1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    newb question/ before i spend the cash

    Looking for a mountain bike mainly for dirt road/ trail. I am trying to decide what to buy, but I spoke to my local bike shop and the salesman told me an entry level bike wouldn't support my size. I'm 6' about 260 lbs. He told me I would be better off with a bike in the $600- 1000 range because of a better wheel set. Any advice will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moooo!!!
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    Why don't you look at a Rockhopper Disc? It's in your price range for sure maybe cheaper if you get a sale. I got the comp disc for $748 from my local bike store, and I love it.
    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32233

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the link. So I take it I can't get away with 300- 400 bike?

  4. #4
    spec4life???..smh...
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc383
    So I take it I can't get away with 300- 400 bike?

    Im not so sure of that. That rockhopper and the hardrock sport, a $400 bike, have the same wheelset. So that isnt the factor. Sure i think you will need to purchase a heavier spring for your front fork, but that will be the case with most bikes, given your size.

    Check out the hardrock, its got a very solid beefy frame and double walled wheelset. I just dont see why this couldnt work for you. Iv never heard that you must have a more expensive bike just because you are heavier.

    Maybe they just want you to spend more......

  5. #5
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    The way he explained it made sense, but the bike he suggested that he had in stock was 900. He said it was a Durango d2? At least thats what it sounded like

  6. #6
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    At your size, I don't imagine you'll be happy with the performance of suspension forks in the $300-$400 range. I am your height and 120+ pounds lighter and I can't stand the way low-end suspension forks carry my weight, so you may really dislike them (or I may be crazy and you may not notice). I would consider something rigid and steel if I were you (Redline D440 is about $550 I think, and is a 29er which I would seriously consider).

  7. #7
    Moooo!!!
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    To give a whee bit of background. I'm 5' 7" and weigh a hefty 256 lbs. all of the low end specialized felt good and solid to me. I went with the expensive one because I am now biking to and from work as well as XC and trails. I saw no point in buying lower end for basically a car replacement and gym membership all rolled into one.

  8. #8
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    Dude, you are way into the Clydesdale category here. Cruise on over to that forum and ask the question. Me at around 200lbs taco'd the rims on a $1400 FS within a month, quite likely the same style of rims you will have on an entry level HT. An entry level frame/bike may be fine for you but as someone mentioned the front fork and definitely the wheels will need a hard look. In the end it may be cheaper to get a better bike than to upgrade the needed components to make it beefy enough to take the abuse you are going to give it just by riding. In any event, the guys on the Clyde board will be the ones who know the dope.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice, and pointing me in the right direction.

  10. #10
    Huge Bike Guy Person Man
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    i took my lbs' advice and the upsold me from what i wanted (08 hardrock disc) to a 08 rockhopper disc. after a set of wtb mutano-raptors, 2.4 front and 2.24 back, i have tossed this thing through some serious trails in my area, often at 25+mph (37.1mph top speed on road thus far, need a bigger hill, didnt even touch the top of my gearset!) through all kinds of awful brush (trails still dirty around here) and rock. I've done some decent drops, rode through shallow creek beds, as are common in my area on trails, done a significant amount of climbing, descending, as well as curb-hopping and traffic weaving around town.

    this bike should have folded under the pressure with what i'm doing, yet it remains firm! the front fork (dart 3) has had zero problems for me thusfar, all the parts are holding up very well, but the factory tires were not up to snuff for what I had in mind.

    all in all i'd say go for a rockhopper disc, white is it's sexiest color in 08, and to make your decision a little easier, i'm 6 foot 9, 275 pounds. i'm NOT easy on my bike. yet she holds up great! just about to take off on her in a few!

  11. #11
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    Well, I went to a bike shop out by my parents place and he has a rockhopper disc for 700 and a comp disc for 770. It was he lowest price I've seen, but the guy seems bent on convincing me to buy a full suspension. Looking at other shops, 770 for a comp disc seems like a pretty good deal.

  12. #12
    Huge Bike Guy Person Man
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    he seems bent on getting a full suspension commission in his pocket. don't let him sell you what you don't need ^.-

  13. #13
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    Whats funny, is another shop across town have a rockhopper comp disc for 950, but the salesman is trying to convince me that it's overkill and to buy this hardrock like his job depended on it.

  14. #14
    Huge Bike Guy Person Man
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    be honest about what you're riding now, what you want to ride later, and tell them your budget. as soon as they suggest something out of your budget, mention that you've scraped everything together to get to that budget, the money tree has been shaken empty. if they still recommend more expensive things, assess your budget vs what you want to ride. it appears you're after a hardtail, so tell them that. telling them you want something that will keep you on budget is a good way to go.

    think of the whole salesperson thing as a job interview, and you're hiring. don't be intimidated because "oh man they know so much more than me!" you know more about your bank account than they know about these bikes. when they shoot outside your limits, don't hire them ^.^ if they don't listen, don't send them home with a commission. those who are honest about what you need, generally have a better lbs environment. to me an lbs is a place to hang out even if you don't have anything to buy that day, but to chat with employees when they're free, to hear about what's new, to meet other riders etc. work on building a good relationship with a salesperson, make sure they remember you. get a good one going and keep buying from the one person, they'll get a feel and a respect for you if you don't cave to their paycheck.

    too many sales people these days just want a higher % off you, and the problem is they know they can get it. a lbs employee told me she had a customer with a $700 price range, and he walked out the door with a $2100 bike. for the sales person that's a good day, but it makes them believe that your budget is a fictional statistic, and that it doesnt exist. be firm, let them know that your piggy bank is broke, and you didnt even save money back for glue to put it back together. every dollar is on the table, don't let them upsale you.

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