1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6

    Picked up a Cannondale Super V700. Could use some beginner advice.

    Well I was in the market for a mountain bike to ride around and commute a bit with.

    I bought a Cannondale Super V700 for $100.

    Got it yesterday. Was pretty dirty.




    Here is how I got after I cleaned it up.


    There are a few things I could use some advice/opinions on:

    1. What exact model is this bike? I know this sounds stupid but I can't seem to find the EXACT year.
    2. What kind of front and rear shock is that? I am pretty sure I need to replace the front one soon.
    3. Where could I get disc brake setup for it?
    4. What kind of bike chain grease should I use? Also what kind of ball bearings are in the back wheel and what kind of grease?
    5. What kind of tires do you recommend? I am pretty sure the ones I have are a bit shot.
    6. Is there any kind of repair/maintenance manual?

    Thanks,
    Alan

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    20
    2JZ no sh!t sorry, couldnt resist.

    check here for some info, Vintage Cannondale - Information and Help

    also BikePedia

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by STidrvr View Post
    2JZ no sh!t sorry, couldnt resist.

    check here for some info, Vintage Cannondale - Information and Help

    also BikePedia
    Thanks for the list. I had the majority of that information already though.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,644
    The front shock is a Cannondale only model called headshock ,they still use them . Check with your LBS that has Cannondales they should be able to rebuild it. While you are there ask about what tires are being used in the area. They could tell you more about the shock. All kinds of lube /grease out there and they all pretty much the same ,again ask the shop what they use.You would need to replace the fork and the front wheel to to use a disc brake . Check the Park tool web site or Sheldon Brown for repair info.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    The front shock is a Cannondale only model called headshock ,they still use them . Check with your LBS that has Cannondales they should be able to rebuild it. While you are there ask about what tires are being used in the area. They could tell you more about the shock. All kinds of lube /grease out there and they all pretty much the same ,again ask the shop what they use.You would need to replace the fork and the front wheel to to use a disc brake . Check the Park tool web site or Sheldon Brown for repair info.
    I can check out my local bike shop and see what they say. Honestly though, I was looking for more of a DIY approach and information. I have all the tools and figured it would be similar to rebuilding a motorcycle suspension. I can also easily have anything welded since I have access to a welder and machine shop.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    20
    The vintage site will help figure out what range of years it is by the serial number, then you can take that info to bikepedia and even cannondales site with older catalogs to get you the EXACT year of the bike by comparing components and colors.

    Like ranger said, check out Sheldon Browns site for the shock rebuild. One word of caution. I know you said you have "tools" and a "welder and machine shop". But let me be the first to tell you that its not that simple. Once you start to dig into things, your going to find that you do not have specialty tools. Sure there are work around for some, but others you risk damaging components. Tools like chain whips and cassette wrenches come in handy and castle nut wrenches for the shock disasemblely (if applicable). Yes you can take them to the shop to have them done for you, but just plan ahead for "downtime". Its one thing if you plan on turning this into a hobby, then the investment is worth it, atleast for me it is.

  7. #7
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,767
    If you want to do some tinkering with that frame, you may want to look up the "Uber V" conversions many have done to those older Super V frames. Basically, they replace the stock swingarm with one from a Jekyll. It will increase rear travel to around 6"+/-. Then replace the Headshock with a 6" travel conventional fork and you have a very trail worthy rig that will also be disc brake capable.

    Details here:

    Post your UBER V !!!!!!!!!!!

    and here:

    UBER V Technical Information

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by STidrvr View Post
    The vintage site will help figure out what range of years it is by the serial number, then you can take that info to bikepedia and even cannondales site with older catalogs to get you the EXACT year of the bike by comparing components and colors.

    Like ranger said, check out Sheldon Browns site for the shock rebuild. One word of caution. I know you said you have "tools" and a "welder and machine shop". But let me be the first to tell you that its not that simple. Once you start to dig into things, your going to find that you do not have specialty tools. Sure there are work around for some, but others you risk damaging components. Tools like chain whips and cassette wrenches come in handy and castle nut wrenches for the shock disasemblely (if applicable). Yes you can take them to the shop to have them done for you, but just plan ahead for "downtime". Its one thing if you plan on turning this into a hobby, then the investment is worth it, atleast for me it is.
    Already have a chain wrench and ordered a set of cassette wrench keys. Also still have my wrenches from when I rebuilt my triple adjustable coilovers. I don't see how there could be anymore special tools outside of that since I already disassembled the bike.

