1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #26
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    My bike is usually covered in dirt/mud/grime about 65% of the time after I'm done riding.

    If your bike is getting wet due to wet/muddy conditions on the trail what is the difference between getting it wet with a hose. Nothing! As long as you aren't high power blasting the thing, it will all be fine.

    I have always used a hose to get everything clean. Suds it up, use a brush/sponge to remove gunk. I then dry it off and wipe it all down and re-lube where necessary. I've never had to replace anything, my bikes have been fine.

    I usually turn my bikes over every 5 years or so, so maybe if I was really trying to extend the longest possible shelf life of my bike I'd maybe be a bit more careful..... but I doubt it.

    I vote for washing and drying, and having a nice clean bike. At least until your next ride

  2. #27
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    I've been using this method since I started mountain biking and have not experienced paint getting blasted off or any other problems. I think this method works best in removing dirt/grime in places that are hard to reach or too time consuming, even with a brush.
    Yeti SB-66 Carbon

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Map204 View Post
    I'll try it and report back
    Sweet! I can't wait to hear the results!

  4. #29
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    The pressure is adjustable. This just isn't that big of a deal. It used to be a big deal and can be if you aren't using sealed bearings. Headsets, bottom brackets, hubs and pulleys are easily replaced and so are the parts that contain them.

    It's recommended to repack or replace them every year anyway.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  5. #30
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    bearing shields

    Here's an idea; garden foam wire ties. One wrap and twist around each bearing area before spraying. They are a half inch in diameter and should be re-usable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Powerwashing Bikes-rapiclip_foam_wire_835__72373__63383.1348982054.1280.1280.jpg  


  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by obdon View Post
    Here's an idea; garden foam wire ties. One wrap and twist around each bearing area before spraying. They are a half inch in diameter and should be re-usable.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Because they get free bikes.
    Not quite. Those bikes cost someone money. Those teams don't necessarily just blow through stuff all willy nilly. They've got budgets to work with. Granted, they usually do have quite large product budgets, but they do still often have to be mindful of cost.

    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    ...and it's not advisable especially if you have a carbon fiber bike.

    -S
    Yet another carbon alarmist. You would have to have a pressure washer turned up awfully high to damage a carbon frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    The pressure is adjustable. This just isn't that big of a deal. It used to be a big deal and can be if you aren't using sealed bearings. Headsets, bottom brackets, hubs and pulleys are easily replaced and so are the parts that contain them.

    It's recommended to repack or replace them every year anyway.
    ^ This.

    If you know what you're doing and know where to spray, it's an efficient way to get your bike clean.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deep Thought View Post
    Yet another carbon alarmist. You would have to have a pressure washer turned up awfully high to damage a carbon frame.
    It's not about damage to the frame from the pressure. Water is a big issue on carbon composites with aluminum inserts. The water acts as an electrolyte enabling galvanic corrosion in the bonded aluminum/carbon interface. Keeping the frame dry as much as possible will prevent this.

    There's also the plasticizer effect of water on the carbon fiber resin, but this usuallly takes a long time and most frames are protected with a water resistant gel coat.

    (Yes, I do a good amount of aerospace composites to know what I'm talking about.)

    -S

    Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    The water acts as an electrolyte enabling galvanic corrosion in the bonded aluminum/carbon interface. Keeping the frame dry as much as possible will prevent this.

    There's also the plasticizer effect of water on the carbon fiber resin, but this usuallly takes a long time and most frames are protected with a water resistant gel coat.
    Daaanggg... you lost me at "electrolyte." lol jk

    I think I'll (low) power wash my (AL) bike, but I won't point it at anything important.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  10. #35
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    Watched a Sam Hill video and the mechanic stated he tears down the whole bike each night. After practice he will change the wheel bearings, chain, BB and overhaul the fork. every third or fourth day with also swap out cassette and chainrings. Freakin crazy, if I had the resources to change that stuff everyday I would powerwash too.

    They just powerwash to make sure the sponsors get most for their money.

    Also I have seen a long day in the rain ruin HS, wheel, BB bearings in one ride.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    It's not about damage to the frame from the pressure. Water is a big issue on carbon composites with aluminum inserts. The water acts as an electrolyte enabling galvanic corrosion in the bonded aluminum/carbon interface. Keeping the frame dry as much as possible will prevent this.

    There's also the plasticizer effect of water on the carbon fiber resin, but this usuallly takes a long time and most frames are protected with a water resistant gel coat.

    (Yes, I do a good amount of aerospace composites to know what I'm talking about.)

    -S

    Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2
    Ohhhh. I guess I didn't think about that. Seems like more and more carbon bikes these days aren't using any aluminum inserts, but I guess there are still plenty that do have aluminum inserts.

  12. #37
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    Seems like some semantics may help out here. Its not okay to POWERWASH your bike, but it's okay to WASH your bike with a POWERWASHER. Avoid pressure around bearings, forks, chain, etc. If you back up and don't get zealous with the spray gun you can produce a nice mist which could have even lower pressure than your garden hose. Dry off and re-lube. It's a bike. Not a house, or a pink balloon.
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

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