1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    number dot number naming

    Hi,

    I'm on the market for a new MTB, and I see a lot of models with names having a number.number format, like xxxxx 7.0 or yyyyy 6.9

    Do these numbers mean anything?

  2. #2
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    Do you have an example or two you can show?
    2012 Specialized Carve Comp 29
    IMBA Member
    Team J3 :: http://www.ridej3.com

  3. #3
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    Canyon Testsieger-Bikes direkt vom Hersteller | Canyon Direktvertrieb (press shop, select a model, see the submodels. Example: the Nerve AL 29)
    Rockrider VTT VTT CROSS COUNTRY - Les vélos - Vélos, Cyclisme - Decathlon

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Yeah. Trek sells a lot of bikes by frame and spec level. I think the first number is usually the frame and the second is usually the component spec. Higher is better.

    To keep things from making sense, a lot of companies assign lower numbers to their fancier-spec'ed bikes. So you still need to glance at the SRP or the fork or shifters or something.

    At least numbers are sequential, though. Specialized's naming scheme is consistent from bike to bike, but not necessarily intuitive.

    And both companies are morons about name recognition. Trek has a series of numbered mountain bikes that are roughly parallel to the named mountain bikes they used to sell with a Gary Fisher badge. Specialized has made the venerable Rockhopper into a low-end bike, added the "Carve" and renamed it the "Crave." And the Stumpjumper can be a XC race bike or a all-mountain bike, depending on whether you get the hardtail or full-suspension version. Dumb.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    I think for Canyon you should carefully evaluate the specs based on the price not number. Some of their low number models are very adequately spec'ed making the sizeable price increase to the higher number model poor value, imo. I'd go low and get an upgrade component or two at a good price from one of the German online parts sellers.

  6. #6
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    Often the number before the dot is the "level" of the bike (higher numbers = better components), and the lower number is the model year. E.g. 8.1 would be from 2011 with better components than 6.1. See the website of the German manufacturer Bergamont for example.

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