    Also the "welder" and "machine shop" comment was geared towards installing disc brakes since there is no brackets for the caliper on this frame. I could get away with aftermarket front forks that have the bracket already but the rears could get tricky unless I got a new trailing arm. The wheels hubs hold the rotors so nothing too complicated there.

    After reading the forums, sites and watching several YouTube videos, it doesn't look that hard. Going to break put the telescoping set and micrometers to make sure the parts I get will fit.

    Thanks for the help


    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    If you want to do some tinkering with that frame, you may want to look up the "Uber V" conversions many have done to those older Super V frames. Basically, they replace the stock swingarm with one from a Jekyll. It will increase rear travel to around 6"+/-. Then replace the Headshock with a 6" travel conventional fork and you have a very trail worthy rig that will also be disc brake capable.


    Details here:


    Post your UBER V !!!!!!!!!!!


    and here:


    UBER V Technical Information
    Sweet thanks man! This will give me a good idea about dimensions and what's been done already!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,644
    Bikes are pretty simple ,it seems that you know how to use a wrench. A couple things, the hubs that are in the pics don't have the flanges needed the bolt on rotors,you might be able to make some kind of adapter but those hubs weren't designed for the loads that they would see. You could weld on some tabs on the fork to mount the caliper but again that fork wasn't designed to handle those loads ,also if it's aluminum it would need to be reheat treated. I would think twice about hanging those parts on a frame that wasn't designed for that much travel,it could work but how well? I would ride as is ,then look at getting a different bike when you out grow it or get tire of it.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Bikes are pretty simple ,it seems that you know how to use a wrench. A couple things, the hubs that are in the pics don't have the flanges needed the bolt on rotors,you might be able to make some kind of adapter but those hubs weren't designed for the loads that they would see. You could weld on some tabs on the fork to mount the caliper but again that fork wasn't designed to handle those loads ,also if it's aluminum it would need to be reheat treated. I would think twice about hanging those parts on a frame that wasn't designed for that much travel,it could work but how well? I would ride as is ,then look at getting a different bike when you out grow it or get tire of it.
    Yeah I am just going to get a front fork that has provisions already for a caliper. The rear I could just make a bracket so no welding required. As for the wheels, after researching, it would be cheaper and easier just to get hubs/wheels that have disc provisions already as well.

    Seems like upgrading this bike was a lot simpler than I thought.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,244
    That ancient bike is not worth too much. I wouldn't spend too much moeny trying to fix it up when you can get a perfectly good used bike for about $600 of a recent model year.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    That ancient bike is not worth too much. I wouldn't spend too much moeny trying to fix it up when you can get a perfectly good used bike for about $600 of a recent model year.
    I mean the frame is solid and it rides right now as is perfect.

    Honestly, I plan on upgrading with parts I find cheap on eBay and craigslist when I find them. I figure $60 for the front shock w/ adapter and caliper provisions (don't really care which one), $35 for Avid BB7 w/ linear brake levers, $50 for wheels with disc brake provisions.

    Not really that bad considering I got it for $100. Might even get a new swing arm for $50 and shock for $30. (these are prices I found from the uber threads).

    If I spent $600, I would get a bike and then spent money to modify it anyways. On top of that, if I don't want to spend the money, I do t have it. Can just ride it and call it quits.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,644
    It's great that you have ideas on how to upgrade the bike ,a couple of us have suggested that you just ride it as is . Spending money on someting new is easy to do ,finding out that you don't like the sport or have time to use the stuff you bought is hard leason. Good luck with the bike and riding.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirkdaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    407
    For the OP's purpose of "riding around and commuting" he doesn't exactly need 5-6" of travel OR disk brakes! I would just get a new chain and clean everything, adjust brakes and derail's, air up the tires and go. Yea, could uber-v the thing but just enjoy for $100 steal. If you don't want it I'd buy it.

    ps. I got a used ultra fatty headshok here on classifieds that had a disk mount, and my ancient cannondale I have now a rim brake on rear and disk in front as the fork had no rim brake mounts, my old fork was not rebuildable supposedly. If it holds air, go with it. I used my original '93 headshock (air / oil) for many many years care-free only occasional air pressure.

Similar Threads

  1. Beginner - Just picked up a Revel 1
    By Krunk_Kracker in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-02-2013, 09:44 PM
  2. Just picked up my new Cannondale Trail SL2!
    By strohman in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-24-2012, 05:46 AM
  3. Beginner needs help with Cannondale F700
    By CDaleF700 in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-06-2011, 08:45 PM
  4. Advice on Updating a '94 Cannondale Super V 3000
    By marshcroft in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-06-2011, 04:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •