1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
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    Newbie needs advice

    Hi, I'm new to "adult" biking. I rode a road bike in my teenage years, but at 50 I decided to ride for fun and fitness.I got a used Trek Navigator 2.0 which is a comfort bike. I liked the idea that it has wide tires like a MB and a less aggressive tread for roads. I thought of a hybrid, but I didn't like the taller wheels. I'm short and like my center of gravity to be closer to the ground.

    Can I ride on MB trails with my bike? Is it a decent beginner bike for this or do I need to stay on roads and paths? I really want to get into MB trails once I get myself in better riding shape. I can ride on my farm, country roads and highway (wide shoulder).

    Any other advice on beginning would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    BMX:Our Shining Future
    Reputation: davidarnott's Avatar
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    welcome bikin cowgirl

    If your bike has gears you could ride it on significant off road areas. I am an older rider and recently realized that the new double suspended bikes lower the amount of shock to the body. Especially the hips. Making them ideal for us older riders. I strongly recommend them. Also they can go anywhere!

    It's a lot of pleasure riding country roads. I love them. And I am almost always alone.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Newbie needs advice-wr6.jpg  


  3. #3
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    Is that the bridge construction site at Moab?

  4. #4
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Trek Navigator... something like this?
    http://www.trekbikes.com/women/wsd_p...avigator20wsd/

    There's trails and there's "TRAILS". Some trails would be dangerous on your bike but the bike would probably let you know that it is out of its element. Soo, you can ride trails but better stay out of anything really rough on that bike.

    ... like, I don't think you should do this on your bike:



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wv7TyakE8qw

    (no, it is not me. Just a skilled guy on a tougher than average bike)

  5. #5
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    Trek Navigator... something like this?
    http://www.trekbikes.com/women/wsd_p...avigator20wsd/
    Yes, but no....mine is the men's version. It has the front and seat post suspension. I just don't know if it's geared like a MB.

    I don't plan on going on extreme trails, such as the video....but it does look like a lot of fun. I barrel race my horses, so I love an adrenalin rush.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Men's version good....

    That makes a stronger and stiffer construction.

    Have fun but remember that your bike has limitations when the going gets rough. If you have not ridden bikes on trails before, you have some limitations too

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    Trek lists it with a 48/38/28 crankset. Mountain bike cranksets tend to have 44/32/22 rings.

    EDIT: I do think adjustable stems are a little scary. It wouldn't hurt to pick up a plain one.

    It won't be any worse than mountain bikes in the early 90s as far as available gear ratios. You may have to climb out of the saddle more often, and you may run into a few more steep, loose climbs you just can't ride up. A lot of people can't ride their bikes up those no matter what gearing they have, so don't worry about it too much and go ride.

    If you like the sport, you can decide whether you want a purpose-built mountain bike or a new crankset, or you can just be the woman who smokes everyone on a hybrid. Our sport has existed a lot longer than much of the equipment people now consider necessary.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    Our sport has existed a lot longer than much of the equipment people now consider necessary.

    Things were a bit different in the old days, I hear, but people still had a good time on their bikes:.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h19n-5qIp78

    Of course, we cannot do without the latest equipment now (or at least more expensive than what the next guy has)

  9. #9
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    Welcome Cowgirl!! mM wife has a Navigator from 2003. For her ridding (easy flat paved/hard pack gravel) it is perfect!! She doesn't have the desire or skill to ride singletrack, or anything rocky/difficult.
    My opinion only is: The best bike.........the one you ride!! It's about having fun!! Welcome again and enjoy!!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

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