1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    55

    new stem or laid back seat post?

    I dont know???

    When i ride if my seat isnt up about 7 inches off the frame it just dosent feel right. Once it feels right i think that the handlebars should be higher... Sometimes i like to lean back slightly and find myself not being able to with a full grip...

    what do you think? also if you have an opinion can you tell me the product that may work...

    still new...

    riding 20" Diamondback topanga comp im 6' 2" 320lbs.

    thanks..

  2. #2
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,772
    For pedaling efficiency, you should have the seat so high that you can barely pedal without rocking your hips when your HEELS are on the pedals. Then you have about the right height for normal pedaling with the balls of your feet on the pedals.

    Your seat set back is about right when the front of your knee is straight above the pedal axle, when the crank arm is pointing forward.

    If your frame is the right size for you (could not find geometry specs), you have a couple of options for raising the bar:
    - if there are spacers above the stem, move the spacers below the stem.
    - replace the stem with one that is angled up more (maybe a different length too?)
    - get a handlebar with more rise.

  3. #3
    Freshly Fujified
    Reputation: Call_me_Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,200

    Spacers above the stem?

    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    - if there are spacers above the stem, move the spacers below the stem.
    I'm trying to get a visual of this one. How does this work? As far as I can tell, it can't be done.
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  4. #4
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,772
    Let's see if I can illustrate this without a photo:
    I had a few spacers below the stem and wanted to lower the bar.
    Something like this (the short things are spacers, the long thing is the stem):

    =
    ===========O
    =
    =
    =

    I loosened the stem bolts, removed the bolt and cap at the top, took out the stem and a couple of spacers and put everything back in a different order and tightened all the bolts (the top bolt adjust the headset bearings, it needs to be tight enough but not so tight that steering becomes stiff):

    =
    =
    =
    ===========O
    =

    Actually I also flipped the stem to angle it downwards: I removed the bar from the stem and reassembled everything with the stem upside down.

  5. #5
    Freshly Fujified
    Reputation: Call_me_Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,200

    So basically....

    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Let's see if I can illustrate this without a photo:
    I had a few spacers below the stem and wanted to lower the bar.
    Something like this (the short things are spacers, the long thing is the stem):

    =
    ===========O
    =
    =
    =

    I loosened the stem bolts, removed the bolt and cap at the top, took out the stem and a couple of spacers and put everything back in a different order and tightened all the bolts (the top bolt adjust the headset bearings, it needs to be tight enough but not so tight that steering becomes stiff):

    =
    =
    =
    ===========O
    =

    Actually I also flipped the stem to angle it downwards: I removed the bar from the stem and reassembled everything with the stem upside down.
    To tighten this down, the top cap sits on top of the spacer, which sits on top of the stem? My puzzlement was based on youw you tighten down a spacer when it sits on top of the stem (which typically has the top cap and screw). Do I have this right now?

    Thanks for the explanation. Let me know if I have it right.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,772
    The cap and bolt are not fixed to the stem. It does not matter where the spacers are, as long as the cap and bolt are on top of everything and there are enough spacers for the remaining steerer tube.

    The bolts on the stem must be tightened last.

    .... It may be that bikes are sold with the bar as high as possible. Then you can only move the bar down. Right now I have about an inch of spacers above the stem.

  7. #7
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,614

    Classic fit models may not work for you because of your magnificence.

    Seat position, height and knee position relative to the peda,l will work fine. Working out how you want to support your upper body weight is a very different thing. It takes a lot of riding to warrent the "attack" postion. A whole musculature must be developed along with the handling skills which go along with it to make for enjoyable riding. With your size you may tend to plant yourself a bit more upright on the seat which will require a shorter stem. Also you will have to make certain the at the seatpost you use is sturdy.
    As you progress and put more power to the pedals you will put less strain on the seatpost, more on the pedals, and start to move your upper body forward. It takes time.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 05-29-2006 at 10:05 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •