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  1. #1
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    New rider necessities?

    Okay, I have the bike now, and I also have a helmet and gloves. I know I need a compact pump, a spare tube, and some sort of bike multitool. What else is necessary for moderate trails in Georgia? Pads? What type of shoes? My running shoes don't seem to be the best option, but I'd prefer not to spend $100 on shoes strictly for biking. Maybe some flat bottom skateboard type shoes? What makes the shoe practical for biking?

    Also, I bought a cheaper $30 pair of bike shorts, and, without being too vulgar, the crotch just wasn't wide enough. What the pad was supposed to protect kept coming off of both sides, and rubbing the wrong way. I assume better shorts wouldn't do this. Do most people use bike shorts on mountain bikes?

    Sorry for all the stupid questions. I'm just trying to learn what I'm doing, and have really appreciated the help I have received from this site.

  2. #2
    Knowledge over Swag
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    http://www.mountaingear.com/pages/pr...tem/214109/N/0 five ten freeriders @ $65. Pretty much best mtb shoes. I would get a patch kits as well. Also, if you get a mini-pump w/o a gauge get a tire pressure reader as well.

  3. #3
    Just Ride
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    Get a camelbak or equivalent water backpack. I LOVE mine, as I found bottles to be a nuisance. Always flying off the bike, plus they just don't hold enough water for me.

    Can't help ya on the bike shorts issue. I just wear regular workout shorts. Very loose and comfortable. They work for me anyway.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  4. #4
    It's all about the FSR!
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    I have found that every pair of bike shorts fits differently. I have had good luck so far with Sugoi and Fox. Both fit me perfectly. Not so much with Bellweather.

    On to the necessities. If you plan on carrying a small pump and tube, you will need tire levers to get the tire off the wheel if you flat. They are inexpensive, but are a necessity. A good multi-tool is also needed.

    As others have suggested the other stuff, I am going to go out and mention something to protect your cellphone. Either a case or dry place to put it in your pack. It is probably the most invaluable tool should something go wrong, which all hope won't. I used mine, yesterday, in a race, because I missed a turn. Still had the email from the race crew with their phone numbers in it, so I pulled off and gave em a quick call. That saved a lot of heartache and wasted time. I have also had to use it on the trail before. I won't ride without it now.

  5. #5
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    Shorts and liner...
    Originally... in the 'old days'... the chamois was real chamois... leather... and it absorbed the sweat in the crotch area... it wasn't meant to 'pad' anything
    Even today... I have not found a liner built that would adequately 'protect' the jewels (or jewelettes), and they offer minimal padding for comfort. But they seem to be better-than-nothing for most folks
    If you are 'hanging' off the sides, perhaps you need some sort of support. Wear some lightweight underwear. You don't have to go all "commando" in your bike shorts just because someone else does. Guys can wear jockstraps, both sexes can wear thongs. Whatever 'floats your boat' and keeps everything neat and tidy

    Shoes...
    If necessary, take one of your pedals in to the shoe store where you are planning on buying your shoes (especially if you're planning on using sk8r shoes or something non-bike)... clean it first... then see how the sole mates up to the pedal (assuming we're talking about flats here).
    For flats... you want some stiffness in the sole, and 'stickiness' in the tread to help keep your feet on the pedals. As mentioned, 5.10's are popular (the actual bike shoe), and if you change your mind about the $100... Teva's Links are, IMHO, great shoes! I've been riding a pair for 2 months and many miles and I love mine... even if they are purple!

    I find that the tread on my sk8 shoes is too hard and slips off my flats too easily.
    With my flats, an SPD compatible shoe seems to get chewed up from the pins.
    A really soft sole will not only affect pedaling, but could make your feet sore after a long mtb ride.

    The hard, bike shoes are another story. I find that most of them run on the narrow side (damn skinny Euro feet! ) and I have a hard time finding a pair that fit comfortably on my wide American feet
    I actually found two different pairs of Specialized Tahoes WITH pedals on Craigslist for $35 each over the course of a couple of years. They were clean, in good shape, and size 13!

    Water...
    Camelbacks (and other brand of hydration packs like Osprey) are nice, but depending on the ride, you might not want all that on your back.
    I have ridden plenty of trail with guys who still carry water bottles... and never lose one. Of course, we're not riding the North Shore, Whistler, the escarpments of Moab....
    But we still ride some decent downhill/singletrack and they seem to keep their bottles on somehow

    Tools:
    A mini-pump is nice... I have a Planet Bike one, but I mostly just carry my CO2 inflator.
    WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN' GAUGES! I just inflate to thumb pressure on the trail.
    But by all means, carry a gauge or buy a pump with a built in one if you so desire.
    Definitely tire tools, patch kit, zip-ties, a schraeder/presta adapter tip, tube(for my tubed wheels)... eh... not sure what else

    Multitool...
    The first one you buy... well... just that... it'll only be the FIRST one you buy Once you figure out the tools you are missing on that one that your bike needs, or you see someone whip out a better one on the trail with more/less doo-dads than yours and you start Jones'n for theirs, you'll start cruizin the tool department of your LBS like a junkie!

    For carrying tools...
    I like the Ortlieb waterproof seat bag... medium size. It holds most of my tools and a tube, zip ties, CO2 inflator, and in my rainy, muddy, home area, keeps things dry and clean.
    I ride with guys who still sport FANNY PACKS What fashion disaster that is! But they don't seem to care.

    Protection...
    Phone/iPod... already mentioned earlier... get something to protect them or you will wind up with cracked screens and such if you just carry it in the pocket of your shorts.

    You... If you are starting out and the trail is more than a flat, nicely groomed, path with no bumps, dips, rocks or roots... wear some leg protection and perhaps elbow/forearm protection. You have a helmet so you melon is safe. I started out with T.H.E. knee and leg covers (can't remember which ones). They are vented really well in the back, slip up over the leg (so I can't put them on OVER my shoes... bummer). But you should see how chewed up the plastic fronts are! Most of that though is probably from the pins on my pedals .
    When I wear pads now, I typically wear my Kali knee and elbow pads. I like them so much I now have two sets... Grey and Green... WooHoo

    Besides protection from pedals, rocks, trees and the like... you also get protection from plants that are pointy, sticky, stingy, and possibly highly irritating (as in poison oak/ivy).

    Depending on what your legs looks like (sticks, posts, or Popeye's arms), you really want to try them on before buying leg protection! Try them on with the shorts you ride in too... so you know if the shorts are going to sit above the knees, slip down over or under the knee pads...

    You EYES!... Protect thine eyes! Some folks get by with safety glasses for a while, others spring for a good pair of biking frames. I was/am both
    I now prefer the Native soft tip frames. I can switch out lenses from the cool green sunglass type shading... to some hip multi-colored but almost clear shading.
    They cost just over $100, but on longer rides I no longer get headaches from the hard temples of my other frames... plus they vent better than any other frames I have owned.

    If you don't like those long floppy fenders on your bike, you can improvise with things like...
    bike tubes sections opened up and zip-tied between your fork stanchions, milk jugs cut to precise shapes and zip-tied strategically in places on your bike, cardboard... heck, I've seen some real interesting mod's for stopping all the mud-flinging (biking, of course... I'm not talking politics here )

    If you are apt to wind up late out on the trails... as the light starts to fade... one of those little headlamps and those cute little tail lights will work in a pinch and not cost all that much. But... BIGGER BRIGHTER lights can be had... which will allow you to mtb IN THE DEEPEST DARKEST NIGHTS! Scarrrrrry fun! Bwahahahaha

    I swear... I'll keep this short...

    Don't forget the extra large towel or table cloth or something to cover your car/truck seat after a wet/muddy ride! Also, water or other rehydrating liquid that is legal for driving and drinking, maybe food (if you don't have bears that like to open up cars because they think you left them goodies inside).

    Finally... yes... I mean it!...
    A first aid kit! For your body or someone else's!
    I have been working in the emergency medical field for a long time, so I carry stuff you might not, but I still keep it compact.
    Basically you want to stop bleeding... so some sort of sterile field to put directly on wounds is nice. After that... you can pack other absorbable material on top... socks, bandanas, the liner from your shorts?
    You want to keep the bandage in place, so something to make it stay... roller gauze/kerlix/kling, bandana, strips of clothing, but DO NOT USE THE ZIP TIES!

    Maybe you broke something or someone's neck got hurt? you can fashion a splint/neck brace (not a great one but a serviceable one) out of a SAM splint. They fit in a camelback really well.

    If it's a day ride, you don't need to carry a bunch of wound cleansing liquids or ointments.
    Use the cleanest water available (now the bike water bottle comes in handy, just figure out who in your group has the better dental hygiene ) and flush out all that grit, dirt, rock, stick, and whatnot, then bandage it all up.

    Steri-strips/Butterfly bandages, are good for closing gaping cuts.

    Seriously... take a first-aid course... or even better... a first responder or wilderness first-aid/first responder course.

    I also carry an OA (oral airway) and a couple of other items I'm trained to use, but again... I don't try to carry a full-on trauma bag or else I might as well be flying a helo instead of taking the bike...

    Duct tape is great not just for emergency first aid... it gets rid of warts too! But you won't likely have that issue on the trail even if you do kiss a few toads along the way.

    Wasn't I supposed to keep this short???

  6. #6
    DynoDon
    Reputation: manabiker's Avatar
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    spare derailleur hanger, Crank Bros multi tool comes with its own case, I put duct tape on mine (good stuff to have) and some band aids inside with the tool. Leatherman if you want more tools, money, tire boot, gu gels, co2 air pump, and hand pump, spart tube, and patch kit, wipes or paper towels.
    Four wheels transport the body,

    Two wheels transport the soul !!!!

  7. #7
    T.W.O.
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    wsmac, that's an awesome post.

  8. #8
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
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    ^^This^^

    Quote Originally Posted by wsmac View Post
    Shorts and liner...
    Originally... in the 'old days'... the chamois was real chamois... leather... and it absorbed the sweat in the crotch area... it wasn't meant to 'pad' anything
    Even today... I have not found a liner built that would adequately 'protect' the jewels (or jewelettes), and they offer minimal padding for comfort. But they seem to be better-than-nothing for most folks
    If you are 'hanging' off the sides, perhaps you need some sort of support. Wear some lightweight underwear. You don't have to go all "commando" in your bike shorts just because someone else does. Guys can wear jockstraps, both sexes can wear thongs. Whatever 'floats your boat' and keeps everything neat and tidy

    Shoes...
    If necessary, take one of your pedals in to the shoe store where you are planning on buying your shoes (especially if you're planning on using sk8r shoes or something non-bike)... clean it first... then see how the sole mates up to the pedal (assuming we're talking about flats here).
    For flats... you want some stiffness in the sole, and 'stickiness' in the tread to help keep your feet on the pedals. As mentioned, 5.10's are popular (the actual bike shoe), and if you change your mind about the $100... Teva's Links are, IMHO, great shoes! I've been riding a pair for 2 months and many miles and I love mine... even if they are purple!

    I find that the tread on my sk8 shoes is too hard and slips off my flats too easily.
    With my flats, an SPD compatible shoe seems to get chewed up from the pins.
    A really soft sole will not only affect pedaling, but could make your feet sore after a long mtb ride.

    The hard, bike shoes are another story. I find that most of them run on the narrow side (damn skinny Euro feet! ) and I have a hard time finding a pair that fit comfortably on my wide American feet
    I actually found two different pairs of Specialized Tahoes WITH pedals on Craigslist for $35 each over the course of a couple of years. They were clean, in good shape, and size 13!

    Water...
    Camelbacks (and other brand of hydration packs like Osprey) are nice, but depending on the ride, you might not want all that on your back.
    I have ridden plenty of trail with guys who still carry water bottles... and never lose one. Of course, we're not riding the North Shore, Whistler, the escarpments of Moab....
    But we still ride some decent downhill/singletrack and they seem to keep their bottles on somehow

    Tools:
    A mini-pump is nice... I have a Planet Bike one, but I mostly just carry my CO2 inflator.
    WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN' GAUGES! I just inflate to thumb pressure on the trail.
    But by all means, carry a gauge or buy a pump with a built in one if you so desire.
    Definitely tire tools, patch kit, zip-ties, a schraeder/presta adapter tip, tube(for my tubed wheels)... eh... not sure what else

    Multitool...
    The first one you buy... well... just that... it'll only be the FIRST one you buy Once you figure out the tools you are missing on that one that your bike needs, or you see someone whip out a better one on the trail with more/less doo-dads than yours and you start Jones'n for theirs, you'll start cruizin the tool department of your LBS like a junkie!

    For carrying tools...
    I like the Ortlieb waterproof seat bag... medium size. It holds most of my tools and a tube, zip ties, CO2 inflator, and in my rainy, muddy, home area, keeps things dry and clean.
    I ride with guys who still sport FANNY PACKS What fashion disaster that is! But they don't seem to care.

    Protection...
    Phone/iPod... already mentioned earlier... get something to protect them or you will wind up with cracked screens and such if you just carry it in the pocket of your shorts.

    You... If you are starting out and the trail is more than a flat, nicely groomed, path with no bumps, dips, rocks or roots... wear some leg protection and perhaps elbow/forearm protection. You have a helmet so you melon is safe. I started out with T.H.E. knee and leg covers (can't remember which ones). They are vented really well in the back, slip up over the leg (so I can't put them on OVER my shoes... bummer). But you should see how chewed up the plastic fronts are! Most of that though is probably from the pins on my pedals .
    When I wear pads now, I typically wear my Kali knee and elbow pads. I like them so much I now have two sets... Grey and Green... WooHoo

    Besides protection from pedals, rocks, trees and the like... you also get protection from plants that are pointy, sticky, stingy, and possibly highly irritating (as in poison oak/ivy).

    Depending on what your legs looks like (sticks, posts, or Popeye's arms), you really want to try them on before buying leg protection! Try them on with the shorts you ride in too... so you know if the shorts are going to sit above the knees, slip down over or under the knee pads...

    You EYES!... Protect thine eyes! Some folks get by with safety glasses for a while, others spring for a good pair of biking frames. I was/am both
    I now prefer the Native soft tip frames. I can switch out lenses from the cool green sunglass type shading... to some hip multi-colored but almost clear shading.
    They cost just over $100, but on longer rides I no longer get headaches from the hard temples of my other frames... plus they vent better than any other frames I have owned.

    If you don't like those long floppy fenders on your bike, you can improvise with things like...
    bike tubes sections opened up and zip-tied between your fork stanchions, milk jugs cut to precise shapes and zip-tied strategically in places on your bike, cardboard... heck, I've seen some real interesting mod's for stopping all the mud-flinging (biking, of course... I'm not talking politics here )

    If you are apt to wind up late out on the trails... as the light starts to fade... one of those little headlamps and those cute little tail lights will work in a pinch and not cost all that much. But... BIGGER BRIGHTER lights can be had... which will allow you to mtb IN THE DEEPEST DARKEST NIGHTS! Scarrrrrry fun! Bwahahahaha

    I swear... I'll keep this short...

    Don't forget the extra large towel or table cloth or something to cover your car/truck seat after a wet/muddy ride! Also, water or other rehydrating liquid that is legal for driving and drinking, maybe food (if you don't have bears that like to open up cars because they think you left them goodies inside).

    Finally... yes... I mean it!...
    A first aid kit! For your body or someone else's!
    I have been working in the emergency medical field for a long time, so I carry stuff you might not, but I still keep it compact.
    Basically you want to stop bleeding... so some sort of sterile field to put directly on wounds is nice. After that... you can pack other absorbable material on top... socks, bandanas, the liner from your shorts?
    You want to keep the bandage in place, so something to make it stay... roller gauze/kerlix/kling, bandana, strips of clothing, but DO NOT USE THE ZIP TIES!

    Maybe you broke something or someone's neck got hurt? you can fashion a splint/neck brace (not a great one but a serviceable one) out of a SAM splint. They fit in a camelback really well.

    If it's a day ride, you don't need to carry a bunch of wound cleansing liquids or ointments.
    Use the cleanest water available (now the bike water bottle comes in handy, just figure out who in your group has the better dental hygiene ) and flush out all that grit, dirt, rock, stick, and whatnot, then bandage it all up.

    Steri-strips/Butterfly bandages, are good for closing gaping cuts.

    Seriously... take a first-aid course... or even better... a first responder or wilderness first-aid/first responder course.

    I also carry an OA (oral airway) and a couple of other items I'm trained to use, but again... I don't try to carry a full-on trauma bag or else I might as well be flying a helo instead of taking the bike...

    Duct tape is great not just for emergency first aid... it gets rid of warts too! But you won't likely have that issue on the trail even if you do kiss a few toads along the way.

    Wasn't I supposed to keep this short???
    And this at the top of the forum: Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    The closer I am to home (and to an emergency room), the less first aid materials I carry. When I'm further out on longer trails, I'll carry more of everything (parts and 1st aid).
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsmac View Post
    Shorts and liner...
    I ride with guys who still sport FANNY PACKS What fashion disaster that is! But they don't seem to care.
    You must ride with my husband! (ok, and I'll admit ... me)

  10. #10
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    What you really need is this a speaker bar connected to an ipad that mounts onto your backpack.
    Everything else is optional.

  11. #11
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    That should do me. Thanks for all the advice. While I'm sure if I carried everything mentioned, I'd have to pull a trailer, I suppose I can pick and choose, based on the length of trail and difficulty I'm facing. I did have a chain come off tonight....didn't break, just came off the derailer. No tool needed, but it made me think I might need a few extra pieces of chain, just in case. That seems like it could break very easily. I bought a pump, spare tube and tire levers this morning. I don't have the multi-tool yet, but just need to look at them and see which one I want. Thanks again for all the help. This forum has really made this process a lot easier.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cibrlx01 View Post
    What you really need is this a speaker bar connected to an ipad that mounts onto your backpack.
    Everything else is optional.
    What brand would you recommend? HAHAH

  13. #13
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    WOW... how could I forget a spare link???
    I actually carry links for 8, 9, and 10 (for my friends who don't carry one). Some folks carry extra lengths of chain (just a few links instead of the quick link).

    Derailleur hanger too! I actually don't have one for my new bike so thanks for the reminder!

    Miatagal96... hahaha
    On my very first night ride with friends (12 miler... 2.5 hrs), I wore a fanny pack.
    I also rode a horrible mtb... one of those kind that belong on paved roads only (but hey! I had front suspension... RST... hehehe).
    I stopped on the trail in the dark to answer my cellphone (I was waiting for a call from my daughter), opened up the fanny pack and didn't realize I had dumped my Prius electronic key onto the muddy ground.

    I made the call, packed back up and hit the trail to catch up (my lights were... a poor cateye for the bars, and a handlight I rigged up with a pvc "T" squeezed into an airvent of my helmet... so my lights weren't too bright- sorta like the rider!).

    After the ride, I realized I didn't have my key... a Prius won't do anything good without a key LOL.
    Borrowed a buddies car, drove 15miles home, picked up the spare key, went back for my car.

    The very next morning I was at the trailhead wondering how on earth I was going to find that little black keyfob? Then it hit me... I knew when we started the ride, and because of my cellphone, I knew when my daughter called me... so I had an approximate time of travel! SWEET! Then I saw the fresh quad tracks and worried the rider might have driven over the key pushing it into the mud, or the wheels might have thrown it off into the bush, or the rider might have seen the key and picked it up.
    I found it! And for me... the moral of the story... NO MORE FANNY PACKS!

  14. #14
    Knowledge over Swag
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    Smart keys are uber expensive too.

  15. #15
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    Seems like there's a bit of stuff to schlep along with you ... what do most folks use to carry it all?

    Not looking to ride with a backpack ... wondering if a seat bag would get in the way when coming off the back of my seat on a steep downhill ... a triangle frame bag perhaps?

    ... Any thoughts?

  16. #16
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    It all depends on how far you are riding and what sort of emergencies and trail repair you can/ want to do in lieu of a hike. My seat pack is great for holding a multitool, patch kit, CO2 inflation, cell phone, tire levers, and a spare tube (a 29er no less). In this case any nutrition goes in jersey pockets, and water is on the bike. I haven't noticed it as a problem when descending, but this may depend on several factors such as riding style, frame geo, and size of the bag. I also should admit that I only use this method on the local "beginner" trail.

    Of course, for longer outings I always use the camelbak. I have the Mule: not too big, but large enough to carry everything you'd want (3L of water, shock pump, mini pump, etc.), as well as some duplicate items (e.g. spare tube) for the gf. If I adjust the straps just right, I almost forget I'm wearing it.

    I've also got my eye on the new Crank Brothers Descender pack: a spring trip to Arizona and some gnarlier terrain has me looking for a way to pack along body armor.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ej63090 View Post
    Smart keys are uber expensive too.
    That's what I figured, although I've never priced them.
    That is also why I went right back during first light to try and find it!
    Don't understand why I'm so darn lucky sometimes

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubado View Post
    Seems like there's a bit of stuff to schlep along with you ... what do most folks use to carry it all?

    Not looking to ride with a backpack ... wondering if a seat bag would get in the way when coming off the back of my seat on a steep downhill ... a triangle frame bag perhaps?

    ... Any thoughts?
    Like Reypatito, I have a MULE also. I ride with that most times because of the places I go, and I have this 'thing' about having what I want/need when I need/want it.

    I have a larger Camelback and a couple of smaller water carriers if I wanted to go lighter.
    I don't carry so much gear if I figure either I or someone with me can drag my butt out to the car and get me to a hospital (or at least call some help in), and we're very close to town.
    That's the time I mainly carry stuff to keep my bike limping along in case something does break on it.

    I have an Ortlieb seatbags... a Micro and a Mudracer View Ortlieb Products \\ Bicycle Seat Bags at http://www.ortliebusa.com
    The Mudracer is what I keep on my mtb. The Micro goes on my road bike and SS.

    Just remember... what you carry on your person and/or bike should reflect what you are anticipating having to deal with on the trail AND what you know you can do whether it's bike mechanics or people first-aid.
    You can, and should, always set up your gear for each ride. If all you ride is the same, such that your needs are always the same, then one kit is all you need.

  19. #19
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    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

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