1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Newbie Question (again)

    I just got my new bike (2005 rockhopper comp non-disc) and had a question about eventually upgrading to disc. I am not sure whether i want disc brakes at the moment, and the LBS didn't have a 2005 disc in my size.

    So if i wanted to upgrade to disc, does it make more sense for me to buy a wheelset or to buy rims and spokes? Which one is cheaper? Forgive me if this is a stupid question. I saw that you can buy a basic disc wheelset for under $100, and u can get a pair of deore hydro for under $100 as well

    I'll post some pics if there is interest......

  2. #2
    Full of holes
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    Just brakes.

    From Specialized website, it seems your bike has disc-ready hubs already. It looks something like this:



    You'll only need to buy rotors and brake levers for a retrofit.

    Only you can answer the question if you want to upgrade or not. It depends largely on the type of riding (and weather conditions) you do.

  3. #3
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    It's NOT disc ready

    Here's a link from Specialized's USA web site that has the specs for the '05 Rockhopper Comp (non-disc model):

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...keTab=techspec

    If it's a USA model, then it has Joytech hubs. I'm pretty sure these are not disc compatible. If it's a model other than USA, it could be that disc hubs were put on the bike.

    In any event, should you choose to go with discs, I'm going to say that the cost of buying the new hubs and spoeks and the labor to disassemble the old wheels and relace them with the new parts will probably exceeed the cost of a set of machine built wheels with Deore disc hubs. Check with your LBS and see what they say. If you can buy Deore hydro's as a set for under $100, that sounds like a decent option.

    I hope this info helps.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  4. #4
    pronounced may-duh
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    If your current hubs are non disc you will need to change them. Do you know how to tell?

    If you need to change the hubs I think getting a whole wheel will be cheaper. And when upgrading check out the avid cable discs. I hear they are not expensive and work great.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    Here's a link from Specialized's USA web site that has the specs for the '05 Rockhopper Comp (non-disc model):

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...keTab=techspec

    If it's a USA model, then it has Joytech hubs. I'm pretty sure these are not disc compatible. If it's a model other than USA, it could be that disc hubs were put on the bike.

    In any event, should you choose to go with discs, I'm going to say that the cost of buying the new hubs and spoeks and the labor to disassemble the old wheels and relace them with the new parts will probably exceeed the cost of a set of machine built wheels with Deore disc hubs. Check with your LBS and see what they say. If you can buy Deore hydro's as a set for under $100, that sounds like a decent option.

    I hope this info helps.

    Bob
    Is it just me or the specialized website says that the fork is disc-only

    EDIT: What do you guys think of hayes sole disc brakes? They are oem only, but you can find 'em on ebay
    Last edited by noobking314; 05-16-2006 at 04:03 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by noobking314
    Is it just me or the specialized website says that the fork is disc-only

    EDIT: What do you guys think of hayes sole disc brakes? They are oem only, but you can find 'em on ebay
    You'd be better off saving a few more dollars and getting a much better pair of hydraulic discs. Either that, or stick with BB7s from Avid.

  7. #7
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    i think most usa specialized hardrock and rockhoppers are either disc or NO disc (not disc upgradable). they are not too nice to get u ready for disc like trek or gf. no idea why they do that.

  8. #8
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    well you just have to upgrade the wheels right? i think my fork is disc-ready and that makes sense because otherwise specialized would have to order different forks

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by noobking314
    I just got my new bike (2005 rockhopper comp non-disc) and had a question about eventually upgrading to disc. I am not sure whether i want disc brakes at the moment, and the LBS didn't have a 2005 disc in my size.

    So if i wanted to upgrade to disc, does it make more sense for me to buy a wheelset or to buy rims and spokes? Which one is cheaper? Forgive me if this is a stupid question. I saw that you can buy a basic disc wheelset for under $100, and u can get a pair of deore hydro for under $100 as well

    I'll post some pics if there is interest......
    a ready made wheelset will be cheaper, unless you ride in wet conditions or downhill alot
    I'd stick with the brakes you've got, they are lighter, if adjusted right, stop you fine and you will save several hundred bucks

  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    Ride it as it is, unless you are wet and muddy all the time.
    Clean your rims and brakes after your rides, to keep the sand and mud from eating your rims and pads. (And, as you have your water, soap and brush out, you might as well flush most of the grit from the drive train and the rest of the bike too)

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