1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Opinions: Trek Fuel EX6 vs. Cannondale RZ One Twenty 4

    In the market for a new FS mountain bike, mostly XC, single-track, rooty trails. Around $1500 to spend. Looking at all options... only a couple at local stores in my price range:

    Trek Fuel EX6 - http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...el_ex/fuelex6/

    Cannondale RZ One Twenty 4 - http://www.rei.com/product/798506

    I've test-ridden the EX6 and it feels nice, but compared to my current "Walmart" bike everything does. Also ran across the Cannondale RZ One Twenty 4 at REI. I haven't seen any real reviews on the C-Dale One Twenty 4... seems like there's multiple reviews of everything else out there so wondering if that's a warning sign for some reason.

    At any rate, just wondering if anyone has opinions of either/both bikes, or advice based on the specs. Any suggestions are appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Whats up dude. Looking at the specs they both look equally good. Looking at the suspension I believe the Cannondale is a single pivot design while the trek is a dual pivot design. Also the Trek has a fox rp2 shock which is a great shock. Im not sure if the fork on the cannondale is coil driven while the fork on the Trek is air driven which is good..

    Now im already kinda biased towards the Trek because I own a 2010 Fuel EX9 and I love it so Im gonna tell you to go for the Trek cause I already know its a great bike. I think the Trek would be a better buy. If I was you Id go to professional Bike shops that can put in the recommended suspension sag on the bike for your weight that way you can get a better feel for it. You can probably rent any of these models to ride out and make up your mind. Good luck bud.
    Only type of shuttle I ride....the ambulance!

  3. #3
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    I'd go with the Trek. Two reasons:

    Better suspension design. The ABP/floater design stays active during braking while the single pivot design of the RZ stffens up. Essentially the bike bounces when you need it to be plush during panic breaking in rough sections.

    A friend of mine owns a Trek EX and tries to destry it since more than two years. He is a really good and very aggressive rider. Think 5 foot drops, gap jumps, fast descends on rough trails... besides killer climbs and long distance rides. So far the Trek is holding up great. He thought he'd use Trek's lifetime warranty. Nope. Not so far.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaba Klaus
    . Essentially the bike bounces when you need it to be plush during panic breaking in rough sections.
    on paper, sure.. on the trail most people dont notice. brake squat is hugely blown out of proportion. treks abp isnt a ton more than marketing. not saying it doesnt work, but its not the solution to some horrible problem that plagues bikes without it.

    ride them both, buy the one you like. try a giant trance x3 too, might be able to get one around 1500.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    on paper, sure.. on the trail most people dont notice. brake squat is hugely blown out of proportion. treks abp isnt a ton more than marketing. not saying it doesnt work, but its not the solution to some horrible problem that plagues bikes without it.

    ride them both, buy the one you like. try a giant trance x3 too, might be able to get one around 1500.



    Bike squat while braking usually happens when you use the brakes but your posture is not in a attack stance to counter attack the forces that braking does to your body. For instance if your going fast and you slam on the brake and youu let those forces control your body you feel like your upperbody is being soaked into the suspension and thus over your bars. This will happen on any suspesion bike from $100.00 to $5000.00. When braking shift your weight lower towards your bike while slightley shifting your body back so that your body weight is not making your front suspension dip. I have no problems with bike squating. Theres a difference in braking just to stop and braking with proper posture to ensure that both the rear and front suspension are equally compressed at the same time making it easier and quicker to gain momentum again. Its like going full speed into a corner. If you brake in the corner your bike tends to wonder off the line you chose and part of it is that your body shifts towars the corner and sinks your front suspension. Some people do this on purpose thinking that its helping the front end dig into the curve but it actually diminishes traction and increases chances of washout. If you have to brake brake before the curveso your suspension front and back equally digs into the curve and your body is in a attack stance (and thats if you even need to brake before the curve. Theres more to braking then just pushing the levers.

    I agree with the Giant Trance optionn. They are good bikes.
    Only type of shuttle I ride....the ambulance!

  6. #6
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    OP

    I was in a similar position a while back. I ended up choosing the Cannodale. It suited my riding style better. Does not mean it is the better bike which is why you have to ride all the bikes and decide. Do not leave out Giant like others have said. They are very good bikes.

    Good Luck

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, the EX6 they had at 19" wasn't a good fit for me (5'9", 32" inseam). I couldn't quite clear the top tube, and I can see that being a... problem.

    I went to REI to see if they had that Cannondale, but a couple of LBS's have locked up rights to C-dale in the area, and those didn't have anything I liked in my range.

    Had almost decided to go with an Avalanche 2.0 at $575... I really liked the feel. Figured I could sell it for $200+ next year, and not have broken the bank if I really wanted a FS. But it was somewhat heavy (35-ish?), and I likely would have eventually splurged another $200-300 on a fork upgrade, maybe hydraulic brakes.... which would have blown my "deal".

    Then I ran across a '10 Stumpjumper FS Comp for $1,500 at a LBS. Seems well reviewed, a decent teal, and a good frame worth upgrading over time. It's mostly rooty singletrack trails around here, and I heard a FS is better on your back when taking a pounding vs. a hardtail (not getting any younger at 38), so leaning back toward the FS.

