1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Newb - need to replace cassette, need help

    I'm replacing the cassette on the back tire or at least I would like to. I don't know how to select a new cassette. What do I need to look for?

    I just got new SRAM X7 shifters and front/back derailluers.
    I have a Shimano Alivio crank (FM-MC20)

    Thanks in advance.......

  2. #2
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    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    Which cassette are you replacing and why are you replacing it? The only relevence the rest of your drivetrain has when you choose a new cassette is how many gears you need.
    The Shimano XT is generally considered the benchmark 9 speed cassette; it's strong, light and relatively inexspensive.
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  3. #3
    No good in rock gardens..
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    I'm assuming it's a 9 speed shifter set up? Each manufacturer makes a heirachy of cassesttes - the cheaper ones will be heavier and not have as nice a finish or nice shiny plating on it etc. They will still shift much the same, if the rest of the drivetrain (shifters, derailleur) is set up right.

    There are also slight differences in ratios - you can generally get 11-32 tooth options or 11-34. The more teeth the lower the gearing.

    Generally if you are replacing a cassette that's hada bit of use, you will need to replace the chain as well, as a worn chain may "skip" on the new cassette.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideknob
    Generally if you are replacing a cassette that's hada bit of use, you will need to replace the chain as well, as a worn chain may "skip" on the new cassette.
    Don't forget the middle and/or granny chainrings. If they look like throwing stars they will cause your new chain to skip under pressure. The general result of this is an unfortunate meeting between your gentlemens and the stem.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tebr73
    Don't forget the middle and/or granny chainrings. If they look like throwing stars they will cause your new chain to skip under pressure. The general result of this is an unfortunate meeting between your gentlemens and the stem.
    Very good point.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  6. #6
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    I find the Shimano LX cassettes to be very high quality at a decent price. If you want to stay with all SRAM parts I suggest the 970. The more expensive ones can be a few grams lighter. The cheaper ones don't have as strong a finish.

    Why are you replacing it? Is it worn?

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