1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6

    New to Mountain Biking and Looking for Advice on Buying a New Bike

    Alright, so I'm new to the sport and looking to get myself a mountain bike. However, I have a budget of NO MORE than 700-800, but I would prefer to spend about 500. I have been renting a bike from school for some weekend trips (Fuji Tahoe 29er) and definitely want a hardtail 29er (I've ridden 26ers too, and I like 29ers better). I've narrowed it down to a few choices, but I'm also open to suggestions. I'm looking at the Specialized Hardrock Disc 29er ($590)/Sport Disc 29er ($700) and the Diamondback Overdrive Sport (Normally $750, but through my job I can get for $450) and the Diamondback Overdrive Comp (Same deal, I can get it for $720). Obviously, the more expensive bike should be better, but my real question is if its worth it.

    First, how do you all feel about Specialized/Diamondback bikes?

    Second, is the Specialized Sport worth the extra $110? And is the Overdrive Comp worth the extra $270? I will attach the specs for all four bikes to help you out, but I know nothing about the parts of bikes right now.

    Thanks in advance for your help, and sorry this is such a long post. Also, I'm new to the sport, so I am not sure that I would notice the difference in the parts. Just something to consider.

    Specialized Hardrock Disc 29:

    FRAME
    Specialized A1 Premium Aluminum, 29er Geometry, ORE downtube, externally relieved headtube, forged dropouts, reinforced disc mount, replaceable alloy derailleur hanger

    SWAT


    REAR SHOCK


    FORK
    SR Suntour SF13-XCT 29", coil/MCU spring, 1-1/8" steel steerer, w/ preload adj., 28mm steel stanchions, disc only lowers, 80mm travel

    HEADSET
    1-1/8" threadless, loose ball

    STEM
    Alloy, 4-bolt clamp, 10-degree rise, 25.4mm

    HANDLEBARS
    Specialized flat bar, alloy, 640mm/660mm wide, 8-degree backsweep, 4-degree upsweep, 25.4mm

    GRIPS
    Specialized Body Geometry XCT, Kraton w/ gel, 132mm

    FRONT BRAKE
    Tektro Novela, mechanical disc, dual pad angle adjustment, 160mm rotor

    REAR BRAKE
    Tektro Novela, mechanical disc, dual pad angle adjustment, 160mm rotor

    BRAKE LEVERS
    Shimano, included w/ shifter

    FRONT DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Tourney, 7-speed, 34.9mm clamp, top-swing, dual-pull

    REAR DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Altus, 8-speed, SGS Cage

    SHIFT LEVERS
    Shimano ST-EF51, 8-speed trigger, w/ integrated brake lever

    CASSETTE
    Sunrace, 8-speed, 11-34

    CHAIN
    KMC X8

    CRANKSET
    Alloy, square taper spindle

    CHAINRINGS
    42/34/24, steel

    BOTTOM BRACKET
    Square taper, cartridge bearings, 68mm shell

    PEDALS
    Composite platform, w/ reflectors, 9/16"

    RIMS
    HR Disc 29", alloy double-wall, disc, pin joint, 25mm, 36h

    FRONT HUB
    Disc, alloy, double-sealed, loose ball, steel axle, QR, 36h

    REAR HUB
    Disc, alloy, double-sealed, loose ball, steel axle, steel cassette body, QR, 36h

    SPOKES
    Stainless, 14g (2.0mm)

    FRONT TIRE
    Specialized Fast Trak Sport, 29x2.0", wire bead, 40TPI

    REAR TIRE
    Specialized Fast Trak Sport, 29x2.0", wire bead, 40TPI

    INNER TUBES
    Standard Schrader valve

    SADDLE
    Specialized Body Geometry Hardrock, steel rails, 143mm

    SEATPOST
    Alloy, 2-bolt, micro-adjust, 12.5mm offset, 30.9mm, 350mm/400mm

    SEAT BINDER
    Forged alloy, 34.9mm, QR, nylon washer

    Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc 29:


    FRAME
    Specialized A1 Premium Aluminum, 29er Geometry, fully butted alloy, ORE downtube, externally relieved headtube, forged dropouts, reinforced disc mount, replaceable alloy derailleur hanger

    SWAT


    REAR SHOCK


    FORK
    SR Suntour SF13-XCT-MLO 29", coil/MCU spring, 1-1/8" steel steerer, mechanical lockout w/ preload adj., 28mm stanchions, post-mount disc, 80mm travel

    HEADSET
    1-1/8" threadless, loose ball

    STEM
    Alloy, 4-bolt clamp, 10-degree rise, 25.4mm

    HANDLEBARS
    Specialized flat bar, alloy, 640mm/660mm wide, 8-degree backsweep, 4-degree upsweep, 25.4mm

    GRIPS
    Specialized Body Geometry XCT, Kraton w/ gel, 132mm

    FRONT BRAKE
    Tektro HD-M330, hydraulic disc, dual piston, Light Wave style rotor, 160mm rotor

    REAR BRAKE
    Tektro HD-M330, hydraulic disc, dual piston, Light Wave style rotor, 160mm rotor

    BRAKE LEVERS
    Tektro, hydraulic lever

    FRONT DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Altus, 8-speed, 34.9mm clamp, low-mount, top-swing, dual-pull

    REAR DERAILLEUR
    Shimano Acera, 9-speed, SGS Cage

    SHIFT LEVERS
    Shimano Altus, 8-speed Rapidfire Plus, SL type w/ optical display

    CASSETTE
    Sunrace, 8-speed, 11-34

    CHAIN
    KMC X8

    CRANKSET
    SR Suntour XCT, 8-speed, square taper spindle

    CHAINRINGS
    42/32/22, steel

    BOTTOM BRACKET
    Square taper, cartridge bearings, 68mm shell

    PEDALS
    Composite platform, w/ reflectors, 9/16"

    RIMS
    HR Disc 29", alloy double-wall, disc, pin joint, 25mm, 36h

    FRONT HUB
    Disc, alloy, double-sealed, loose ball, steel axle, QR, 36h

    REAR HUB
    Disc, alloy, double-sealed, loose ball, steel axle, steel cassette body, QR, 36h

    SPOKES
    Stainless, 14g (2.0mm)

    FRONT TIRE
    Specialized Fast Trak Sport, 29x2.0", wire bead, 40TPI

    REAR TIRE
    Specialized Fast Trak Sport, 29x2.0", wire bead, 40TPI

    INNER TUBES
    Standard Schrader valve

    SADDLE
    Specialized Body Geometry Hardrock, steel rails, 143mm

    SEATPOST
    Alloy, 2-bolt, micro-adjust, 12.5mm offset, 30.9mm, 350mm/400mm

    SEAT BINDER
    Forged alloy, 34.9mm, QR, nylon washer

    NOTES
    Chainstay protector, reflectors, clear coat, owner's manual



    Diamondback Overdrive Sport 29:


    Sizes 16" Small 18" Medium 20" Large 22" XLarge
    Frame Overdrive 29" Butted 6061-T6 Aluminum w/ Formed Top / Down Tube, machined headtube, forged drop outs w/replaceable hanger, disc only
    Fork SR Suntour XCR-LO 29 100mm travel, 30mm stanchions, Speed Lock, Magnesium Lower, Alloy Crown
    Rear Shock N/A
    Cranks SR Suntour XCR w/ replaceable rings, 44/32/22t
    Bottom Bracket Sealed Cartridge
    F. Derailleur Shimano Acera dual pull, top swing 34.9
    R. Derailleur Shimano Acera 8spd
    Shifter Shimano SL-M310 8spd Rapidfire
    Brake Levers Shimano BR-M395 Hydraulic
    Brakes Shimano BR-M395 Hydraulic Disc w/180mm frt / 160mm rear Rotors
    Cassette SRAM PG-820 8spd Cassette (11-32t)
    Rims 32h Diamondback SL-7 Doublewall
    Tires WTB Wolverine Comp 29x2.2
    Pedals Wellgo Alloy forged, CNC MTB
    Handlebar DB Lazer Series 31.8mm low rise
    Stem DB AL6061 Ahead 7° 31.8mm
    Seatpost DB Lazer Series Micro Adjust 30.9mm
    Seat DB Race saddle
    Headset Integrated FSA Drop-in ACB upper, Zero Stack lower internal cup and cartridge bearing, 1 1/8"
    Colors Blue
    Chain KMC-Z82
    Hubset (F) 32h SL-7 Alloy w/ CNC Disc Mount (R) 32h SL-7 Alloy Cassette w/ CNC Disc mount
    Spokes Black 14g Stainless Steel
    Grips DB4L 135mm Kraton
    Extras DB Key Chain, Owner’s manual, H20 bottle mounts, Clear Coat, 3 extra inches of wheel diameter!



    Diamondback Overdrive Comp 29:



    Sizes 16" Small 18" Medium 20" Large 22" XLarge
    Frame Overdrive 29" Butted 6061-T6 Aluminum w/ Formed Top / Down Tube, 1.5" Tapered machined headtube, forged drop outs w/replaceable hanger, disc only
    Fork Rock Shox XC 30, TK-29" w/turn key lockout, 100mm travel, ext. rebound, compression adj.
    Rear Shock N/A
    Cranks SRAM S800 for 10spd, w/ replaceable rings, 44/32/22t
    Bottom Bracket Sealed Cartridge
    F. Derailleur Shimano Deore 10spd, Low clamp, dual pull, 34.9
    R. Derailleur Shimano Deore 10spd Shadow type
    Shifter Shimano Deore 10spd Rapidfire
    Brake Levers Shimano BR-M446 Hydraulic
    Brakes Shimano BR-M445 Hydraulic Disc w/180mm frt / 160mm rear Rotors
    Cassette Shimano HG62 10spd Cassette (11-36t)
    Rims 32h Diamondback SL-7 Doublewall
    Tires WTB Wolverine Comp 29x2.2
    Pedals Wellgo Alloy forged, CNC MTB
    Handlebar DB Lazer Series 31.8mm low rise
    Stem DB 3D Forged 7° 31.8mm
    Seatpost DB Lazer Series Micro Adjust 30.9mm
    Seat DB Race saddle
    Headset FSA No.42 , Sealed ACB for Taper Headtube
    Colors Gray
    Chain Shimano HG54 10spd
    Hubset (F) 32h SL-7 Alloy w/ CNC Disc Mount (R) 32h SL-7 Alloy Cassette w/ CNC Disc mount
    Spokes Black 14g Stainless Steel
    Grips DB4L 135mm Kraton
    Extras DB Key Chain, Owner’s manual, H20 bottle mounts, Clear Coat, 3 extra inches of wheel diameter!




  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6
    Also, I'm open to suggestions, so if you have any that fit my price range I'd really appreciate your input!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    202
    The reality is in this price segment you usually get what you pay for. The opportunity to be subjective is pretty narrow. The price difference in this segment is going to be forks and if forks are the same then components...(and sometimes the name on the frame).

    The fork and components are in a different weight class on Diamondback Overdrive Comp 29. It is also, if I did not miss anything, the only one with a current drivetrain. It is a 10 speed where every thing else is an 8 speed. I don't know how to put this delicately so I am just going to say it. If you can afford it, that is the one to buy.

    You did not say where these are being sourced from, but if not a local bike shop, can you work on it yourself? That is something to consider as a new rider too.

    You may also want to check out Bikesdirect.com and Airborne if mail order is your preferred method. They have some solid offerings in that price range too.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6
    I can do at least some of the work on it myself, but probably not all of it. I spent a little bit of time in Alaska at a shop that rented bikes, and I was the only one willing to try and fix them, so I was able to teach myself quite a bit (with the help of google of course).

    All the specs were from the manufacturer's websites. If you truly think that the Comp is worth the money, then I will save up the extra money and go with that one. Do the better parts make that much of a difference?

    Also, I checked out bikesdirect.com, and they have a nearly $1000 dollar bike for just under $400. How is that possible?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,317
    It's not. Bikedirect and the others save money by not doing ads,not supporting dealers ,useing cheeper parts where you don't look. Might be the rims hubs ,headset ,bottom bracket ,bearing or frame .

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    202
    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    It's not. Bikedirect and the others save money by not doing ads,not supporting dealers ,useing cheeper parts where you don't look. Might be the rims hubs ,headset ,bottom bracket ,bearing or frame .
    Jeez......What a counterproductive post full of poor press that Bikes Direct certainly doesn't deserve. And the parts aren't cheap on some in the list above? One of them has a tourney derailleur for goodness sake. That is Wal-Mart stuff! All bikes in this price range have no name parts. Dollar for dollar Bikes Direct can't be beat. Bikes Direct does not have a dealer network as they aren't interested in you paying the rent and salaries attached to a dealer that is built into every bike that goes out the door. I don't currently own one of their bikes but have in the past and I can tell you Bikes Direct was nothing but awesome when I needed something. Guess those monthly ads in Mountain Bike Action don't count? Sure they use their own hubs, bars, and seat posts in some cases …..but go and look at Specialized or Trek and report back. I digress.....and am not going to waste any more time on this subject.

    Red_Wolf
    To answer your original question they may be a little aggressive on the comparative prices or they are talking MSRP. Take a trip to the Local Bike Shop and find out for yourself.
    The biggest argument for buying from a bike shop, in my opinion, is the support you get from a good bike shop. (LBS) I would ask you if you are going to buy all the tools you need and wrench your steed. If not, a local bike shop may be where you want to get your first bike from. I know Trek has a for fee program that not only extends the warranty but covers maintenance as well. I can only assume Specialized does as well. (But don’t know this for sure) Bikes require maintenance and work as you are flogging something, in dust and dirt, that is built as light as possible. That should weigh into your purchasing decision as well. Also, check out YouTube for maintenance and repair videos. There is lots of helpful information here to help you decide if you want to attempt your own maintenance and make the investment in the tools you will need.

    The bike mentioned above has better components.
    It also has a fork with rebound and compression settings. These adjustments help it function more like suspension and less like a pogo stick.
    It also has a 10 speed drivetrain vs. an 8 speed…which is a big deal too on a 29er. There is a reason all the high dollar bikes come with a 2x10 now.
    Shimano hydraulic brakes are awesome….even the cheap ones.

    It is for these reasons I would choose the Diamondback Overdrive Comp 29 for myself over the others listed. There are lots of bikes out there in this price range though. Studying and the decision process should be half the fun.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,317
    What I wanted to do was inform the op ,as a self stated noob he/she wouldn't know some of the facts . BD,Airborne and others don't give anything away,they are trying to sell bikes. The LBS'S are trying to sell bikes also ,but if they are doing it right they are building trust and customer satisfaction .At any given price point ,there are trade offs ,some don't mean much, others... You spend your money where you see fit .

  8. #8
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,202

    New to Mountain Biking and Looking for Advice on Buying a New Bike

    The "screaming deal" online sellers (esp Bikes Direct) are not the deal they claim to be. BD uses the old marketing trick of inflating its "compare to" numbers. You are getting exactly what you pay for from them and everyone else. BD cuts costs every way it can where it thinks customers won't notice. If you have a trained eye, you will see it. Then they provide higher quality "flashy" parts that you don't expect at that price point to make you believe you are getting the deal they claim you're getting. It is slimy and deceptive.

    Other online bike sellers don't engage in the slimy tricks (and bad website design) and oftentimes offer a more well rounded product because they cut fewer corners. And for not that much more.

    That said, I am a big fan of taking advantage of employee discounts when available and applicable. You are probably going to wind up with a better value in the end.

