1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: pinch flats

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    7

    pinch flats

    I got my first pinch flat this past weekend and ended up walking/carrying my wounded bike 4 miles with no spare tube or any means of repair, needless to say I learnt my lesson. I am wondering if there are any steps or tricks to avoiding this kind of flat tire like different air pressures or if it was just something based on luck and is unavoidable?

  2. #2
    .
    Reputation: nomit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,164
    up your air pressure
    or go tubeless

    and always bring a spare tube, tire irons, patch kit, pump and tools.

  3. #3
    ride like you stole it
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    681
    ^ +1 If you like low pressure go tubeless my tires are happily running at 20psi.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    What nomit said.

    Also, use your legs as shock absorbers, and try to ride smoothly. Lighten your bike as you approach rocks. You don't need to get airborne, just push off lightly so that only the bike's weight is banging against the rocks, rather than bike weight plus rider weight. In addition to reducing pinch flats, focusing on smoothness will make you a better rider overall.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,328
    Quote Originally Posted by spcarter
    ^ +1 If you like low pressure go tubeless my tires are happily running at 20psi.
    +1. im all for tubeless. had 2 pinch flats in 2 rides... that was the line. im a light person (135lbs) and i was running fairly high pressures (32psi) with steel beaded tires.

    tubeless is expensive so i did the ghetto method.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM7gq1fcoQ

    i know i throw this vid around a lot but it seemed to have helped a lot of people. have fun. remember your tire fixing kit next time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •