1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Nutritional Information?

    Hi - new member here. I've had my MB for about 3 years now but am just starting to consider getting serious about it. I'm 36 years old, I work a desk job and the reality of my physical fitness (or lack thereof) is really starting to hit me. I love riding but have never had the stamina for it so I'm working on that by doing some indoor training this winter; mainly cardio on the bike on a trainer, pushups, situps and pullups for some basic strength training.

    My question is this - where can I get some good nutritional information? I search the Beginner's forum but couldn't really find anything. May also sound like a silly question but I have a wicked metabolism and have been able to eat what I want and drink all the beer I want for a decade and never break 150lbs at 6 feet tall. But I realize that most of the time I eat s**t and it's not going to help me become a healthier person and ultimately a better rider.

    Books you would recommend - or should I shell out the money to meet with a nutritionist?

    Thanks for any recommendations. Look forward to getting more involved here and learning as I start to ride more.

  2. #2
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    Not quite sure how to help othe than sayi g it a balance diet.

    Cut out all fast food and processed food if possible. Cut back on your red meat consumption. Hard for me to do in the winter time but cut out most carbs unless you plan on riding the next day. A protein and salad do well for me to lose a bit of weight. Cut out as much sugar as possible. That includeds all soft drinks, even the diet ****.
    Dare I say beer? That's one of my vices for sure.

    It takes some commitment and making smart choices. I fail all the time but just keep at it. Fruits, veggies, grains like rice or quinoa, and smaller portions if meat.

    I'm not a nutrionist but I'm willing to bet if you cut out the sugar(use a little bit if honey instead),the fast food, and processed foods you will feel a difference. I am sure there is a plethora of info on the Internet. Just be wary of diet sites
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  3. #3
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    Nutritional Information?

    There is a metric **** ton of advice ranging from sound to complete garbage.

    Start simple and make slow, progressive changes. Changing everything wholesale at the same time is a recipe for failure.

    Leave room for some pleasurable food, too, without feeling like you are cheating.

    You need protein, carbs, and fats. The types of sources where you obtain them matters.

    Organic grass fed beef is not the same as a big mac, for example, so don't treat them the same in your diet. Believe it or not, organic animal products are healthier than their factory-raised counterparts. Their nutritional profiles are different, whereas the issue with organic produce tends to be with residual pesticides and herbicides on the "conventionally-grown" produce but the nutritional profiles don't really differ.

    Processed foods in general play havoc on your body so buy the least processed foods you can. Many processed foods contain too much salt and preservatives and also make excessive use of surplus corn and soy. Stay away from diet and low fat everything. All they do is substitute one thing for another. Diet stuff uses artificial sweeteners that screw around with your metabolism and low fat stuff substitutes sugar for fat. You are better off with the fat.

    Learn to cook and prepare whole foods (vegetables and meats and beans and grains) so they taste as good or better than the processed crap you may be used to. This time of year I make tons of soups and stews. My wife and I cook a couple days a week and have leftovers all week long. We get our fruits and vegetables delivered weekly which helps with time spent at the grocery store.

  4. #4
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    This day and age all the info is right in front of you, honestly IMO there is no need to meet with a nutritionist. You said you started working out, what is your goal? To gain more stamina for riding, to bulk up, get toned or just be in overall better shape? At 150 6ft you don't need to cut weight so what your intake is for what you are trying to achieve is going to be key. Search for a macronutrient calculator, that will give you a good idea of how many calories, carbs, protein and fats you should be getting. Assuming you have a smartphone, download myfitnesspal app, it's a easy way to record everything you are taking in. Use is for a few weeks and you'll get a idea of what you can eat and when. And yes, eating healthy makes a HUGE difference.

    Depending on what your goal is with working out, there are plenty of sites you can search that will give you a great workout plan.

  5. #5
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    If you're counting calories, getting a Garmin 510 with HR and speed/cadence sensor and setting up your current height/weight, you'll get a pretty accurate count of calories burned while riding.

  6. #6
    Rod
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    Nate is right on target. Cut out all the processed junk (a lot easier than it sounds), eat a lot of lean protein, fruits, and veggies.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  7. #7
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    Re: Nutritional Information?

    Lots of good advice in this thread. I'll add a tidbit that has helped me clean up my diet - plan ahead! If you plan out your meals and snacks ahead of time, convenience foods will be far less tempting for you.

    Like someone already mentioned, it's really not all that hard to live healthier, it's just a matter of changing habits

  8. #8
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    Nutritional Information?

    I'll second the MyFitnessPal app suggestion. Makes it easy to keep a food journal which is a great way to really get into the mindset of "watch what you eat". Helps you figure out how you're doing on the proper balance of carbs, proteins and fats.

    May not tell you what to eat, but it definitely can impact your mindset about good nutrition habits.

  9. #9
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    +3 on the MyFitnessPal app. They also have a web site if you don't have a smartphone, and the two will sync if you use both. Even if you're not dieting to lose weight, you can use it to track things like macronutrients. If you do use it, don't guess on serving sizes, measure everything, at least at first. You'll be surprised to learn that a serving size isn't what you think it is.

    Also agree with small changes at a time. If you try to go hardcore organic-paleo-keto-vegan-whatever diet straight away, you're just setting yourself up for failure. Do you cook? Just preparing meals from fresh ingredients and getting your carb/protein/fat ratio right will get you 90% there.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  10. #10
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    I find my system is pretty balanced and healthy. At least I can't find any detrimental qualities in it so it must be good right.

    Carbs:
    1 gram per bodyweight pound (optimal bodyweight. Heavier folks can't eat more)
    Where carbs come from matters. Pure sugar is mostly unnecessary. White bread, white pasta, white rice and all other sources which are very high in pure carb should be avoided when possible. Or not. But eating a lot of pure carb means you get to eat less so I prefer full grain breads, pasta etc. Veggies and fruits are good sources for carbs and contain fiber, vitamins, etc.

    Protein:
    0.8 grams per two bodyweight pounds (again ideal bodyweight)
    Protein can be had from veggies meat and dairy. Beans and nuts are good. Red meat is not as healthy as chicken. Cheese is awesome but usually high in calories due to fat content. I try to limit my meat consumption so I don't eat like a friggin carnivore. Then again meat is pretty good so...

    Fat:
    Enough. I don't as such limit it, but nor do I think I need more of it due to some obscure reason. A few tablespoons in salad, occasional fry with butter, put some oil on the potatos in the oven. Meat and dairy have fat and I don't avoid those. According to current knowledge good oils and nuts are the best sources for fat as they contain non saturated fats. Meat is contains saturated fat which is worse. But don't go all hysteric on the saturated/unsaturated. Moderation is key.

    Veggies:
    Lots. Try to eat as much as you can. Different kinds. Tomatoes, salad, avocado, nuts, berries, you name it. Veggies have a lot of good stuff in them with a relatively low calorie count (apart from nuts though).

    The most important point I feel is to moderately eat a bit of everything. Don't eat just tofu for protein, or oranges for carbs. A bit of everything should give a good amount of all the required micronutrients and macronutrients required.

    More about the carbs. A sedentary person does not need much. But an athlete need considerably more since carbs are the main fuel when doing something straining. Carbs are stored as glycogen and that is used then as energy. So before a long ride those glycogen stores should be filled. That means eating more carbs a day or two before the long ride. If you ride long rides every day you should eat more carbs every day. How much? Hard to say, but pro's can eat even 800 grams of carbs a day. That's almost two pounds of bread. Per day. Wow.

    So a bit before a ride. Some during a ride (the human body can absorb 60-70 grams per hour so don't exceed that) and most importantly. Lots right after the ride! Carbs are one of the most important component of effective recovery. The body will get energy to the muscles after a workout and it does not care where the energy comes from. It can get them through food (chocolate milk is found to be better than actual recovery drinks) or from dismantling the body's own structures (aka muscles). So a glass of chocolate milk right after you get inside and a meal a bit afterwards.

    And learn to cook. Processed is bad. It always has too much salt or sugar or both and usually processed foods are somehow skewed towards unhealthy. They try to make stuff on the cheap (put bad oils or meats or sugars in).
    When you cook yourself you can go for quality so that everything you use is healthy.

  11. #11
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8iking VIIking View Post
    Lots of good advice in this thread. I'll add a tidbit that has helped me clean up my diet - plan ahead! If you plan out your meals and snacks ahead of time, convenience foods will be far less tempting for you.

    Like someone already mentioned, it's really not all that hard to live healthier, it's just a matter of changing habits
    Great advice. You gotta plan your meals, buy the ingredients to make those meals, and make small adjustments until you get to where you want to be.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  12. #12
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    Excellent book with no fringe BS: Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes. Ryan.

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