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  1. #1
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    New here, say'n hi. Thinking about building first bike.

    So about me. 38, 5' 11" 250lb (last year it was 330lb) Iíve decided that I no longer wanted to be fat so I have begun to change my life. I have always wanted to get into MTB, so here I am. I currently work in computers, but for the last 15 years I have been turning wrenches for a semiconductor manufacture, I like turning wrenches. With that said I want to build my first bike. I want to know EVERYTHING about my bike. Iíve been watching take off and NOS components on eBay, and I think I could save a little money and learn A LOT. What do you think?

    Tuna

  2. #2
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    Not likely to save money. Manufactures get discounts that you can't. Buy something that fits ,ride it into the ground .You will start spending money on all kinds of stuff. Watch youtube videos to learn ,or go to Park Tools and Sheldon Brown for info. Bike aren't hard to work on or repair ,there are a few things that can get tricky . Another thing to think about is the price of tools .There are things that you need to know about ,like taper headtubes vs non ,bottom brackets pressed in vs theaded ,drop out style ,seat tube diameter ,deraileur pulls top or bottom ,steerer tube lenght,fork axle diameters.

  3. #3
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Probably won't save any money. It is fun though.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  4. #4
    A God Without A Name
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    Want to build a 900 dollar bike for the low sum of 2,200 dollars? then build it.

    I have owned, tweaked, broken and replaced 4 bikes before I built my Soma. And I didn't really build it to learn how to fix it. I already knew that. What building taught me was that slapping a pile of parts together does not a perfect bike make. a lot of this is feel and preference. even if you learn the many, many different standards a part can be built in/ not be compatible with. you need to know your baseline measurements, riding style and locations and what deviations from the norm you prefer.

    For example. I ride 760mm handlebars when I have 465mm shoulders. Most would call it excessive, but it just feels right.

    Like they said above. just buy something that fits. rides decent and looks good. then tweak it/ upgrade it later.

  5. #5
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    You can save money relative to getting a new bike and still needing to spend more to put the parts on you want. This is especially true for wheels, which is often the place manufacturers cut corners. I've got two wheelsets I built and I will be building a wider carbon one soon.
    I looked at a Trek Superfly SL Elite yesterday. $5089 list on sale for $3507 including tax. I don't want the Fox Terralogic fork or the Racelite wheels or the tires or the seat or post or bars or stem. The XT components are a little better weight-wise then the SLX stuff I already found great prices for and I also have XT cassettes and shifters.
    Even selling the parts as new takeoffs I can't afford to get the frame this way for a build. They don't sell it as a frameset. Other similar options are still over $500 cheaper, like Scott and Canyon.
    You do need to know what you want.
    But that's why we're here.

  6. #6
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    Welcome to a fellow Clyde! I would recommend building your own only if you got DEEP pockets. For now just get a sturdy bike and just RIDE!! As things break(and they will) replace them. Have fun and best of luck on the weight loss
    Chances are .. You're full of !$@&?

  7. #7
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    I've built my last three bikes mainly because I love the mechanical aspect of it, and let's face it - integrating a bunch of tricked-out parts and pieces into one bad-ass finished product is just fun. None of it compares to rocket science and can all be learned rather easily, with some period of experience accumulation needed to master a few of the finer-tuning aspects. And some special tools will certainly have to be purchased. But there is something to be said for having first-hand knowledge about every component on your bike.

    However, as stated above, it's almost never a money-saving strategy. If your goal is to get the most bike for the least amount of money, building your own bike is rarely the way to go due to the advantages of economies-of-scale component buying power available to larger mtb manufacturers.

    So in a nutshell, everything in your OP is commendable and true, with the exception of saving a little money. Now it just depends on how much value you place on having fun wrenching and expanding the experience beyond just riding.

    I'll leave you with this cautionary note: Building your own bikes can be addictive.

  8. #8
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    Depends how you go about it and what you are trying to achieve. I'd be embarrassed to admit how many bikes I've built over the last 2-3 years.
    It can be cheaper in a way - you can spread the cost over a longer period of time, keep it more like pocket money instead of a major purchase.
    Most of the bikes I've built didn't start out with wheels - I swap them between bikes - thats a major savings of wheels, tires and cassette. I keep an eye out for a good deal on a rear wheel and add it later.
    Build it with a single front chain ring - save a derailleur, shifter and maybe sell the chain rings. It's the only way to get a drop bar mountain bike or a rigid bike.
    Upgrade your main bike, use the old components on the build bike.

  9. #9
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    So i ended up buying a used IronHorse Rogue from my LBS. Ill post a pic and update my profile. Thanks for all this input.

  10. #10
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    I currently ride an 08 Ventana Saltamontes with better than stock components. This bike cost nearly $4k new. I bought the frameset for $250 on ebay and all the rest of the components from cl/ebay and paid a grand total of $1500 to get this bike rolling.
    It's more bike than I can handle and is very comfortable since I spec'd the parts on it.
    I saved lots of $$$.

  11. #11
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    Congrats on the new bike! I have built my last two bikes and do it because I love turning wrenches also. I do have to agree with a lot of the other posts that you may not save much money building your own bike unless you do some shopping around and wait for the great deals. However, most of the time bikes come with cheap wheels and switching them is one of the first upgrades you make which adds to the cost of the bike. As I said I prefer to build myself because it defers the cost over a longer amount of time, I am picky with my components and, my wife doesn't get after me for dropping a big chuck change at one time.

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