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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm New riders, just try this,

    Never been out on the trails,
    No Idea what Its like or just a few clumsy rides on a borrowed bike,
    Smart enough to NOT buy a department store bike,


    Go out to the trail head where you hope to ride and see what every body Is riding.
    I bet you will see two or three makers dominating the others with sheer numbers.
    Ask several of those rides, no make that a dozen or more, ask them where is a good local bike shop.

    Soon as you get several mentioning the same shop go there.
    Buy the bike they tell you to by and if they try and upsell you to a level above what you can afford, just do it. That's what Credit Cards are for.

    Tell them where you will be riding, then get the ride gear they say you need.

    Then go ride.

    Your just gonna get fatter and older sitting In front of your puter' spending time here asking the same questions your going to ask the bike shop people anyway.

    Then get out there and do it.
    Death awaits us all, no time to waste,
    Go,
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    if they try and upsell you to a level above what you can afford, just do it. That's what Credit Cards are for.
    Don't do this. Do not buy a bike that's not well within your budget and certainly not one you can't even pay for outright. That's how things spiral out of control financially.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Never been out on the trails,
    No Idea what Its like or just a few clumsy rides on a borrowed bike,
    Smart enough to NOT buy a department store bike,


    Go out to the trail head where you hope to ride and see what every body Is riding.
    I bet you will see two or three makers dominating the others with sheer numbers.
    Ask several of those rides, no make that a dozen or more, ask them where is a good local bike shop.

    Soon as you get several mentioning the same shop go there.
    Buy the bike they tell you to by and if they try and upsell you to a level above what you can afford, just do it. That's what Credit Cards are for.

    Tell them where you will be riding, then get the ride gear they say you need.

    Then go ride.

    Your just gonna get fatter and older sitting In front of your puter' spending time here asking the same questions your going to ask the bike shop people anyway.

    Then get out there and do it.
    Death awaits us all, no time to waste,
    Go,
    NOW
    Or buy a nice used bike from someone who took Osco's advice and then decided that mountain biking wasn't for him (or her).

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  4. #4
    jcd's best friend
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Don't do this. Do not buy a bike that's not well within your budget and certainly not one you can't even pay for outright. That's how things spiral out of control financially.
    Osco posted up a type of poem talking about a newbie rider and the types of situations they may get themselves into while diving into the world of mountain biking.

    Besides, I buy bikes every now and then with zero percent interest and I just pay it off within a couple of months
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    No one ever told me to go spend $1500.00 on a bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Go spend $1500 on a bike! Do it now!

  5. #5
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    Here in DFW, which isn't exactly MTB paradise, but we have a community, you'd get no consensus on brand or shop, but you might count more Specs than anything else, maybe Trek.

    And a newb probably wouldn't have the faintest idea "what kind of trails he rides." Even here, there's totally flat stuff, chunky stuff, and downy jumpy stuff.

    I think a rider adopting your strategy stands a reasonable chance of being just as confused as wandering around in here, and $2-4k poorer than necessary, and having the wrong bike for what they want to do.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Or buy a nice used bike from someone who took Osco's advice and then decided that mountain biking wasn't for him (or her).

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Agreed, it's absolutely ridiculous advice to suggest someone go to a LBS with a blank cheque for their first bike. There is so much choice in mountain biking much of which comes down to personal preference and the shop are unlikely to know what you want or need in a ride, when I started off mountain biking I bought a second hand entry level hardtail (mostly Deore parts). After riding for a while and getting an idea what and how I wanted to ride then I bought another bike.

    I've never been to a trail where you will see any brand or even bike type dominating more than any other with a mix of different brands, rim sizes, tyre widths, and frame types.

    The OP's advice is so bad I'm wondering is it meant to be a joke?
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  7. #7
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    I was in this position recently and was overwhelmed with the myriad of seemingly awesome bikes available nowadays. My problem was that I don't really know anyone who rides MTB seriously that I could go to for advice on my first "real" bike, and had I just based my decision on what "everyone is riding" on my local trails, I would have ended up spending 5K on a Pivot or Santa Cruz. I'm sure that I would have been happy with one of those bikes, but there is no way I could justify dropping that much cash right out of the gate without first getting a feel for whether this sport was for me or not.

    FWIW, I ended up getting a great deal on a new Marin Rift Zone 2 and definitely have the MTB bug now. It's only been a couple of weeks, but I plan to stick with this until I "outgrow" the capabilities of this bike before upgrading to a higher end bike like the ones everyone else is riding. Who knows if/when that will happen.

    My opinion on this topic is for noobs to be realistic with your budget and try and pick up something with decent resale value (used?) so you can unload it with minimal damage to the finances if you decide MTB isn't for you, or if you absolutely love it and want "more" bike right away. More importantly, I found that I am learning way more about mountain biking just by *being on a bike and riding* rather than sitting at my computer reading about it and debating which bike I should get.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyberThreat View Post

    My opinion on this topic is for noobs to be realistic with your budget and try and pick up something with decent resale value (used?) so you can unload it with minimal damage to the finances

    Good luck with that. Low end bikes have nill resale value, in that I'd say Osco's advice is actually insightful.
    How many newbs spend over $3500 on a first bike?
    How many newbs go & try to hang with their mates on a klunker and get turned off by the experience?
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  9. #9
    Bikesexual
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    I agree the budget is the number one item to sort out. Work around that starting budget to get riding.

    Everthing else IF one sticks to the sport, will sort itself out.

    I'm a fan of Osco's posts, he is one of the guys that usually contributes a lot in the beginner's corner. Not sure about the finance advice.

    So yes first thing is get a bike within budget, and get the hell out on those trails!

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    just get a bike and ride!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Good luck with that. Low end bikes have nill resale value, in that I'd say Osco's advice is actually insightful.
    High end bikes may retain a higher percentage of their value but you're going to lose more money. Add to that the fact that new buyers don't understand what they're buying. My first mtb was too small, thankfully it wasn't a $3500 bike.

    How many newbs go & try to hang with their mates on a klunker and get turned off by the experience?
    They're not going to be able to hang with an experienced rider either way.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Good luck with that. Low end bikes have nill resale value, in that I'd say Osco's advice is actually insightful.
    How many newbs spend over $3500 on a first bike?
    How many newbs go & try to hang with their mates on a klunker and get turned off by the experience?
    Points well taken. Just speaking from my (extremely) limited experience and perspective.
    OP did suggest to just "get out and ride", which I think is the big take away from this post, at least for me. :P

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Don't do this. Do not buy a bike that's not well within your budget and certainly not one you can't even pay for outright. That's how things spiral out of control financially.
    This is why there are thousands of $2000-3000 bikes with 30 miles on them sitting in garages right now, collecting dust, because the newbie rider 'thought' they were going to get into riding, and then something else happened, a new hobby, marriage, job relocation, etc. You have to crawl before you learn to walk. Don't leapfrog the natural course of events.
    Hypercritical is good. Hypocritical is bad. Nice people can still be bad people.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyberThreat View Post
    My opinion on this topic is for noobs to be realistic with your budget

    Unfortunately you will not find a lot of realistic opinions in this forum. What you will find is opinions that everyone else should be riding the exact same bike as 'me', the same style, the same speed downhill, the same jumps, drops, etc.

    That is just about the most unrealistic thing to think for beginners.
    Hypercritical is good. Hypocritical is bad. Nice people can still be bad people.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    .....in that I'd say Osco's advice is actually insightful.

    This thread? I agree with the above poster who thought Osco was probably joking.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  15. #15
    Bikesexual
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Unfortunately you will not find a lot of realistic opinions in this forum. What you will find is opinions that everyone else should be riding the exact same bike as 'me', the same style, the same speed downhill, the same jumps, drops, etc.

    That is just about the most unrealistic thing to think for beginners.
    Rich, you always make this comment, and I always question it. It will be nice to back it up with some proof.

    People come in here with all sorts of budgets and situations. From a 90's Treks of CL to new Santa Cruz/Pivot from a shop. I think the feedback (for the MOST part) fits the requirements of the new rider.

    No one ever told me to go spend $1500.00 on a bike. By following some advice given here, I went with BD - $299.00 bike. I couldn't even think of spending $800.00 on a "bike", boy was I wrong LOL. But buying better bikes was MY decision, I fell in love with the sport, and now I know why a better bike IS better than a POS.

    None of my bikes are high end, but I have tons of FUN riding them. That's the ultimate goal as far as I'm concerned.

    So my question is, where are all these "ride my bike or else" comments? I've seen a couple of posters give that kind of advice, or Plus tires or nothing works.. etc. Overall, I think everyone tries to help within the situation of the poster.

    At the end of the day, those of us that have taken to the sport KNOW a better bike, delivers a better ride, but is not necessary to have fun.
    just get a bike and ride!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Good luck with that. Low end bikes have nill resale value, in that I'd say Osco's advice is actually insightful.
    How many newbs spend over $3500 on a first bike?
    How many newbs go & try to hang with their mates on a klunker and get turned off by the experience?
    Low end bikes may have little resale value but they'll lose far less than an expensive bike, my first Trek hardtail cost me £400 and selling on again I could have easily got a couple of hundred for it. The Fuel cost me £2500 and within the year had lost at least £1500 once they were selling them on clear out for 50% off, I thought it was the bike for me but after a year decided it wasn't and when I came to sell it the bike was worth just £600-£700.

    You seem to be working on the assumption that if someone spends a lot on a bike they'll definitely stick with it whereas they won't on a cheap bike but neither are true, a beginner rider won't know what they'll want from a bike so could easily end up losing a huge chunk of money on a higher end bike when they don't keep riding or they find it's not what they want at all.

    I see it time and time again beginners turning up with a really nice enduro bike thinking it's the do all bike for them and then within a few months it's disappeared because it turns out they didn't like the bike after all. Any experienced rider recommending such a flawed approach is definitely not insightful.

    Also you can get cheap bikes that are not 'clunkers', I ride the same trails now as I did on my original Trek hardtail and having a higher end bike would not have made it any easier for me to 'hang with my mates' as it was my skills I needed to build up.
    2014 Trek Fuel Ex 8
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Unfortunately you will not find a lot of realistic opinions in this forum. What you will find is opinions that everyone else should be riding the exact same bike as 'me', the same style, the same speed downhill, the same jumps, drops, etc.

    .
    Actually I'll put this as more insightful.

    What I see regionally is people over their heads on bikes that aren't up for the task. That implies neither were they obviously. I come across them and they have that defeated air about them. With more practise and a bit more capable bike would they have had a better experience? I think yes. Would that translate into more probability of sticking with it? Again I think so.

    My original comment was more reflective of what newbs perceive as being expensive in this sport...steep learning curve there. Of coarse I had a blast on a fully rigid with canti brakes, road geometry, and worthless tires by today's standards. Then again what we (regionally) call mountain biking is far different as well. Personally I think spending more up front nets a better user experience. Fun capable bikes are fun to ride, regionally.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  18. #18
    jcd's best friend
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    No one ever told me to go spend $1500.00 on a bike.
    Go spend $1500 on a bike! Do it now!

    New riders, just try this,-stop-whining-do-now.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    No one ever told me to go spend $1500.00 on a bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Go spend $1500 on a bike! Do it now!

  19. #19
    Bikesexual
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Go spend $1500 on a bike! Do it now!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Hey bro, that is You right there!

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    just get a bike and ride!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Hey bro, that is You right there!

    Sent from my LGMS210 using Tapatalk
    Damn right! I am pretty bad lol!
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    No one ever told me to go spend $1500.00 on a bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Go spend $1500 on a bike! Do it now!

