1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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Thread: Pedals!!

  1. #1
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    Pedals!!

    I have decided to get with the program and get some clipless pedals for my 29er.

    Most of my riding is trails, less than 10% would be single track. I think I would prefer a pedal that is half platform half cliplessin case I wanted to ride with regular shoes. I was thinking something like the Shimano M324 but I am open to any suggestions.

    Shouold I bother messing with half / half or just go all the way? Which ones pedals in particular? Want to keep them under $75.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Don't go half clipless/half platform...they suck and your always looking down to pick the correct size. Look at the Crank Bros Acid or Mallet pedals. They are double sided and yet are still easy enough to ride without being clipped in (especially the Mallet) without the mechanism bothering the bottom of your feet.

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    My favorites are Time ATACs. The Z would be another option. I haven't tried it myself, so read some reviews...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    Don't go half clipless/half platform...they suck and your always looking down to pick the correct size. Look at the Crank Bros Acid or Mallet pedals. They are double sided and yet are still easy enough to ride without being clipped in (especially the Mallet) without the mechanism bothering the bottom of your feet.
    Just what I would have said.

    Think the acid would be better for road. On trail think they might not be grippy enough or even slippery to ride unclipped. A much better option than dual purpose pedal like Wam D-10 or the likes.
    IMO, Crank Bros Mallets is the way to go.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Just what I would have said.

    Think the acid would be better for road. On trail think they might not be grippy enough or even slippery to ride unclipped. A much better option than dual purpose pedal like Wam D-10 or the likes.
    IMO, Crank Bros Mallets is the way to go.
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    I love mine, won't go back to any of the others
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  6. #6
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    Some say going clipless is dangerous. Any advise? Is there a model for beginners? I just started riding.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    MTB is dangerous. Driving a car is dangerous. Being a pedestrian is dangerous.

    I think I have more control on clipless than flat pedals, and they're a lot better than toe clips were. Most people have a couple stupid falls before they get clipping out into their muscle memory. I find that my pedals generally have a magic ability to disengage if I really wipe out. Kind of like the bindings on skis.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    MTB is dangerous. Driving a car is dangerous. Being a pedestrian is dangerous.

    I think I have more control on clipless than flat pedals, and they're a lot better than toe clips were. Most people have a couple stupid falls before they get clipping out into their muscle memory. I find that my pedals generally have a magic ability to disengage if I really wipe out. Kind of like the bindings on skis.
    Did you go straight using clip pedals when you started biking? I'm quite confident now riding but I fear the idea of falling down clipped with the bike. In short, what's the cue that I can start riding with clips? thanks for the advise.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tenspot View Post
    Shouold I bother messing with half / half or just go all the way? Which ones pedals in particular? Want to keep them under $75.

    Thanks

    Maybe just over Shimano M770 XT Clipless SPD Pedals From $73.05 and $10 post
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  10. #10
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Get some of these:

    Shimano PD-M520 Pedal at JensonUSA.com

    and some of these:

    Shimano SM-SH56 Multi Release SPD Cleat at JensonUSA.com

    The multi-release cleats will release from different directions as you learn to ride clipless. Good cleats for learning and M520 pedals are good pedals for riders of any level..

    Agree completely with mtnbiker72 regarding the combo pedals. Save your money on those.

  11. #11
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    This is an excellent thread!
    I say flat pedals w/ duct tape - start @ one wrap for when you're first learning to tear-away easy in a crash ( dunno why, no one crashes in clip-more pedals)...anyways keep wrapping more layers as you ger more GNAR - you can tell when your recycle bin is full of either Mt. Dew bottles, or Keystone cans.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    Get some of these:

    Shimano PD-M520 Pedal at JensonUSA.com

    and some of these:

    Shimano SM-SH56 Multi Release SPD Cleat at JensonUSA.com

    The multi-release cleats will release from different directions as you learn to ride clipless. Good cleats for learning and M520 pedals are good pedals for riders of any level..

    Agree completely with mtnbiker72 regarding the combo pedals. Save your money on those.
    THIS ^^^^^^ SH56 cleats with pedal adjustment screw backed off are stupid easy to get out of - you just pull your foot out any which way - zero learning curve. Tighten the adjustment screw as you get used to them.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus View Post
    Did you go straight using clip pedals when you started biking? I'm quite confident now riding but I fear the idea of falling down clipped with the bike. In short, what's the cue that I can start riding with clips? thanks for the advise.
    Nope. I learned to ride bikes when I was little, same as everyone else, then didn't ride for a long time. I was a bookish little kid. I'm a nerdy adult, too, but developed much more of an interest in sports as a teenager. I rode bikes to school for a while when I was in high school and college and used flat pedals, then toe clips. I don't think I'd had my first mountain bike for very long when I bought my first set of clipless pedals and shoes, but I did ride it with clips and straps for a while, at least. That kind of pedal really sucks if you're not actually using the straps, and either the current style of flat pedal, with the huge platform and all the pins, hadn't come out yet, or none of my friends used them. Certainly I didn't know about them.

    You're going to fall down clipped into the bike. Either because you slowed down and forgot, or one of those goofy low-speed climbing falls. The forgetful fall is embarrassing if you do it in front of someone, but no worse than every other MTB fall. Same with the slow climbing fall. In years of riding, bailing out into the bushes, and occasional really spectacular falls, I think I've had about two that I think were made worse by being clipped in. In reality, at least with a system like the Time ATAC, in which the cleats can release in both directions, in a big, spectacular fall, people come unclipped.

