1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThrillSeeker2 View Post
    Because my father believes I'm not good at anythin. Therefore if I can show ow just a little bit of knowlegde towards bikes. It would.... ahh just forget it.
    OK. Park Tool sponsor a series of community college courses that go through all the basics of bike maintenance. They typically last a couple of weekends and cost around $130-$150, but could be well worth it to build up your knowledge base.

    Park Tool Co. The Park Tool School

    Sounds like you're a student, why not see if such a class is available as an elective this semester? You'd learn a thing or two about how to do your project (and a bunch of other bike maintenance tasks) the right way.

    Then next time your dad brakes a chain on the trail you'll have it covered

  2. #27
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    Dude, find a buddy who knows bikes. Surely someone you ride with knows how to wrench? If not, take your time and watch videos online.

    Better to be safe than sorry. Even a single improperly installed bolt could spell disaster for you.

  3. #28
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    Sorry I'm only getting into biking now. My dad bought me the stuff a few weeks ago

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThrillSeeker2 View Post
    Because my father believes I'm not good at anythin. Therefore if I can show ow just a little bit of knowlegde towards bikes. It would.... ahh just forget it.
    Im sincerely sorry to hear he thinks tjat way. I think you should call him out " hey dad, your right, im not good at much. Why dont you teach me?"

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  5. #30
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    He would probably say, you made it to college right? You figure it out

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThrillSeeker2 View Post
    He would probably say, you made it to college right? You figure it out
    Lol. Then say " **** you, pick the chamois out your ass"!!

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  7. #32
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    What started out as a brakes issue has quickly grown into something else. I'm sorry your dad is the way he is, and I'm sure there's a long story either of you can tell. But it seems to me like you've arrived at a fork in the road. Is it really important to you that you do this yourself?

    If not, then just take it to a bike shop, have them fix it, and go on living your life.

    If it's for the larger purpose of showing that you can actually do something with your own hands, then we'll try to help as best we can.

    Which is it going to be?

    Btw, your dad bought you a downhill bike...that's pretty cool isn't it?

  8. #33
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    Yep i agree. And cycling is a great sport with a lot of.different disciplines, hopefully dad being a ****** hasnt totally turned you off to the sport.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  9. #34
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    I really would like do do it myself but the thing is i don't feel comfortable doing it with something that can be so devistation of done wrong, and I agree its cool, I thanked him several times, but even a conversation lasting more than 5 min about bikes would be more than worth it

  10. #35
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    I see you've got some heavy circumstances on your hands, but don't allow your self worth to be shut by others. You have to first prove what your capabilities are to yourself, and other people will see it in their own time.

    The good news is, you're working with cable disc brakes, which are the easiest of brakes to work with. You've already gotten the fronts working, right? Seems like your rears are just a cable housing away from working too.

    If doing it yourself means a lot to you, don't be afraid. Are brakes high consequence items? Sure. But use common sense. When we're testing out brakes after working on them, we don't go bombing down a hill to see if they work. We'll do it at low speed in the driveway, so we can catch anything wrong before the stakes get high. What's the most complicated thing you've done before? Not just bikes, but anything.

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