1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
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    Parkpre 925 frame

    I'm new to the mtb scene and have this old Parkpre 925 frame thats been in my garage for years and I'd like to put together. My question is, are parts to get this running easy to come by and how much do you think it will take to get it going.
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  2. #2
    not your average bear
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    Personally, I wouldnt bother. I dont work for a bike shop, but a new hardtail for someone getting back in can be had for 5 to 8 hundred.
    The frame doesnt look in great shape and the fork is super dated.
    Youll enjoy yourself much better with a bike that doesnt need tons on work.

  3. #3
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    Well I heard this frame is a good frame and I really don't want to just toss it, isn't it a good frame to start with for a beginner or will it be a money pit.

  4. #4
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    Plus I'd be looking for used parts to put it back together..

  5. #5
    not your average bear
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    If you're really set on this frame, find out the bottom bracket width, seat tube inside and outside diameter, rear dropout inside space (probably 135mm) and get busy. Most parts should fit, you'll probably need rim brakes in lieu of discs. Other than that stick with 7 or 8 speed drive train. Good luck

  6. #6
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    Well I'm not stuck on the frame but is it worth putting it together or should I throw it in the trash and start looking for a bike.

  7. #7
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    Whats your budget?

  8. #8
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    Well I would be looking for used parts so under $400?

    Mind you I'm totally new to this so try not to laugh if that sounds rediculous.

  9. #9
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    I say go for it. You should just build yourself one from the frame that you have. The reasons why is:

    1. You put time in it! The more time you put in it, the more you will love riding it.
    2. It should be alot cheaper. Frame is usually the most expensive.
    3. You'll learn how to work your bike! Meaning no money spent on LBS.

  10. #10
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Put it this way...that quality of frame today would cost you four or five hundred dollars... easy... if not more. Check out the vintage bikes forum, heck if they saw you post it in there there'd be lots going "its worthless, give it to me" as they'd want it for their own projects.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  11. #11
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    Thanks for that input, the parts searching will now begin.

  12. #12
    Compulsive Bike Builder
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    Agree with Dee

    The ParkPre 925 is a great frame. I have a friend who still rides one. His is covered in purple ano parts that were all the rage at the time, much like your water bottle cage. I still have a ParkPre Hammer that will probably go forever. I gave it to my son when he is in grade school, he is now in college.

    ParkPre made great frames but is no longer in business. There is a www.parkpre.com website maintained by owners, though. I am sure they can help you build or sell the frame.

    ParkPre has also been reincarnated as a pretty different new company that bears the same name, see www.parkpreusa.com
    Disclaimer: ComCycle USA

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad
    The ParkPre 925 is a great frame. I have a friend who still rides one. His is covered in purple ano parts that were all the rage at the time, much like your water bottle cage. I still have a ParkPre Hammer that will probably go forever. I gave it to my son when he is in grade school, he is now in college.

    ParkPre made great frames but is no longer in business. There is a www.parkpre.com website maintained by owners, though. I am sure they can help you build or sell the frame.

    ParkPre has also been reincarnated as a pretty different new company that bears the same name, see www.parkpreusa.com
    Hey thanks, very informative!

  14. #14
    pronounced may-duh
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    I think you have a great frame that is worth the effort to build up. 400.00 is not a huge budget for parts but with smart shopping you coulkd end up with a very cool bike.

    However your fork is very old and a new fork could cost 400.00. Also almost all the current forks have 1-1/8" steerer tubes. I suspect your frame may have the older and smaller 1" sized set up. So if you can live with that fork then I think your good to go.

    I suggest you post on the retro forum. Those guys are all about these kind of projects.

  15. #15
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    Is that the only fork that is availible for this bike?


    I think its 1 1/8 so i'm good.
    Last edited by Hanzo Steel; 04-24-2007 at 11:19 AM.

  16. #16
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    Its a 21" frame, what size rims should I be looking for?



    Being a newbie sucks...

  17. #17
    pronounced may-duh
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    Almost all the current forks available are 1-1/8" I would not go with more than 80mm of travel.

    you need 26" wheels. thats the standard size for mtn bikes. If you don't know that you probably don't know a lot of simple yet important info required to build a bike. Perhaps you should work with your LBS or a friend who knows what thier doing.

    No offense but your asking some ultra newbie questions.

  18. #18
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    Yeah I pretty much just got off the boat.

  19. #19
    pronounced may-duh
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    Experience is often attained after you needed it the most. Good Luck !

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