    1) Any opinions of the Stumpjumper? Not sure about the coil shocks... I had seriously been looking at the Moto Fantom DS Pro with the Reba Race/motion control, but worried about potential bad fit of the Moto sans being able to test it... and I could probably justify a better fork if I don't like the Stumpy's Tora SLite after a year or so. Anything is better than the beast I'm riding now.

    2) Any "limitations" on upgrade paths with this bike? I've read posts that say "you can't use that with those"....

    Looking to pull the trigger tomorrow. The '10's on sale seem to be going fast and I don't want to have this sold from under me... there's only one 18" in stock that I can find locally.

    Thanks in advance for any opinions!

  8. #8
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    Don't worry about the stand over height too much. The reach from the seat to the handlebars is the most important. The only time when you have to worry about stand over is when you are not riding the bike, only standing over it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Don't worry about the stand over height too much. The reach from the seat to the handlebars is the most important. The only time when you have to worry about stand over is when you are not riding the bike, only standing over it.
    Really? I can see me taking my foot off the pedal avoiding some wipeout and experiencing some.... err... unpleasantness dropping onto the top tube. I had almost negative clearance against my berries.

  10. #10
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    If you have to take your foot off the pedal, then you lean the bike to one side. Quite a few people worry about having standover clearance, but unless the bike fits properly when you are riding - having the correct reach - then stand over is absolutely worthless.

  11. #11
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    The Stumpjumper is a good bike! It should serve you well for many years.

    1) Coil spring in the fork is a good thing. I probably get flames on this... but: Coil offers a more linear feel and is simpler to setup (no air pressure to worry about). In case you find you need a different spring - they are cheap.

    2) No issues with upgrades. The bike is pretty much standard parts only. - I don't think you'll need any upgrades any time soon!

    I own a Specialized (Demo), friends own some (Stumpy, Pitch, Enduro) and we are all happy with quality and the ride (cannot speak to service... didn't need that, yet).
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  12. #12
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    That's a great deal for that Sumpjumper. My buddy has one and loves it, he rides it really hard and it's holding up great.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaba Klaus
    The Stumpjumper is a good bike! It should serve you well for many years.

    1) Coil spring in the fork is a good thing. I probably get flames on this... but: Coil offers a more linear feel and is simpler to setup (no air pressure to worry about). In case you find you need a different spring - they are cheap.

    2) No issues with upgrades. The bike is pretty much standard parts only. - I don't think you'll need any upgrades any time soon!

    I own a Specialized (Demo), friends own some (Stumpy, Pitch, Enduro) and we are all happy with quality and the ride (cannot speak to service... didn't need that, yet).
    A coil shock is simpler to set up IF you have the right coil spring on the shock. If not, you're looking at buying and trying different coils and geting the preload right on each one.

    Once you get the coil right, it's more set it and forget it than an air shock.

    But, with an air shock, you can be fairly certain that you can get it set up right without buying additional springs. Just pump it so the sag is in the range you'd like to try and ride. Don't quiye like it? Change it a little one way or another and knock yourself out. Riding a different style of terrain? Change the sag to suit your riding conditions.

    Some prefer they 'quality' of travel the coil springs offer. Some prefer the versatility of an air shock. Name your poison, ride the piss out of it.
    =============================================
    The single pivots I have ridden did stiffen up when braking and tended to bounce around more when descending rocky/rough terrain with the brakes on. I ride a Giant Reign these days and it's Maestro suspension design is noticeably better than the single pivots I have ridden in this regard.
    =============================================
    To the OP, I know you're excited to get a bike, but you're all over the place here and if I could offer one piece of advice to you right now it would be: Slow down tiger. You are all over the place here with regard to what you think you want and what you're willing to accept.

    I would advise you to take some time and ride as many different bikes as possible. If you're just geting into the sport, maybe an entry level hardtail would be a good way to begin. With a modest investment, you will get the experience you need to be able to discern what your ultimate bike should be. I like to tell new riders that they shouldn't try to find their ultimate bike on the forst try because they are much more likely to get it wrong. Get some experience under your belt, start saving your money and the right choice will reveal itself to you without nearly as much hand-wringing.

    If you're concerned about the banging arounf being hard on your back, you could consider a 29er hardtail. They are not as hard on you as a similar 26" wheeled hardtail and can still be had for a modest price as an entry level bike.

    There are lots of excellent choices out there. In addition to checking out the Specialized bikes, I agree about trying out a Giant TranceX or Anthem if you want a full suspension bike.

    As for the mail order option, from what I reading about you, I see that being a risky way for someone like you to buy a bike. If you were more certain about what you want, knew the difference in componentry and suspension designs, and are failry good at wrenching on your bike so you can make sure to get it set up right after it was delivered to you it might be a better, less risky option (as far as getting the right bike for you).

    If you do shop around and decide that you really do like that Trek, but need a different size, you could look around to see if someone else has the size you require.

    Good luck with your search.

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