1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    70

    new to mt. biking . . . again

    After a 5 year hiatus from riding, I decided to start again (I should have alot more free time over the summer than what I have had since college) So I pulled my bike out of storage and gave it a full tune up.

    To give you an idea of the age of my bike, it is an AMP B-3, which I believe was discontinued around '98, with shimano xt components from '97. Anyways, while giving it a tune-up, I noticed a couple of things. The barrel adjuster on my rear deraileur is stripped, and I will probably be getting a new fork for it unless I can find parts to rebuild my Mozo Pro-W.

    So my questions are this: If I recall correctly, Shimano switched to a 9 speed rear hub sometime after I purchased my bike. From my understanding, I should be able to put on a new deraileur designed for 9speed hubs without too much problems. But I am worried that the pullies may be too thin for an 8 speed chain. I was wondering what I would possible have for problems when trying to put a new one on.

    Secondly, I am completely out of touch with what is on the market now. What are some good 3.5" to 4" forks that would be recommended? I generally won't be taking any drops more than 3 feet, and I only weigh 135 lbs. But I do want quality, and don't want to get something that will perform worse than my old fork (which I loved).

    Thanks for any help you can provide me.


    Edit: also, what things should I look for that may have coroded/worn out from sitting in a storage unit for 5 years? I think I checked everything out, but I'm not positive.

  2. #2
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Have you considered replacing the bike with a modern up to date model

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    70
    I have considered it, but I can't bring myself to drop a couple grand to replace something that already works(mostly) And really, it does everything I need it to do. It is light, comfortable, and very functional. It doesn't have a lot of rear wheel travel, but it was always adequete in the past. At the time, it was a top of the line bike, and I have had no problems with it. To entirely replace it with something comparable would cost a lot more than to just fix the couple of things that are wrong with it.

  4. #4
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    In order to update to a 9 speed you will need to replace the chain & cog. The adjusting nut might just need patients to rethread back in, it possibly is backed out to far. I once spent about 30 minute of frustration to get it back in. Fork depends on how much you want to spend.
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...x+Tora+06.aspx
    You might want to upgrade the cables & housings also.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •