1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #51
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    Yea, I just skipped it cuz I know what works best for me already.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    How was your ride?
    Short and sweet, I woke up late so I only had time to do a 6 mile loop, it was not very technical, mostly flat. I did not have any mishaps due to not getting un-clipped in time. Getting clipped in still takes me a few tries. I did not ride long enough or ride anything technical enough to really compare, the only difference is the odd sensation of being attached to the bike. Hopefully tomorrow I can get my @$$ out of bed early enough to get a good ride in for a legit ride report.

  3. #53
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    The fast bumpy stuff and climbs is where I notice the most difference. ie fast and rooty sections.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBerNick View Post
    1. They are way too easy to "un-clip" so I do not see how this could discourage anyone.

    2. It takes ZERO form to bunny hop. Which is cool for me, bunny hopping is not my strong suit.
    1. if they are truly TOO easy, that can be solved, easily. on spd-type pedals, you can turn a bolt to tighten the pedal's grip on the cleat. or use a cleat with more/less float. on Crank Bros, you can orient the cleat a different way to tighten it up.

    2. doing a bunnyhop and doing a GOOD bunnyhop had nothing to do with your pedals. I can bunnyhop 24" on a bmx bike with platforms but I can probably get 8" on my 29er clipped in. it's all about form and how your bike is set up.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 12-19-2012 at 06:14 AM.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    1. if they are truly TOO easy, that can be solved, easily. on spd-type pedals, you can turn a bolt to tighten the pedal's grip on the cleat. or use a cleat with more/less float. on Crank Bros, you can orient the cleat a different way to tighten it up.

    2. doing a bunnyhop and doing a GOOD bunnyhop had nothing to do with your pedals. I can bunnyhop 24" on a bmx bike with platforms but I can probably get 8" on my 29er clipped in. it's all about form and how your bike is set up.
    1. I have SPD's. I did play with the tension and turned it way up.

    2. But it CAN have alot to do with pedals, I can only do a solid 4 or 5 inches with platforms b/c I don't have good form. While clipped in I just yank on the bars and pull my legs up. If I practiced the same technique on platforms I would be yanking up on the bars and hopping off the pedals.

  6. #56
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    I used to bunny hop on my BMX, but don't really do it much on a mtb/trail riding. Any air I get is usually the same with or without clippless on. Although I can lift the bike while in the air, it was'nt
    one of the reasons I went to them. It is an added bonus I suppose.

  7. #57
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    I like both. I rode in the 90's with toe clips and just started riding again in march. I started with some good flats and about 2 months ago I went clip less.

    I think starting with flats is the best way to go. It allows the ability to learn bike handling skills and removes the mental block of being stuck to a bike.

    I adjusted to clip less after a handful of rides. It's hard to explain but I feel they allow even more bike control in some situations. But I felt I needed to be over the "I know what my bike/body can do" hump to give them an honest try.

    As you've probably read though, people will make a case for either. Try both and draw your own conclusion.
    I hope you have a big trunk... cause I'm gonna put my bike in it!

  8. #58
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    Clips all the way . Road, mountains, no matter.

  9. #59
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    always just been comfortable on platforms just bought a redline monocog flight last week and just getting into mountainbiking and took my old odyssey pedals off of my old bmx and now they are on my redline

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