1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Are pedals universal?

    I just spent 30 minutes screwing my brains out trying to get my new Vault DMR pedals on my Yeti. I screwed backward, I screwed forward....no go.

    This fruitless effort was made worse by the fact that as I helplessly watched, the sun slid behind the horizon and my limited riding time evaporated.

    Plus I think I had a small stroke. On the positive side, my head did not actually explode.
    Last edited by PixieChik; 12-03-2012 at 02:50 PM.
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  2. #2
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    The thread on a pedal is universally 9/16-20, for all 3 piece cranks on modern bikes. There is a left and a right pedal. One has reverse thread, most have a stamp with L or R to help you out on this one. I have done this as well

    Unless you have an old bike with an older crank, read pre 80's, with a funky crank, all threads are the same.
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

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  3. #3
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    Almost all MTB pedals are 9/16 thread. The the thread rotation is different per side, the right side threads in traditionally (righty-tighty) the left side is opposite(lefty-tighty). Hope this helps.

  4. #4
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    Screw right pedal to right crank arm, left pedal to left crank arm( left threaded )

  5. #5
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    I knew I was missing something. I must have succeeded by dumb luck on previous pedal installations.

    Thanks.
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  6. #6
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    Good grief. I finally figured out right and left by looking it upon the DMR website.

    I was baffled by the smooth circular cuff on the pedal. No crescent wrench flat spots- how to screw it in? I tried my fingers, duh-that didn't work. Adjustable wrench- that couldn't be right, it was going to scratch up the cuff and potentially mangle the threads. Finally my husband suggested an Allen tool. It's inserted in the inside end of the pedal. How awkward.

    ( my husband laughed and told me I need a husband when I asked him what I was doing wrong. He is used to me trying to do things without his help- he just stands back and shakes his head.)

    But the pedals are on and I learned something new.

    Sometimes it sucks being a girl (but not all the time). It seems like men are born knowing things that are a mystery to me.
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  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    Almost. Most of us just start tinkering at a young age and figure things out, or we help our fathers at a young age. My sister is almost as mechanically capable as I am, and only because she didn't start with mechanical stuff until I left the house when she was 14. She's better with mechanical things than with domestic things. Her husband is the one who knits and has no mechanical skills at all (not kidding).

    I have many skills. I can wrench on a bike or a car, and I can sew (or, use a thread injector to make gear, yeah).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    Sometimes it sucks being a girl (but not all the time). It seems like men are born knowing things that are a mystery to me.
    Theres as many guys are clueless to bike stuff as women, guys are worse as they try and act as if they know

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  10. #10
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    Pedals we get. Women? Not so much.

  11. #11
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    So now that you have them on, did you grease the threads before you installed them? It's sort of important...
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GelatiCruiser View Post
    Pedals we get. Women? Not so much.
    Heehee...yup.

    You're f*cking with me on the grease, right? They seemed kind of clear-greasy but I didn't actually put any grease on them. Why is that important?
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  13. #13
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    You need grease so that it won't seize in the crank over time from corrosion and crap. No joke, it should be applied.

    Its good you try stuff, better than the wife that is always just asking you to do things without even trying. Though I also must admit to snickering at my wife a little when she does stuff like what you are going through.
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    Heehee...yup.

    You're f*cking with me on the grease, right? They seemed kind of clear-greasy but I didn't actually put any grease on them. Why is that important?
    Like Guerdonian said, if you ever want them to come off they need to be greased. Remember that if it has threads, then you need grease or anti-seize or Locktite or something. If you don't you risk those threads never coming undone.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    I just spent 30 minutes screwing my brains......... I screwed backward, I screwed forward....no go.


    I had a small stroke. On the positive side, my head did not actually explode.
    I am glad you got them on.....I have a problem with right and left so it always takes me a while to figure it out....simplest thing is to just change one at a time that way you can compare the threads and figure it out easy.

    Fixed the OP for you.

    Anit seize or grease, makes it easy to get off later....the white bike grease is probably easiest. nickel based anit-sieze probably works the best.

