1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #101
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    I have gone back to re-read this post many times over the last few weeks while researching a new bike: great info here. The discussion/format on derailleur and forks is fantastic. Can you talk about cassettes/chains, BB/cranksets, and hubs/rims?

  2. #102
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    When it comes to cassettes, chains, BB/crank sets, hubs and rims, it comes down to weight.

    Some cassettes will shift better than others, some chains will shift better than others and some chain, cassette, crank set combos will shift better than others - but not noticeably so for most people.

    Bottom brackets and hubs are, for the most part, a shell with some bearings and a spindle of some sort. Not much to them. Ceramic bearings are lighter, smoother and last longer than steel bearings. Some are sealed, while others are not. Sealed requires less maintenance.

    Some wheels have straight pull spokes meaning the spokes don't cross each other. They are sometimes lighter and certainly look cooler Some argue they aren't as strong. Same for rims. Lighter sometimes means more fragile - however, many lightweight wheels with straight pull spokes are stronger than some heavier, standard laced, wheels.

    When you get into crank sets, there are options for how many chain rings you want. Three gives wide gearing with a lot of duplicate gear ratios. That's why they came out with 2x chain rings. Again, many people don't use all the gear combos and you get, for the most part, the same gear range.

    Many parts of the world are flatter than others and a lot of people have chosen to go with a 1x crank set because that's all they want. It saves about a pound in weight. One way to do it is to just remove the inner and outer rings (if possible), along with the front derailleur, and shifter. You'll need a clutch rear derailleur to help control chain drop. Another method is a Wolf Tooth ring and/or a BBG Bashwich. This set up reduces your gear range significantly compared to the 2 and 3x set ups. You'll have to decide for yourself it it will work for your fitness and terrain.

    Another option is SRAM's XX1 solution. This gives, for the most part, full range compared to traditional 3x gearing. This requires an entire drivetrain and even a new rear hub to accommodate the 11 speed cassette.

    It's all in the name of simplicity and weight savings.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  3. #103
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    Hey Noobs posting "What Bike?" Read this!
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  4. #104
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    Anyone got anything to add?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  5. #105
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    Hey noobs - read this
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  6. #106
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    Great thread. Appreciate the contributions made here.

  7. #107
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    thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Hey noobs - read this
    Thanks for bumping up the thread (and starting it )...very informative !

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