1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Noob mistake - always carry a tire patch up kit

    Well, I got my ass handed to me on the trail today. I always knew I was on borrowed time, but always made an excuse on, "Hey, I'll get a spare tire and a patch up kit soon. Not today."

    Well was coasting along, went over some rocks and boom, tire went out. Had no spare or nothing to patch it up with and had to haul it about a half mile to the road. I then hid it and ran/walked another mile and a half to my truck. Came back, picked it up and headed straight to the LBS.

    Yeah, got a spare and patch up kit in my hydration bladder now. It's amazing how a 2-mile walk will wake you up that you are a complete dumbass.

  2. #2
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    I hear ya... to be honest though, I've been mtn biking off and on for nearly 20 years (mostly "off" the last 10 years), and I've yet to have a flat! I usually run Slime or Goo or something in my tires and I've never gotten bit.

    But like you, I'm probably on 'borrowed time.' LOL

  3. #3
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    Tubeless is your friend.

  4. #4
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    I was actually prepared with an extra tube and a patch kit but today it didn't matter. 7 miles from the trailhead I got a real bad pinch flat that I couldn't patch so I used my spare tube. On my way back about 2 miles from my truck I got a flat from a cactus that no matter how hard I tried I couldn't get the tube to hold air. I had to walk back and of course passed other MTBers to include a couple cute bike bunnies. I am definitely changing over to tubeless now.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  5. #5
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    Moral of the story is even if your prepared Murphy will still find a way.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  6. #6
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    Damn, and I thought I had it bad.

  7. #7
    Dirt Abuser
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    Carry a spare tube in your camelbak/hydration unit if you carry one. Co2 is lighter than a mini pump, but you'll need to carry one or the other. I also carry a patch kit, they have them without the need for the cement now...
    "Don't ride faster than your guardian angel can fly"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxnroots View Post
    Tubeless is your friend.

  9. #9
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxnroots View Post
    Tubeless is your friend.
    Tubeless are not immune to flats.
    EVERYBODY should carry a spare tube.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    Tubeless are not immune to flats.
    EVERYBODY should carry a spare tube.
    I agree - this is absolutely true if you want to guard 100% against the relatively remote possibility of a tubeless flat - but for those people like the OP who are going to skip carrying extra tubes, patch kits, pumps/canisters, levers, etc. anyway this would represent a great reduction in the threat of hike-a-bike. There are plenty of people who look at those odds and are willing to take that particular gamble with tubeless to save weight on the ride.

    FWIW I ride a lot of Northeast old farmfield singletrack with endless amounts of autumn olive, multiflora rosa plus random pieces of old barbed wire fencing and broken beer bottles. Probably some of the worst stuff around, excluding goatheads/cacti spines out West. Used to flat constantly with tubes but not once since in the year since I converted even with thorns sticking out all over by the time I get back to the trailhead.

  11. #11
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    n00bness

    n00b question:

    What is the process for dealing with a tubeless flat on the trail?

    It sounds like a somewhat messy/tricky process.

    Also, while we're on the subject... where can I find a thread with advice on what I should always have with me on the trail?

    Thanks!

  12. #12
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    Master...here ya go...

    Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    Right now I am waiting on my osprey raptor to arrive so I am just riding the desert trails around my house. To start, I have a spare tube, tire patch kit (which should come with instructions for you), small mini tool kit, mini pump and of course water. I will also take with me some snacks and my cell phone.

  13. #13
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    yeah, patch kit, chain break, advil, knife, frame pump, etc... need it all. i just put everything in my seat bag, its out of the way, and there's still room for my cellphone. i don't carry tubes with me, just patches. i keep the tubes in the car, unless we're doing more than 10 miles or so out, then i bring the backpack with the bladder. i just don't like to carry **** with me if i don't have to. you could always throw leaves and grass in your tire. move the good tube to the back, and throw the grass in the front. it'll at least keep you moving.

  14. #14
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    hey ou2mame, you only take the bladder out for 10+ miles rides? How many water bottles do you carry for less than that?

  15. #15
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    i have 2 bottle cages on my bike, and they fit bottles the size of the big gatorade bottles, about 64oz between the two of them. that's usually more than enough water for me. but if i'm going for a longer ride than that, deeper into the woods then i bring more. the trail where i do about 10-15 miles is surrounded by roads on the outskirts, so if i were to get hurt or something were to happen there's a few quick routes you can go to get help. but some other trails go off into the middle of nowhere so i try to be more prepared. i'm from florida originally, so my biggest concern is water haha

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