  16. #16
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    OK, back to square...seven. I'll check with my LBS bike boys to get the appropriate greasy substance.
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  17. #17
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    If you want on "do all" grease I would recommend the park tools Polylube. Works for many bicycle maintenance applications, I have had good luck with it:
    Park Tool Co. PPL-1 : PolyLube 1000 Lubricant (Tube) : Cleaning & Lube
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    OK, back to square...seven. I'll check with my LBS bike boys to get the appropriate greasy substance.
    Motor oil? Petroleum jelly? Baby oil? Cooking oil? Crisco? Butter? Lard? They all work as an anti sieze in a pinch, especially when you are not subjecting it to high temps.

    As a woman you should at least know where you keep some of those on the list above.

    -S

  19. #19
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    I have a tube of Phil Wood waterproof grease (the green stuff) that has lasted me several years. It's done well for me over that time.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    I..snip.. nickel based anit-sieze probably works the best.
    I don't have the cans in front of me to check.

    I have a feeling Nickel based anti seize is not good for aluminum and the copper based ones are better.

    I just use grease on my bikes. Some say this is the go Bel-Ray Waterproof Grease
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    I just spent 30 minutes screwing my brains out trying to get my new Vault DMR pedals on my Yeti. I screwed backward, I screwed forward....no go.

    This fruitless effort was made worse by the fact that as I helplessly watched, the sun slid behind the horizon and my limited riding time evaporated.

    Plus I think I had a small stroke. On the positive side, my head did not actually explode.
    Go on ...

    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    Good grief. I finally figured out right and left by looking it upon the DMR website.

    I was baffled by the smooth circular cuff on the pedal. No crescent wrench flat spots- how to screw it in? I tried my fingers, duh-that didn't work. Adjustable wrench- that couldn't be right, it was going to scratch up the cuff and potentially mangle the threads. Finally my husband suggested an Allen tool. It's inserted in the inside end of the pedal. How awkward.

    ( my husband laughed and told me I need a husband when I asked him what I was doing wrong. He is used to me trying to do things without his help- he just stands back and shakes his head.)

    But the pedals are on and I learned something new.

    Sometimes it sucks being a girl (but not all the time). It seems like men are born knowing things that are a mystery to me.
    In the future, to identify which pedal is which, hold them both with the spindles (the threaded parts) pointing upwards. If you look closely at the threads, you'll see that they are not exactly parallel with the ground, rather, they slant ever so slightly. On the left pedal, the threads slant slightly up toward your left. On the right pedal, the threads slant slightly up toward your right hand.

    Also, many mechanics actually prefer to use an allen key on the end of the spindle, myself included. A couple reasons for this are:

    - If you're in a hurry, it's faster, because you can just twist the allen key to thread them on or off very quickly.
    - You don't have to have a pedal wrench. Just allen keys, which you should have anyway.
    - You don't have to worry about scratching the crank arm, which is very easy to do with a pedal wrench.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Almost. Most of us just start tinkering at a young age and figure things out
    My mother still tells the story of the "Day my father got a new lawnmower." Apparently he spent over an hour trying to get the grass-catcher bag on the back. I walked up (6-8yo at the time), said "let me try" and put it on in 10 seconds flat.

    I am told he didn't know whether to be proud or cry.

  23. #23
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    . There is a left and a right pedal.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by corbidougu View Post
    . There is a left and a right pedal.
    Uhh ... thanks Helpy Helperton. We've got that figured out already.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Motor oil? Petroleum jelly? Baby oil? Cooking oil? Crisco? Butter? Lard? They all work as an anti sieze in a pinch, especially when you are not subjecting it to high temps....S
    I find this to be generally bad advise. Thin oils will wash out over time. Cooking oils/"greases" can dry our over time (ask my niece that used Pam on her sewing machine).

    To the OP...In the future, you might find the "how to's" at Park Tool helpful for working on your bike. Most things are covered. Congrats on doing things yourself.

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