1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: Pedals

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4

    New question here. Pedals

    I'm pretty new to the mountain biking seen and am really enjoying myself. I got an 06 giant yukon at the start of the season and i'm having a blast so far. Does anyone have any suggestions for new pedals? Are they necessary, i've been doing mostly mountain singletrack in colorado and I thought that they might help. Any suggestions appreciated, thanks-

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MrMook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    290
    If you want to upgrade, I'd recommend going with a set of "clipless" pedals. These are the type that require special shoes with a cleat bolted to the bottom that the pedal clamps onto. They are called "Clipless" because they eliminate the need for "toe clips"...those are the straps that hold your street shoe to a platform pedal.

    My first pair were a crappy set of no-name SPD pedals I bought off a friend for 20 bucks. SPD is a common system used by Shimano, and some other brands.
    Most pedals will require a specific cleat that will come with the pedals. This cleat can attach to any MTB shoe, which you will also need.

    Is it worth it? YES.
    Once you get used to the in and out movements, you'll never go back. You get more power, more efficient pedaling, and your feet wont bounce out of the pedals on rough decents, or when clearing obstacles. You will probably fall a few times in your back yard when you're learning, but after a few days, you'll be a pro.

    I reccomend CrankBrothers Egg Beater pedals. I think you can find their base models at around $40 online. They wont clog up with mud, and the design is so simple, there's very little that can go wrong (low maintainence). I had to re-build my crappy SPD pedals twice a year because they kept failing.

    Pedals are probably the largest bang-fo-ya-buck upgrade you can make to a stock bike. You might be able to pick up pedals and shoes for around $100-150. Spend more on the shoes.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    6,736

    A clipless upgrade would....

    be a good idea if you want to try them. But, DON'T go Egg Beaters, or Tyme pedals for your first set!!!! These pedals do not have adjustable release tension!!! This can be a problem for a beginner as the release tension on Beaters and Tymes is a bit stiff. I would recommend a set of Shimano 520's for your first set. Good quality and durable, yet affordable. Release tension is adjustable from very easy, to very stiff. This allows for an easy release from the pedals when first starting out, and you can increase the release tension as you gain experience and get used to them. Also both EB's and Tymes have quite a bit more float. Float is the amount that your foot can rotate before you actually engage the release. It requires a more pornounced rotation of the foot to realease from the pedals. Shimano pedals use a standard 5 degree float, that requires very little rotation of the foot to engage the release. This is a good thing for the beginner you won't be used to rotating your foot to get out of the pedals. It will be easier to get used to clipping out with less float. Once you are used to clipless you can easily try something different if you like and it won't take you half the time to get used to the increased float as you'll already be used to the proper motion.

    Just a suggestion, but in my experience beginners do better on Shimano clipless pedals to start with. They are easier to use in the beginning. From there you can stick with em or try something different if you like.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,448
    I'll personally never use clipless, because my type of riding does not warrant them nor would they be safe to use in such situations(I do mainly dirt jumps, street riding, light downhill, 4X racing and skatepark riding) so my recommendation will be for a flat pedal: Animal Hamilton Sealed, great pedal, lots of grip, concave, and you can pick any colour you want!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for the tips guys, I'll probably pick up a set at my lbs next weekend. Happy riding

  6. #6
    Long-Haired Freak
    Reputation: Bakemono's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29
    If you do a lot of climbing, clipless is the only way to go, but if you do mostly downhill then clipless really isnt going to gain you much.
    Ive just got standard platform pedals on my Cannondale, but Im looking for upgrade to clipless sometime soon.
    One who conquers himself is greater than another who conquers a thousand times a thousand on the battlefield.
    - The Buddha

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NoVA_JB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    180
    I've used Power Grip straps for years, I don't want to have special shoes just to ride and they are easy to get in and out of and they are only $20.00 http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...All%20Products

    You can also get ones already attached to pedals for $39.00
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    403
    I ride platforms. My buddies tell me to get some clipless pedals but I dont think I ever will. The only real advantage I see is more power. WHile I do a good amount of climbing more power really does not interst me. I lug my 30+ lb bike up the hill almost as fast as my buddies get their hardtails with clipless pedals up. I like the freedom platforms bring, I also communte to school and work, and its nice to ride my bike in any shoes I want. Weather they be my riding shoes, or doc martens.

    I ride Easton Flatboys, with 5.10 shoes, and sometimes its almost too much grip.

  9. #9
    College Boy
    Reputation: Timeless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeyMT
    I ride platforms. My buddies tell me to get some clipless pedals but I dont think I ever will. The only real advantage I see is more power. WHile I do a good amount of climbing more power really does not interst me. I lug my 30+ lb bike up the hill almost as fast as my buddies get their hardtails with clipless pedals up. I like the freedom platforms bring, I also communte to school and work, and its nice to ride my bike in any shoes I want. Weather they be my riding shoes, or doc martens.

    I ride Easton Flatboys, with 5.10 shoes, and sometimes its almost too much grip.

    more power is not the big advantage. It is a control issue. You need to remeber you are physicly lock with you bike. This allows you to move the back wheel with a lot of easy and when going down a very bump section of trail you are not bounced off your pedals.

    Once you get adjusted to clipless you never want to go back and you will see when you ride plateforms again that you just do not feel as secure on them or as locked in.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    403
    I guess I can see the rear wheel control point. But I don't see that being an advantage for the type of riding I do. But the secure on the pedals I do not agree with. I never have isues with my feet sliping off, even in wet conditions.

    Im most worried about going over the bars with clipless, or falling over in a rock garden and working myself

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbhermit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    290
    You need to let us all know what you're looking at - clipless or platforms? That will stop the never ending clipless vs platforms debate!

    If you're out riding just for fitness and fun I imagine you'll probably be looking at a better set of platforms than what your bike came with.

    My suggestion would be to look at a few below (I've very happy with DMR V12 Mags but depends on your budget).

    Azonic A Frame
    Wellgo B52 or similar
    DMR (V8, V12, V12Mag)
    Shimano DX

    there are heaps more out there that you could choose from, and a lot of it is personal preference and having shoes with relatively soft rubber on the sole (my Addidas Galaxy sneakers never slip off). Also if you want a relatively light pedal (most are normally around 500g per set) you may want to look for Magnesium versions of any brand you're interested in. Other things to look for are sealed or unsealed bearings, replaceable or non replaceable pins. If none of that matters to you than most cheaper ones from reputable brands will do the job just fine.

    I tried the Crank Brothers Candies for a year, could never get 100% confidence in riding clipped to the bike, I had all your typical little falls from stalling going up a hard hill etc. I had one big fall where neither leg uncliped and popped the knees out of joint, that was really the last straw, I did not want to risk anything like that happening again. When I switched to platforms it was amazing to have the freedom of riding back, pushing it around corners knowing I can throw a leg out if need be and trying new things on the bike. My current shoe & pedal combo never slips, I haven't really needed knee / shin guards even though the pedals have sharp pins, but this is more so because I rarely fall over now that I'm no longer clipped in! Only downside is not being able to pull up on the pedals but for me I don't think riding was any more efficient really as I found it was purely a case of using a different set of muscles when one set got tired - if I was in some serious training schedule or racing then sure I would have developed a more efficient technique.

    Sorry for the ramble on, plenty of choice out there so narrow it down for a bit, do a bit of research of what people think of those particular ones and then get whichever you like best and you think will suit you the most. (regardless if clipless or platform). I second that it's probably a good idea to start with Shimano in regards to clipless, or something with adjustable tension, unless your knees really need the float.
    [SIZE="2"]Life's a bi&*h & then you Ride![/SIZE]

  12. #12
    College Boy
    Reputation: Timeless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeyMT
    I guess I can see the rear wheel control point. But I don't see that being an advantage for the type of riding I do. But the secure on the pedals I do not agree with. I never have isues with my feet sliping off, even in wet conditions.

    Im most worried about going over the bars with clipless, or falling over in a rock garden and working myself

    Well if you went clipless you would understand the part on secure. It is a noticable jump.

    As for the crashing part. After a short time it is 2nd nature. Since I have gone clipless I have yes had crashes that sent me over the bars and I go over them the same as if I was on platforms. You start unclipping like 2nd nature. Bailing to me is the same as if I was platforms so it does not change that part for me. If and when I do hit the ground it would be because of other factors not cause by the pedals. the last time I fell on my side with clipless was not because of the pedals but because the bike slid out from under me on a turn and I went down instating. Now I know after the hit the ground I was unclipped and I unclipped some where between when I felt the bike give and when I hit the ground.

    But your case is a prim example of why people do not go clipless. Their own fear is holding them back. It just takes a little time to get over it and relieze that it easier to ride and just as safe. Now it might take a bad crash before you get over and see that you can get out of the pedals just fine. I knew I had it down when i went superman style flying over my bars and hit the ground and rolled. my bike still back and the tree my bars clipped. I knew I had it down then and I never had any worry about not being able to unclipped since that day.

  13. #13
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,765
    One point that nobody has brought up in favor of clipless is to keep your feet from bouncing off the pedals. That`s a big one for me. I sarted a clipless trial last fall and the jurry is still out for me. I`m going to keep them for at least a year before I put my platforms back. Of course, if I`m convinced by that time, putting the platforms back on won`t be needed. One bad point for clipless that nobody mentioned is that it can be awful tough to keep your feet warm when it`s cold out. There are neoprene gizmos that I haven`t had any luck with and warmer (expensive) shoes but it was never an issue to wear hiking boots with my platforms. BTW, I bought CB Smarties for about $40 and have never had any trouble unclipping. They were hard to clip into for a few rides before they broke in. In my case, I bought them because of the float. I know that I get uncomfortable with my feet anchored in the same position, so I wanted to be a little "looser".
    Recalculating....

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    7
    I have clipless pedals on my new bike but I am still debating whether to get a clipless shoe. The shoes are kind of pricey and I am not sure if I will like them or not. Is there a good place that I can get that will accept returns of I don't like them? Most LBS will not accept returns and I am kind of worried about buying them online as I am not sure it will fit.

  15. #15
    1.21 Jigowatts!
    Reputation: brubakes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    236
    Another vote for moving to clipless pedals. I remember when I first made the change over from normal pedals and wow, what a difference. They take a bit of getting used to, but it really isn't bad. I highly recommend Speedplay Frogs. I've run them for years and love them.
    '07 Giant Anthem 2
    '07 Giant Yukon
    '95 Diamondback WCF Vertex

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbhermit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    One point that nobody has brought up in favor of clipless is to keep your feet from bouncing off the pedals. That`s a big one for me. I sarted a clipless trial last fall and the jurry is still out for me. I`m going to keep them for at least a year before I put my platforms back. Of course, if I`m convinced by that time, putting the platforms back on won`t be needed. One bad point for clipless that nobody mentioned is that it can be awful tough to keep your feet warm when it`s cold out. There are neoprene gizmos that I haven`t had any luck with and warmer (expensive) shoes but it was never an issue to wear hiking boots with my platforms. BTW, I bought CB Smarties for about $40 and have never had any trouble unclipping. They were hard to clip into for a few rides before they broke in. In my case, I bought them because of the float. I know that I get uncomfortable with my feet anchored in the same position, so I wanted to be a little "looser".
    Good points - something to add is that with platforms I no longer have my toes (or any other part of my feet) going numb either or getting pressure points!
    [SIZE="2"]Life's a bi&*h & then you Ride![/SIZE]

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gdl357's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    I'll personally never use clipless, because my type of riding does not warrant them nor would they be safe to use in such situations(I do mainly dirt jumps, street riding, light downhill, 4X racing and skatepark riding) so my recommendation will be for a flat pedal: Animal Hamilton Sealed, great pedal, lots of grip, concave, and you can pick any colour you want!

    Well, yes i am a noob on clippless, but I have been riding MTB for years.

    Yesterday, after giving my Shimano SPD PD-520 another go, I decided to pull them out as I was thinking about unclipping more than enjoying the ride. Clipless is just not for me. SO... I recommend the pedals I have just purchased... the Azonic A-Frame platform pedals. FU Clipless! You almost had my leg break on one occasion!

    These here --> http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...me+Pedals.aspx

    and the great reviews are here --> http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Pedal/product_50494.shtml

    Thx

  18. #18
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,765
    Quote Originally Posted by robertwee
    I have clipless pedals on my new bike but I am still debating whether to get a clipless shoe. The shoes are kind of pricey and I am not sure if I will like them or not. Is there a good place that I can get that will accept returns of I don't like them? Most LBS will not accept returns and I am kind of worried about buying them online as I am not sure it will fit.
    I`d sure hate to buy a pair of shoes- bike shoes or otherwise- that I hadn`t tried on. Those Powergrips that somebody else put up the link for might be your ticket. Might end up being my ticket too, at least for the winter. I`ve read a lot of good stuff about them and just about the only bad comments are that they`re ugly and they`re one-sided (you have to make sure you flip them right side up).
    Recalculating....

  19. #19
    One-Winged Angel
    Reputation: Sephiroth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    63
    Crap. I was planning on maybe buying a set of clipless pedals this weekend... but with all the conflicting opinions, I'm still not sure what to do.

    I like the idea of clipless for downhills with roots and rocks (so my feet don't get bounced off), but not so much for going over the handlebars or stalling on uphills. :/

  20. #20
    College Boy
    Reputation: Timeless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by Sephiroth
    Crap. I was planning on maybe buying a set of clipless pedals this weekend... but with all the conflicting opinions, I'm still not sure what to do.