  21. #21
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    As a complete noob that rode very little a long time ago, and just got into riding again I’m not against anyone’s advice here...... here is my .02cents

    Each of us has own level of inner drive and commitment when it comes to sticking with something and riding enough to improve so that it becomes that much more enjoyable. Whether starting on a cheaper second hand bike, or something a bit nicer. anyone just starting should expect it to kick their ass for longer than they thought. It is pretty disheartening when you head to the trail and can’t make it around, then have folks 10 years older ride by as you walk your bike up the slightest inclines in the trail.

    The advice to seek out the best LBS is very good, and it will always be the nature of the beast that they will try to “upsell”. They aren’t lying to you, that bike IS Better than what you were looking at, and may be the right one for the trails or area you have planned to start riding. None of that will make YOU any better, but it may or may not make you want to ride more. So maybe the first bike should be purchased for whatever $$ you are willing to lose, since you will either have a cheap bike that won’t sell, or won’t want to sell your nice bike for that much of a loss.

    Whichever bike you get some of the best advice is to get out and ride it as much as possible. Don’t get discouraged when you start asking yourself what the hell you got yourself into about 3 miles or less into the first difficult trail ride. It won’t get easy, but it will get easier...... then it becomes more fun as you start beating your PB’s and paying attention to how long it takes better riders to lap the same trail.

    Then if you like it and have stuck it out (for a shorter time than you thought it would be as you walked up the trail on day 1) you will be wanting that bike that you didn’t get in the first place. Or you will start thinking of what upgrades to put on the bike you did buy (which still won’t make you any better, but you will still want them).

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    anyone just starting should expect it to kick their ass for longer than they thought. It is pretty disheartening when you head to the trail and can’t make it around, then have folks 10 years older ride by as you walk your bike up the slightest inclines in the trail.
    This

    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    paying attention to how long it takes better riders to lap the same trail.
    Also quite discouraging. And they make it look so easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    Then if you like it and have stuck it out (for a shorter time than you thought it would be as you walked up the trail on day 1)
    Shorter? Nope. Not for me, you had it right the first time:
    Quote Originally Posted by Bills View Post
    anyone just starting should expect it to kick their ass for longer than they thought.
    l don't expect it to ever stop, actually.
    Last edited by andytiedye; 1 Week Ago at 11:28 PM.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ...

    At the end of the day, those of us that have taken to the sport KNOW a better bike, delivers a better ride, but is not necessary to have fun.
    This is pretty much the best line in the entire thread; get a bike and have fun, whether it costs $399.00 or $3999.00. Either way, you're out being active, hopefully enjoying it, and building your skill.

  24. #24
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
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    ^^^Maybe even make a friend or two along the way.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I agree the budget is the number one item to sort out. Work around that starting budget to get riding.

    Everthing else IF one sticks to the sport, will sort itself out.

    I'm a fan of Osco's posts, he is one of the guys that usually contributes a lot in the beginner's corner. Not sure about the finance advice.

    So yes first thing is get a bike within budget, and get the hell out on those trails!

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    +
    I have to add that most won't follow verbatim but will 'read between the lines' so-to-speak meaning they'll find their own comfort zone for spending but the main theme (Osco) is really 'the right' message.

    Exceptional circumstances can happen though as did a few months ago.
    If as a noob soon.to.be shopper, you happen to see a group of test riders of SRAM Holdings Corp in the old RockShox test areas, you might see $45,000 in bikes and discount the idea of matching up to what they have for bikes and equipment. At least your first bike.

    *Maybe a moot point though since some or much of the goods are prototype anyways.
    Last edited by bachman1961; 6 Days Ago at 01:08 AM.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  26. #26
    Lone Wolf
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    I had a mouse, yep I said 'Mouse' leap onto my face and scream yesterday.

    Of course I crashed,

    Never saw the mouse again. He must have been on a low tree limb, IDK,,,,,,,
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

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