1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    New to biking: Rockhopper or Rockhopper comp

    Hey all, I'm new to mountain biking. I'm looking at buying a bike in the $500-$700 range. I like the Specialized rockhoppers, but I'm torn between the Rockhopper ($480) and the Rockhopper Comp ($700).

    The rockhopper has Tektro V brakes, SRAM Sx-4 triggers, SRAM 3.0 front derailleur, SRAM SX-5 rear derailer, and rock shox J3 SL fork.

    The rockhopper comp has Avid SD-3 brakes, Shimano Deore SL triggers, Shimano Deore front deraileur, Shimano LX rear derailuer, and Rockshox tora 318 fork.

    Obviously there is a wide range of price ($230) between the two bikes. My buddy who is pretty knowledgable tells me the Comp is way better because of the Shimano components, and the front shock will last a lot longer than the one on the base rockhopper.

    My dillemma is that I'm not a 1-sport guy. I'm pretty much a jack-of-all trades: rock climbing, snowboarding, hiking, kayaking, fishing, and now mountain biking. I don't plan on biking 360 days out of the year, that's just not my style, and I can't afford to spend all my money on just one sport. BUT...I don't want a shitty bike...should I just suck it up and go with the Comp, or will the base 'hopper do me just fine?

    I live in Colorado and most of my biking will be done in the Rockies, if that matters.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Domestic Fowl
    Reputation: FreeRangeChicken's Avatar
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    You'll probably be happier in the long run with the rockhopper comp. Brand new on the show room you may not be able to tell much difference, but as the bike ages and components wear the better components will last longer and work better longer. All bikes require tune-ups, but cheap parts tend to wear out more quckly and need more interaction to keep running smoothly.

    You'll probably enjoy your rides more if you have better components. Buy as much bike as you can afford.

    My $0.02

    FRC

    [edit]Is a $480 bike worth it if you don't enjoy riding it?[/edit]

  3. #3
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    Especially the brakes - SD3's much better than Tektros.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

  4. #4
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
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    The comp is worth the price difference for sure, due to reasons already mentioned. Perhaps you could keep looking for something inbetween, like a closeout on an old model or something.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  5. #5
    MTB Newb
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    Go out and look for an '05 rockhopper comp, but go quick because they are selling out. And if you go in with a certain bike on your mind, dont let the salesperson sell you on something else, unless you ride it and it feels good. I just bought an '05 rockhopper for $425 and I love it. The salesmen at one bike store tried to sell me on the hardrock disc, but I am glad I waited and found the rockhopper I wanted. If I had the extra money I probably would have went with the rockhopper comp, and I am sure I would be very happy with that.

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    For as active as you are you will rpobibly find that disc brakes are worth the extra price. It's always great to take the bike with you that way you have wheels to cruise when campping or hanging out. Check out the Ibex Alpine 650 all Shimano drive train with disc brakes for $549.

    http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/ALP-650-Details.html

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