    I am also not a fan of bike manufacturers using drivetrain bits a couple generations old. When drivetrain parts wear out or break, it is a good time for a modest upgrade. Except when an upgrade for one part requires upgrades to the rest of the drivetrain that is fine. Say you rip a rear derailleur off on your first ride (happened to me once). If you are on 8spd, you don't have many upgrade options. If you were on 9spd, quality upgrade options still exist, though they are mostly old stock at this point. For future proofing repairs/upgrades, 10spd is where it is right now, because eventually only the cheap stuff will come in 9spd.

    That kind of thing works okay if you are making a price point bike for someone to ride around the neighborhood or on the mup with the kids or something. But to call it a mountain bike and say it's for riding hard on rugged terrain and will hold up to that use is deceptive. Tourney level components will be okay for a time, but they won't last long to hard mtb riding.

    It used to be that a solid trail worthy mtb started around $500. With inflation, that seems to be over $700 easily these days and with some brands, closer to $1,000.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: lotusdriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    482
    Can you get Voodoo bikes in the US?

    They do two models in your price range, the "Hoodoo" and the "Bizango"

    In the UK the bike press have raved about these two bikes, the "Bizango" in particular being "the best sub-1000 hardtail they have ever tested" after winning a group test of bikes twice it's price.

    It's 29" wheelsize and apparently is very well specced for the money with no weak points.
    For your $800 you get a 120mm air fork with rebound damping and 15mm through axle, plus branded parts such as Maxxis ardent tyres, Shimano Deore/Alivio drivetrain, and Shimano hydraulic disc brakes.

    I am just not sure if they are available in the US.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fat_tires_are_fun's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by Red_Wolf View Post
    I can do at least some of the work on it myself, but probably not all of it. I spent a little bit of time in Alaska at a shop that rented bikes, and I was the only one willing to try and fix them, so I was able to teach myself quite a bit (with the help of google of course).

    All the specs were from the manufacturer's websites. If you truly think that the Comp is worth the money, then I will save up the extra money and go with that one. Do the better parts make that much of a difference?

    Also, I checked out bikesdirect.com, and they have a nearly $1000 dollar bike for just under $400. How is that possible?
    A friend just bought one of the Motobecane Fantom 29 from bikesdirect. I believe its the $599 model...I have to say that the parts are impressive! A rockshox fork..mid level Shimano parts, etc. Much better outfitted than my Cannondale which cost more.
    Im sure there are some tradeoffs, but what $600 bike doesnt have some
    Also, check out the Cannondale SL4 29 and the Giant Talon 1
    2009 Salsa Fargo
    2012 Surly Pugsley
    2012 Cannondale SL4 29

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    3,690
    At your price point any bike you mention with a Suntour fork is already limited to bike paths.
    Suntour gives you the info on their site--
    RTR: Recreational trail
    Work out with your buddies: No rough terrain, no steep climbs or downhills!
    Just floating along the city river or through the forest behind your house.

    So figure in a $200 upgrade fork to the price of these models.
    Nick at Suntour has an upgrade offer to an air fork- Raidon.
    If you want to upgrade your Suntour fork

    The BD Gravity Point 1 has good Shimano 9sp Alivio/Deore drive components and Trek/Scott geo.
    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Gravity 29Point1 29er Mountain Bikes
    That's $420 delivered. Add the $200 fork.
    I would put on light grippy Nobby Nic Performance tires at $37ea.
    https://www.ebikestop.com/schwalbe_n...ing-TR4912.php
    And an SLX front brake for $60.
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano SLX M666 Disc Brake w/ Adapter

    Trail ready for the lowest price new.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by mrmas View Post
    It is for these reasons I would choose the Diamondback Overdrive Comp 29 for myself over the others listed. There are lots of bikes out there in this price range though. Studying and the decision process should be half the fun.
    Thanks mrmas, I think I'm leaning towards that one, but I am going to go to a local bike shop that sells the bikes and see what they think, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by lotusdriver View Post
    Can you get Voodoo bikes in the US?

    They do two models in your price range, the "Hoodoo" and the "Bizango"

    In the UK the bike press have raved about these two bikes, the "Bizango" in particular being "the best sub-1000 hardtail they have ever tested" after winning a group test of bikes twice it's price.

    It's 29" wheelsize and apparently is very well specced for the money with no weak points.
    For your $800 you get a 120mm air fork with rebound damping and 15mm through axle, plus branded parts such as Maxxis ardent tyres, Shimano Deore/Alivio drivetrain, and Shimano hydraulic disc brakes.

    I am just not sure if they are available in the US.
    There is nothing but frames on the US website, unfortunately.

    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    At your price point any bike you mention with a Suntour fork is already limited to bike paths.
    The DB Comp comes with the RockShox fork, and is only 270 dollars more, plus (assumably) some other upgraded parts. So far the only trails I have ridden are rated black diamonds (whatever that means), but they have been extremely rocky and rooty (I live in Virginia). I don't want my new bike to fall apart on these trails the first time I use it. Like I said, if you all really think the Comp or an 800 dollar bike is worth the money, I will go for it.

    What are your opinions on RockShox?

    I appreciate everyone's help! I'm going to head to a local bike shops so I can sit on the bikes and get their opinion on it, too. It's always helpful to know a little bit about the bikes before going in and talking to someone who is trying to sell you something.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    3,690
    The trails you mentioned will require a good fork.
    You can and should test ride everything and even some bikes outside your current budget. Ride off the parking lot surface on the grass and in and out of ditches for a little more realistic info.
    Try and figure out your size.
    RockShox forks are all trail ready. An XC 30 is a coil fork with 30mm stanchions.
    The GP1 with the fork upgrade to a Raidon air fork is a better value for the money.
    Used with a good fork may be a choice.
    A Scott Scale Elite or Trek X-Cal used could be in your range.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    67
    Have you looked at Airborne Bikes? It is another mail order company but they seem to have a better reputation. Here is a link to their Cross Country Bikes: Airborne Bicycles. Cross Country 29"

    They have a sub-forum that you use to gather more information.

    They have the Gaurdian that is listed at $599 and the Seeker ($929) that exceeds your budget by a little but is a lot of bike. If you know that you are going to stick with MTBing go ahead and make the investment and buy a better bike. You will spend a lot less in the long term and enjoy the bike more.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: lotusdriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    482
    And don't forget to check out the bike l mentioned.

    In UK magazine tests it wipes the floor with the competition, and they say that the supplied fork is good, unusual at this price.

    It even has a 15mm axle.

    Hopefully the make is available in the US.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: moefosho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,341
    In that price range I normally tell my friends to shop used. You can get a couple year old bike with top of the line components for less than $1000.
    2008 Redline Monocog 29er SS/Rigid
    2013 Marin Mount Vision XM7
    FS: 26" Black Flag Expert Wheelset (new), Reba 29 Fork

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: lotusdriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    482
    But the Voodoo l mentioned is well under $1,000 brand new and UK magazines are saying that the frame is as good as on bikes costing twice the price.
    None of the kit on it was marked down (almost unheard of at this price) and bike magazine testers are pretty ruthless!
    It has come back into stock here after being sold out all summer.
    And the OP wants a new bike.....it is always nice to have a new bike, together with the warranty etc.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,172
    Diamondback Overdrive Sport (Normally $750, but through my job I can get for $450) and the Diamondback Overdrive Comp (Same deal, I can get it for $720)
    these diamondback deals are actually really good. better than of of the other bikes you are listing. They seem to be better deals than bikesdirect and airborne from a quick glance. Those are good deals.

    you can see a parts heirarchy here.
    Is this a good deal for a First Bike?

    You can't go wrong with either. The Comp gets your equivalent fork imo, and higher end 10 speed derailleurs and cranks. Both shimano hydro brakes. They bot have the same wheelset. Both are better than specialized bikes with XCT shock, tektro hydr breaks, etc.