    I like the idea of clipless for downhills with roots and rocks (so my feet don't get bounced off), but not so much for going over the handlebars or stalling on uphills. :/

    again it not going to be an issue on those. Once you get used to them the stalling part will no longer be an issue you will unclip just fine. Dummie falls (slow speed fall) go away fairly quickly and you get the hand of it.

    As for crashes that cause you to go over you bars you will unclip just fine. Clipping out because 2nd nature just like if you drive a manual car after a little time you do not even have to think about it. You just do it.

  21. #21
    MTBR Demi-God
    Reputation: anirban's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    832
    Quote Originally Posted by Squash
    be a good idea if you want to try them. But, DON'T go Egg Beaters, or Tyme pedals for your first set!!!! These pedals do not have adjustable release tension!!! This can be a problem for a beginner as the release tension on Beaters and Tymes is a bit stiff.

    Just a suggestion, but in my experience beginners do better on Shimano clipless pedals to start with. They are easier to use in the beginning. From there you can stick with em or try something different if you like.

    Good Dirt
    I would second Squash's suggestion on trying out with Shimano pedals, if you want to go clipless. I started out first with Shimano M324 pedals, and the adjustable release tension was a big help- and the platform side as well.

    Now I use Eggbeaters most of the time, and I can tell you that they are a bit stiffer to release than the "easy" setting on the Shimanos.
    "Winners never quit. Quitters never win. But those who never win and never quit are idiots."

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NoVA_JB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    180
    One last suggestion, you can always buy pedals that have a platform and when you turn them over they have the clipless option. I think they are called campus pedals and I saw them at performance bike.
    I'm not sure how well they work as clipless but you could start using them as platform and if you find a good deal on shoes you can give them a try.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sisco_28601's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    263
    Quote Originally Posted by mehorto
    [...] Does anyone have any suggestions for new pedals? Are they necessary, [...]
    Am I the only one who noticed this? Sorry, but some HAS to rag on you for asking that...

    My 2 cts; I've used clipless for a long time and I wouldn't do without them. I've always like the added power and control but it does take a few rides to get used to them. They're certainly not adequate for the extreme MTBers amongst us...

    Have fun!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4
    So I bought the new peds today ultimately choosing the Shimano 520s. I have a couple of things that I feel would be helpful to contribute to any nubes/potential buyers like myself.

    First point, Safety. Granted, you take a spill on clipless peds you could have an unfortunate mishap like our friend above where they wouldn't come unclipped. However, jumping on bikes with nothing holding you in place also has its drawbacks. For instance I had a mishap saturday which very nearly made me the last link on the family tree .

    Additionally, clipped peds have no release mechanism like the clippless peds which could definitely result in a tragedy as well.

    Second point, manufacturer. I've found that no matter what lbs or website I go to shimano always has a significant presence. Because of this I'm much more confortable knowing that I can get replacement parts quickly if they do happen to break.

    In regards to the float allowed on both the time and eggbeaters, the float is not only bigger allowing more movement but also unsupported. As a beginner I found that the shimano's allowed for enough float to be confortable and also spring assisted. The shoes also can be adjusted to where the foot will face naturally. Hopefully this allows less of a chance of me being thrown off balance. I'm sure this is a personal preference though and would depend on style.

    Final point, interchangability. Pedals have to be the easiest thing on a bike to remove. Take into account what your days riding conditions will be like and put your platforms back on.

    hope this helps
    Last edited by mehorto; 05-25-2007 at 03:41 AM.

  25. #25
    Coyotewoman
    Reputation: mtrh8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    184
    Quote Originally Posted by NoVA_JB
    One last suggestion, you can always buy pedals that have a platform and when you turn them over they have the clipless option. I think they are called campus pedals and I saw them at performance bike.
    I'm not sure how well they work as clipless but you could start using them as platform and if you find a good deal on shoes you can give them a try.
    I have used the clipless on one side,plateform on the other now for several years on my XC bike.Shimano makes a pair.About 50 bucks.I like that I can clip in to do things I am comfortable on and unclip if I have my doubts or just want to ride without my bike shoes.As my confidence has grown I use them more and more.I think that for me the option helped build my confidence up.People told me I would not like them because your not always on the "right" side, but I do and don't really find it a issue.Maybe if I was a racer.I am just now beginning to intertain the idea of clipless only on my bike but really only because I am a weight -wennie and they are a heavy pedal.Otherwise I think I'd keep these,no reason not to.BTW I have always had mine set as loose as possiable.I have never fallen over and never come unclipped when I was not trying.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •