1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    New rider help with diagnosis.

    New rider with a question. My rear wheel does not spin "freely".... by that I mean there is a rubbing sound as it stops suddenly if you just spin the tire while holding up the rear end of the bike. I can take it to my lbs but was hoping it might be a minor fix I could do on my own.

  2. #2
    neutiquam erro
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    My first guess is that you have brake rub from the pads not being spaced properly off the rim (or rotor) in their static/open position. Do you have discs or vees? If you look carefully at your brake pads as you spin the wheel, you'll be able to see if there's contact there causing the rub.

    That would not be at all unusual for a new bike set-up after a ride or two. Your LBS can quickly get you fixed up, if you are not comfortable playing around with adjusting your brakes.

    Cheers, Chris

    EDIT: Yep, tahoeyeti shacked a good point about the wheel! If you've removed the wheel recently and put it back on, double-check that it is "seated" in the drop-outs all the way, and that your QR wheel skewer is tightend appropriately. That's a top culprit leading to what then appears to be mis-aligned brake pads. Been there, done that!
    Last edited by Chris130; 05-02-2007 at 08:30 PM.

  3. #3
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    I would guess it is your rim and/or tire rubbing on the brakes. If you watch the brake pads carefully when you spin the wheel, you should be able to tell.

    If the wheel is simply not in the bike straight, you just need to straighten it, making sure the quick release is tight enough to prevent the wheel from mis-aligning when you mash on the pedals (can't count how many times that has happened to me).

    The other possibility is that the rear wheel needs truing - that is, it is no longer "flat" when looking down at it from above, but has one or more hop in it. If this is the case, you might want to get yourself a spoke wrench and learn how to true up wheels. Its not hard at all, and a very good skill to have.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the advice, I guess I should have mentioned that I have disc brakes.

  5. #5
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    Put the bike on the ground, lean over and open the quick release, (it should open easy with one hand.

    Wiggle the bike, and press down, (you are trying to make sure that the axle is fully seated in the dropouts.

    Reclamp the quick release, easy with one hand.

    Lift the rear wheel, can you move the wheel side to side if you grab the top of it, (you checking for bearing play). If play tighten quick release a little bit.

    Spin the wheel did it help.

    Eyeball the brake and listen for the tiny telltale rub sound.

  6. #6
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    I have crappy tectro mechanical disc brakes on my bike, and I have to adjust them every few rides or so or they will rub no matter how I have the wheel in the dropouts.

    I just got used to adjusting them, so it only takes me about 2-4 minutes. They had a manual on line, but they were easy. If you bought the bike from a shop, they should bea ble to show you how to do it.
    A warning: I only post when I've been drinking, unless it is during the day when I am distracted by more important things.

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