1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    newbie question "terms"/riding type

    i have noticed alot of abbreviations on here i found or figured out what alot mean but is there a site dedicated to decifering all these terms.

    my other question is what kind of riding would this be: i want to ride alot of single track, around my town to get to where i need to go, do a few small drops and jumps if the jumps get real big i have my hoffman i can ride just small stuff i may come across on trail, and ride the on road trail to get to the off road trail.

    what kind of bike would i need to do all that stuff? do they make them? i am looking into hardtail right now i have been to 3 LBS, i have 2 more to visit and everywhere i go i hear something else. i just want a good bike to get started in the sport and do the things i said up there for 400-600 dollars. my problem is i am 6'2 225lbs and everyone says that i am to heavy for most shocks and i will break them if i try to drop off or jump anything so i am confused.

    i feel kinda dumb since i have been riding bmx for years but this is getting really complex fast and everyone tells me something different and you guys on here seem really knowledgeable so i hope u can help me out a bit. sorry about the long post.

  2. #2
    I wear two thongs
    Reputation: Eric Hoefer's Avatar
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    As for your bike needs I would look into this guy:
    http://www.rscycle.com/s.nl/it.A/id....=7&category=56


    The frame is built super tough and can take alot of abuse and marzocchi forks are liked among us bigger riders. Im 5'9 230 lbs and use a Marzocchi fork similar to that. And at $600 its in your price range. This bike is technically a Freeride bike and will be a bit heavier than your average cross country bike but being a big guy the overbuilt parts will come in handy.

    Some of the abbreviations you might have run into or at least the ones I can think of off the top of my head are:
    XC- cross country
    AM- All Mountain basically a type of biking that combines a little of everything
    DH- Downhill
    FR- Freeride
    BB- Bottom Bracket the bearing and axle that keeps your cranks attached to the bike
    LBS- Local Bike Shop (you already knew that though)
    SS- Single Speed

    Let us know if theres any more abbreviations you can think of that are bugging ya. and welcome to the boards!
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

  3. #3
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    you covered most of the terms. i made guesses but i wanted to make sure i was right. are iron horse bikes good? i bought the cheap ***** iron horse maverick and i like it but i know it wont take me to the level i want. i plan to give it to my wife for her b day and get me a new bike lol. so i have 3 weeks to figure out what i want. every store says avoid iron horse? i have been reccommended marin northside trail, specialized rockhopper, and gt avalanche 2.0. but i dont think those will alow me to do any freeriding if i came across it but i could be wrong. that iron horse u sent me looks really good what about the xc racing ones on that site are those good to?

  4. #4
    loves me some carbon
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    Yes they are.

    The current World Downhill Champs, (men's and women's) both ride Iron Horse. So yes, they make good bikes. I think you will find most bikes within a given price range meet the quality expected wihtin that range. What you will need to focus on is whether the bike is intended for jumping or not. There are lots of hard-tails around designed to cope with the kind of abuse urban hucksters like to dish out. You know, teenagers' parents are only willing to shell out so much, but the kids will immediately go out and hurl themselves off the biggest drop they can find. Ten years ago you would just break stuff doing this, but these days it is a pretty big market. Just be aware that the beefier frames, forks, & wheelsets designed to cope with this stuff are heavy and the bike will be harder to pedal around the place than a more cross-county oriented bike.
    Hope this helps.... That Iron Horse looks pretty good. Bmber forks are generally respected as bullet proof.

    b.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  5. #5
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    that bike he posted is looking really good to me i like all the specs and i have been reading its reviews and reviews of its parts. now i just need to figure out size, i am tall but i still want something ridable if i want a little bike i can go to my garage and get out my bmx so i am thinking 17 but i ride a 19.5 now it seems a little big to me. the only bad reviews i am seeing is the brakes but if they suck i can upgrade pretty easy cant i.

  6. #6
    loves me some carbon
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    The listed measurements are for the seat tube length. These days with so many bikes having low top tubes that measurement isn't that useful. You will need to know how long a bike you need. This can be fiddled a bit by swapping stems. The one shown is very short. This is where a good LBS is your friend. Hop on a range of bikes to get the right fit, and then get them to measure the distance from seat tube to handle bar. Then you will need to do a bit of cross referrencing to figure out the frame size you need. You will find quite a variation of top tube length across different brands. Good luck.
    Oh, yes, cable brakes can be a bit of a pain, but they are a very easy upgrade.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  7. #7
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    I personally run a set of those brakes on my hardtail and have no issues with them, they look like avid BB-7's in the picture and they are pretty highly regarded among cable discs.
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

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