1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: madsedan's Avatar
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    Noob installs new fork, success!

    I took it all apart, used the hack saw and tape method and trimmed up with a dremel to match the stock stem length, cleaned, reassembled, and VOILA!
    Easier than I thought it would be, even adjusted my front brake to eliminate a rub.
    I will get the air pressure adjusted based on the chart and adjust the sag, and then I'm good to go.
    My new bar came in the mail today so I need to get down to my LBS for a new stem and some nicer grips to throw that all together and I'll install it soon.
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  2. #2
    WI. Big Boy MTBer
    Reputation: fattybikejones's Avatar
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    As a former wrench, there is nothing as satisfying as conquering a repair for the first time!
    Congrats!
    TREK X CALIBER 6, MOTOBECANE USA MIRAGE SLX

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mitzikatzi's Avatar
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    Any problems setting the "fork crown race"?
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  4. #4
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
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    dude, in the photo the fork is back to front!
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: madsedan's Avatar
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    I had no issues at all, I used a small flat screw driver between the race and the head and popped it right off and slid it on the new stem, then put a large pair of pliers open over the top of it and gently tapped it down with the handle of a screw driver. The hardest part of the whole thing was cutting an inch off the stem, it came 8" and I needed about 7 1/8" of length.
    The star nut was already installed on the new fork but was up in the portion I had to cut so I just popped it through the 7/8" of tube I cut and then reinstalled it all by threading the screw in a bit and tapping it with a small hammer.
    Maybe I'm missing something and it'll all fall apart but this was allot easier than I thought it was going to be. Could be because the bike was fairly new and the fork was as well that everything just came apart and went back together so easily.
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  6. #6
    Bike Addiction
    Reputation: 00sable's Avatar
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    I used a cheap pocket to get the crown race moving. Just tapped it with a hammer from the side till it slipped under and worked my way around. All down hill from there. Sounds like you did good.
    Disclaimer: Always get a second opinion cause I'm just guessing

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