    Not a lot of options out there for the ducks. I started riding last fall after a 12, or so, year hiatus off the bike (back injury). At least it is better now than it was...back in the late 80's through mid-90's $500 (in those day's dollars) custom made shoes were about the only option for those with wider feet. I just got used to numb toes back then.

  6. #6
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    I am a 11-1/2 EE. Am I going to have a hard time finding bike shoes?

  7. #7
    i also unicycle
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    everyone i know with wide feet uses either lakes or sidis depending on budget.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

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