    Something I did a little over a year ago, that I think really helped my riding, was to get a set of BMX-style flat pedals - as in, the ones that are supposed to be ridden that way, and not crappy test ride pedals or cage pedals without the toe clip. I actually didn't spend a ton of time on them, but I practiced some technical skills that I was afraid to on toe clips, like wheelies, and that I'd become reliant on toe clips to perform, like bunny hops. Learning to work with drivetrain torque and weight transfer is important to being a smooth mountain biker, IME, and not being able to pull up on the pedals makes it harder to cheat. Being able to do technical skills correctly and cleanly means they cost a lot less energy and timing is easier - the whole riding experience becomes easier, potentially faster, and more fun.

    Bla bla bla. I'm rambling. I think if there's a cue that you're ready to start riding with toe clips, it's that you're stable enough to ride on roads and lawns without wandering or having to put your foot down. Really. Just don't discount flat pedals either, and don't judge them based on how sucky it is to ride crappy ones. The big deal with clipless pedals is that you need to be clipped in to use most models effectively, and most of the shoes have crappy grip if they're not clipped in. So if you're approaching something that intimidates you, you need to just do it. Or stop, figure out an approach, and then start far enough back to get clipped in and have some sort of rhythm going. Ultimately, everything about a bike is just a tool. A very cool one that I love to ride, but not something to mystify either.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus View Post
    Did you go straight using clip pedals when you started biking? I'm quite confident now riding but I fear the idea of falling down clipped with the bike. In short, what's the cue that I can start riding with clips? thanks for the advise.

    Rode for a month or so to get used to the bike, after that went clipless.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus View Post
    Did you go straight using clip pedals when you started biking? I'm quite confident now riding but I fear the idea of falling down clipped with the bike. In short, what's the cue that I can start riding with clips? thanks for the advise.
    I bought my bike and went clipless the same day. I was told that I would go clipless eventually and to start with them as soon as you can. I have only fell twice getting used to them and the only major crash I have had with them, they unclipped themselves. It only took a few rides for me to not be constantly thinking about them.

  16. #16
    r00
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    You could try riding with toestraps first, then get clipless later.. That was my progression a long time ago, flat, then toestraps (for like a month), then clipless. The best part about clipless is "pedaling in circles", giving you more power throughout your pedal range, so in addition to pushing down, you're pulling up as well.

  17. #17
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    I have ridden with cages (clips) for years.

    Right now I am between CB Candy 1s and the shimano m530.


    How is the longevity of these? reviews are mixed.

  18. #18
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    wow thanks for the advises especially to AndrwSwitch for taking time. I'm encouraged. I guess my real fear is to fall again, clipless or not. I fell hard on my first week of riding. Left some nasty marks on my knees. Need some more practice and a good set of clipless pedals to begin with.

  19. #19
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    AndrwSwitch has some good advice.

    I was a newbie a few years back and jumped onto clips like every bike shop Ive been tells you to and ended up not having the confidence to ride difficult bits, I then went back to flat pedals.

    There are really two choices of pedals, BMX/downhill style pedals that have a lot of grip but are flat/not clipped in are great for progressing on, especially on technical descents, where knowing you can get off in a hurry makes a huge boost to confidence.

    Clipped in pedals (i jump between running crank brothers and spds, both do the job fine) are great when you are confident in the trails you ride. They make you commit to the line, make you pedal more efficient but do nothing for confidence when you get out of your depth.

    I am not a fan of toe straps (i would rather run spds set to a loose setting) and flat pedals of the non downhill style with little grip dont help your riding either.

    If you find your have many difficult descents and confidence is a problem (as it should be when you are learning!) then buy some down hill flats (wellgo V8 copies are great value).

    If you are mostly confident on the trails you ride, buy some clipless pedal.

  20. #20
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    Don't go half/half or your clipess/SPD pedal experience will be a rubbish one. Get some proper, double sided clipless/SPD pedals and you'll never go back!

    Should you want to ride with normal shoes, it's a 2min job to swap back to your current pedals

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by robdeanhove View Post
    Don't go half/half or your clipess/SPD pedal experience will be a rubbish one. Get some proper, double sided clipless/SPD pedals and you'll never go back!

    Should you want to ride with normal shoes, it's a 2min job to swap back to your current pedals
    The saying is for the ladies, and it goes, Once you go black, you'll never go back. LOL
    I have gone clippless for years and went back. Not for lack of confidence. I still ride clipless on one of my mtbs, and all my road bikes. but my other current 3 mtbs have platforms. So it depends on the person and how/where they like to ride.

    As far as changing pedals......Sure you can change em in a few minutes, if they were put on right, with a dab of grease and not over tightened, but IMO, it's not a good idea to keep switching if you like your crankset.

    And yes, Andrew always puts a good effort and info into his posts.

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    And yes, Andrew always puts a good effort and info into his posts.
    His posts are always among the more useful ones. Unfortunatunately, I am unable to add to his reputation now, until I rep a lot more other people...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  23. #23
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    i bought a Shimano multi release Sh56 to partner with a 2012 XT pedal. Will try this and post my experience as a first-timer. Is this a good combination?

  24. #24
    local trails rider
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    XT pedals should be good. Multi release is OK if you want multi relese.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  25. #25
    The perfessor
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    I have a pair half-and-half pedals: Wellgo WPD-95B pedals, platform on one side, clipless on the other for when I take my bike on vacation and ride around whatever town I am visiting.......some people here say use one or the other, but half-n-half are really great for my type of use...............that said, I have thought about using some Crank Bros. mallets for the same practicality.........
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