1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Parts Warranty?

  1. #1
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    Parts Warranty?

    I was riding downhill today and my front rim snapped like a twig and caused me to go over the handlebars. I bought my bike last June/July and there is supposed to be a 1 year warranty on all the parts. I wasn't doing anything the bike wasn't supposed to be able to handle (i.e. freeriding a cross country bike). I was simply snaking my way down, at a low speed, a 40 - 50 foot hill. Apparently, the rim failure is not covered under warranty. Is this normal? I mean, I ride the bike hard, and I weigh 200 pounds, but I've only had the thing for 10-11 months. Why wouldn't the rim be warrantied?

    edit: bike is approved for cross country/"all mountain", rim is Sun Black Eye

  2. #2
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    Most if not all rims are not covered by warranties as you can never prove you were just riding along. If it was a hub though, you might've been luckier.

  3. #3
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    Damn, hopefully the Rhyno Lite lasts longer.

  4. #4
    Are you talking to me?
    Reputation: damion's Avatar
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    What Rhino Lite?

    Is it mailorder, or from the shop?

    If mailorder, have it tensioned and trued, by a wheel mechanic that knows what your weight is. If you are buying from the shop, ask the lead mechanic to check the wheel, and mention your weight.

    You (and all of us 200+) really need to keep an eye on our wheels. Check them every once in awhile for loose spokes, staying round, and close to true.

    Your wheel did not decide to taco all of a sudden. If you did not do something huge to it, it had loose spokes and/or was out of true when it failed.

    One thing you can do is try to hit bumps/roots/rocks as straigt on as possible to minimize the side angle impacts on the wheel. Dont go out of yor way to do this, but if you have a choice, go straigt on.

    I am 230 with gear, and a fanatical about the wheels. If I start popping spokes, I replace all the spokes, and the rim, because I know it is just a matter of time.
    gfy

  5. #5
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    I'm getting the Rhyno Lite from the shop. Both my rear and old front rim are/were out of true. Every full rotation of the tire caused the brake disc to rub slightly against my brake pads. I didn't think it was that big a deal. I thought it was just a bit of a performance issue rather than a safety issue. I didn't realize loose spokes/out of true wheels could help a rim taco. Come to think of it, I remember being aware of the fact that my front wheel was making some odd noises at the start of my ride yesterday. I remember thinking, ahhhh, it's probably just a bit out of true. I didn't think much of it at the time.

    Now I'm well aware of why they tell you to check your bike after every ride, and make sure it's in top condition.

  6. #6
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    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
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    brakes 101...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThisIsMyName
    Every full rotation of the tire caused the brake disc to rub slightly against my brake pads. I didn't think it was that big a deal. I thought it was just a bit of a performance issue rather than a safety issue.
    Even with trued wheels, the brake discs may need their own truing. Zip over to the brake forum and read up how to do that in the upper right corner - DISC Brake FAQ.

    Jim

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