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Thread: Pedals

  1. #1
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    Pedals

    I am new to mountain biking and I am just wondering is there rider weight limit on pedals. I know this sounds stupid just wondering I see that crankbrothers pedals all look close to the same but the price seems to go up with the number. Can someone tell me why.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Gouda Cheez's Avatar
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    Pedals

    One reason is different materials, weight differences, etc. I have the 'lower quality' 50/50 pedals and I love them, for what it's worth.

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    If you dig further for the specs, most manufacturers do have maximum weights listed. I use Time pedals and I know they do. In general, the lighter weight models using exotic materials (titanium, etc) will be more expensive, but at the same time, will usually have a lower maximum rider weight rating.

  4. #4
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    If you want lightweight pedals at a low price, try the Wellgo MG-1

    In the UK they only cost about 30 and are very good for the money. The bearings are good and they look OK, plus the pins are replaceable. And they weigh under 400g.

    They are not as good as the pedals I replaced them with, but these cost 70 so you'd not expect them to be.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys for the response.

  6. #6
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    Titanium shaft pedals are the only ones I've ever heard of any suggested rider weight limits on. Stick with the stainless or cromoly steel shaft versions and you'll never have a problem.
    2013 Salsa El Mariachi 29er
    1995 Giant CFR Team Road Bike
    2001 Bianchi Volpe
    2009 KX250F ... 2004 KDX200

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    Thanks for the post titanium is a little out of the budget anyway was just wondering on the other pedals,

  8. #8
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    I'll tell you this, avoid the crank brothers pedals.

    Not that they are bad, but in my opinion, they have a major design flaw. They are a good pedal for beginners, but not for an advanced rider, or anyone who wants to get better.
    Reason? No adjustable tension. I ran the Candys when I got my '08 Fuel, because I did not want to spend a lot. The four sided design is good for ease of pedal entry, but that design creates the major function flaw. While there are 4 entry points, the entire thing is only made from two bars. So, your cleat interfaced section is directly tied into the other three cleat openings. If the underside of the pedal touches anything, it splays apart the entire locking mechanism, and your cleats will unclip. I have had it happen to me more times than I care to count. On SPD style, they have only two entry points, but they are completely independant of one another. If the open entry point is spread apart, it does not affect the other one, unlike the Egg-Beater style.

    The lack of adjustable tension caused me to almost go down a few weeks ago too, when bunny hopping a small log at speed. Clicked out and went on the saddle hard. I ordered a set of Shimano XT pedals right after that ride (eBay 75 bucks) and am keeping the Candys as an emergency backup pedal. I came from Shimano M747's, which I still think are the best clipless mountain pedals ever made, but the new XT pedals are excellent.

    Don't skimp TOO much on pedals, you can regret it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    I'll tell you this, avoid the crank brothers pedals.

    Not that they are bad, but in my opinion, they have a major design flaw. They are a good pedal for beginners, but not for an advanced rider, or anyone who wants to get better.
    Reason? No adjustable tension. I ran the Candys when I got my '08 Fuel, because I did not want to spend a lot. The four sided design is good for ease of pedal entry, but that design creates the major function flaw. While there are 4 entry points, the entire thing is only made from two bars. So, your cleat interfaced section is directly tied into the other three cleat openings. If the underside of the pedal touches anything, it splays apart the entire locking mechanism, and your cleats will unclip. I have had it happen to me more times than I care to count. On SPD style, they have only two entry points, but they are completely independant of one another. If the open entry point is spread apart, it does not affect the other one, unlike the Egg-Beater style.

    The lack of adjustable tension caused me to almost go down a few weeks ago too, when bunny hopping a small log at speed. Clicked out and went on the saddle hard. I ordered a set of Shimano XT pedals right after that ride (eBay 75 bucks) and am keeping the Candys as an emergency backup pedal. I came from Shimano M747's, which I still think are the best clipless mountain pedals ever made, but the new XT pedals are excellent.

    Don't skimp TOO much on pedals, you can regret it.

    I have the Mallets and have not experienced that issue. Have you contacted CB... They are very helpful.

    IMHO the HT flats smoke the 50/50 but CB makes a great clipless pedal.

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