1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
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    New guy looking for new bike

    Hi everyone, my name is Brian. I live in Phoenix and am in dire need of a new bike. Right now I am riding a 98 GT Ricochet, completely bone stock. I have only been riding for about 3 weeks now. Coming from BMX, I know hardly anything about whats good and what isn't on a mountain bike. I pretty much have a limit of about 350 and narrowed it down to these bikes.
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...e_500ht_xi.htm
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._cliff4300.htm
    http://bikesdirect.com/products/wind..._cliff4700.htm
    Any and all advice is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    What's wrong with the GT you are riding now?

  3. #3
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    It's old and outdated, components are starting to wear and brake. I love the frame geometry and almost decided to just upgrade the parts, but figure in the long run it would be cheaper and smarter to buy a new bike.

  4. #4
    keeping it dirty
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    I have a 2000 GT Aggressor and I love the frame/geometry so much I plan to upgrade all the components on it over time. Right now it's stock except for a tire and new fork. Next in line is pedals or disc brakes/wheelset.

  5. #5
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    How bout this one, I can probably swing this one.
    http://bikesdirect.com/products/wind..._cliff4900.htm

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by azgt83
    Hi everyone, my name is Brian. I live in Phoenix and am in dire need of a new bike. Right now I am riding a 98 GT Ricochet, completely bone stock. I have only been riding for about 3 weeks now. Coming from BMX, I know hardly anything about whats good and what isn't on a mountain bike. I pretty much have a limit of about 350 and narrowed it down to these bikes.
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...e_500ht_xi.htm
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._cliff4300.htm
    http://bikesdirect.com/products/wind..._cliff4700.htm
    Any and all advice is appreciated.

    Any chance you can hold off on your purchase until you have more money? You know, delayed gratification?

    Second question, do you know how to tune-up your own bike?

    Basically the bikes you are looking at are entry-level meaning they have heavier components and depending how much you ride, they might require a little more maintenance. Also, with mail-order bikes, you are on your own as far as adjustments go.

    If you don't know how to work on your own bike I would recommend you go buy a bike from a local bike shop. They'll adjust your bike after your first couple of rides (cables stretch and that will impact shifting performance)
    Last edited by osmarandsara; 04-15-2010 at 09:52 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by osmarandsara
    Any chance you can hold off on your purchase until you have more money? You know, delayed gratification?

    Second question, do you know how to tune-up your own bike?

    Basically the bikes you are looking at are entry-level meaning they have heavier components and depending how much you ride, they might require a little more maintenance. Also, with mail-order bikes, you are on your own as far as adjustments go.

    If you don't know how to work on your own bike I would recommend you go buy a bike from a local bike shop. They'll adjust your bike after your first couple of rides (cables stretch and that will impact shifting performance)
    Are the bikes I picked really that bad for beginner bikes? Maintenance and repair is not an issue.

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