    I'd go with the 10 speed bike, just because deals on parts will probably be easier to replace down the line. higher resale value, etc.


    The BD Gravity Point 1 has good Shimano 9sp Alivio/Deore drive components and Trek/Scott geo.
    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Gravity 29Point1 29er Mountain Bikes
    That's $420 delivered. Add the $200 fork.
    I would put on light grippy Nobby Nic Performance tires at $37ea.
    https://www.ebikestop.com/schwalbe_n...ing-TR4912.php
    And an SLX front brake for $60.
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano SLX M666 Disc Brake w/ Adapter
    The db bikes come with xc28 and xcr forks, both a big step up from xct.
    Also, I checked out bikesdirect.com, and they have a nearly $1000 dollar bike for just under $400. How is that possible?
    Their listed price is pure marketing BS. Look at what components you get form any real pricepoint. None of their bikes can compare with the DB ones you can get. xc28 10spped deore for $720/

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by lotusdriver View Post
    But the Voodoo l mentioned is well under $1,000 brand new and UK magazines are saying that the frame is as good as on bikes costing twice the price.
    None of the kit on it was marked down (almost unheard of at this price) and bike magazine testers are pretty ruthless!
    It has come back into stock here after being sold out all summer.
    And the OP wants a new bike.....it is always nice to have a new bike, together with the warranty etc.
    The US website for the Voodoo bikes only has frames, no complete bikes. I'm not sure how to get around that other than to order from the UK website and have international shipping (probably won't save me any money in the long run). Do you know of another way around this? I'll keep an eye on their website though, see if anything changes

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FujiMatador's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    33
    I just got into Mountain biking also and I had a smaller budget to work with than you did. I went to a LBS that I had been working with the past. They were clearing out 2013 inventory to make room for the 2014 bikes and gave me a very good deal on a Fuji Nevada 29". Certainly far from a top of the line bike but more than good enough for me to start with. I don't have anywhere near the skill set to justify getting a top of the line bike. So I would suggest you stop by your LBS and talk to them about picking up something within your budget and then just start hitting the trails. If you really stick to it, in a couple of years you'll really be able to take advantage of a higher end bike.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by FujiMatador View Post
    I just got into Mountain biking also and I had a smaller budget to work with than you did. I went to a LBS that I had been working with the past. They were clearing out 2013 inventory to make room for the 2014 bikes and gave me a very good deal on a Fuji Nevada 29". Certainly far from a top of the line bike but more than good enough for me to start with. I don't have anywhere near the skill set to justify getting a top of the line bike. So I would suggest you stop by your LBS and talk to them about picking up something within your budget and then just start hitting the trails. If you really stick to it, in a couple of years you'll really be able to take advantage of a higher end bike.
    That's a good idea, too, and I have been in to talk to some of the local bike shops. But I can get a very good deal through my job, who I probably won't be employed with a whole lot longer (Moving). I think I would like to take advantage of those deals, but I will definitely still be visiting the LBS's and talking with them.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: moefosho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,341
    If you want a new bike on the cheap you can check this guy out.
    29er Mountain Bikes Up to 60% Off - MTB - Motobecane 429HT

    It is $349 when you put it in the cart. For a new mtn biker I dont think you could tell much of a difference between it, the hardrock or the DB sport. The DB Comp is much better but also much more expensive.
    2008 Redline Monocog 29er SS/Rigid
    2013 Marin Mount Vision XM7
    FS: 26" Black Flag Expert Wheelset (new), Reba 29 Fork

Similar Threads

  1. New to mountain biking, help buying 1st bike
    By djosbun in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-26-2013, 08:13 AM
  2. Replies: 31
    Last Post: 06-17-2013, 07:05 PM
  3. New To Biking Need Some Advice Buying A Bike!!
    By dangeranger in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-14-2011, 08:51 AM
  4. Mountain BIke Buying Advice
    By OnyrBike in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-16-2011, 07:41 AM
  5. Mountain bike - buying advice.
    By OnyrBike in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-15-2011, 01:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •