Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9

    New bike - Suuuuper front heavy (compared to last bike)

    Howdy guys,


    So it's been about 5 years since I was last on an MTB (or really any bike of any description. Totalled my last one by chest-bumping a car door at about 30km/h) but I finally managed to pick up a bargain on a Large framed, mostly stock (and in great condition) Specialized Pitch Comp from 2008. (It has Stroker Ride brakes, they switched to Juicy 3's the next year iirc).

    My previous bike was a no-name brand dually (coil, obviously) that I got from a bike shop for around $600.

    I got many many years out of that bike and was able to handle it as well as any other. Easy to pop the front wheel up, even while sitting down. Could bunny hop without needing to move too far back and everything, very responsive for flatland.

    So while my new bike feels better in just about every way, this is the one area where it really lets me down in a big way. The last owner used this for downhill and he was also about 2ft taller than me (I'm 6'2" or around 189cm give or take and depending on the time of day :P).

    I've already removed the terrible stock seat and chopped a bit off of the seat pole (it was impossible to lower due to the frame), but now I'm starting to think that I may also need a shorter stem.

    The CG of this bike seems very far forward compared to my last. I do ride trails (or at least I WILL when I'm fitter :P) but I also want to ride street and jump dirt so having a responsive front end is quite important imo.

    I need the ability to be going 45km/h and suddenly go "oh bugger, I need to hop up a gutter", which this bike currently lacks. For reference, even in a low gear, it was quite hard to get the front up into a full wheelie while staying seated.

    Are there any tips you could give me as a newbie? I don't really know much about how to equip for different styles of riding etc. I've just always had a bike and rode it how I liked without becoming one with the biking scene.

    Google searches have turned up relatively limited amounts of info, but from what I've been able to determine, a higher or shorter stem should provide at least SOME relief to the problem. Also, moving the seat back a little further should help.

    I don't mind losing a bit of pedal efficiency if it means I can snap out a quick front wheel lift using just a slight pre-load and jerk up of the handlebars.

    Obligatory pics so you have a better idea of how it's set up:

    New bike - Suuuuper front heavy (compared to last bike)-bike1.jpg

    New bike - Suuuuper front heavy (compared to last bike)-bike2.jpg


    I'm fairly certain that it's just the stock setup (Guy I bought it off said he hadn't really done anything to the bike). The stem (if stock) is a 75mm I believe + an 8 degree rise. (Whole bike specs: Specialized Bicycle Components)

    When I asked my mate at the bike store, he seemed to think the CG was fine, but then again, he rides trails and road and so that might be normal to him. To me, it's super front heavy.

    So will a shorter (like 50mm) stem significantly increase my ability to lift the front? Or would just making the handlebars higher fix it? Or is it just something that could be solved with "retraining" to bunny hop correctly etc? I never learned the "correct" way, but most of my motions were the same (except that I never needed to pre-load or push my bike forwards via the pedals).

    Sorry for the verbose first post, I wanted to include as much into that as possible to help someone else see where I'm coming from.

    Cheers in advanced!

    - Josh

    PS - Am thinking something like this:

    Zoom Stem 50mm 31 8mm 1 1 8 DH Edition Alloy White | eBay
    Last edited by WirlWind; 10-11-2014 at 11:55 PM. Reason: General formatting to make it less AHMAGARHD

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8,064
    Maybe the bike's too big for you and you're not getting your weight far enough back? Could be the suspension is too soft/damped and soaking up all your energy?

    I might sound like I know what I'm talking about but I'm just guessing. I can't bunny hop an inch! :0(

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Maybe the bike's too big for you and you're not getting your weight far enough back? Could be the suspension is too soft/damped and soaking up all your energy?

    I might sound like I know what I'm talking about but I'm just guessing. I can't bunny hop an inch! :0(

    Cheers for responding though

    In regards to the bike, I don't think I'm too large. According to the size charts I saw, I was pretty firmly into the "large" category of frames. The frame itself doesn't seem any larger and only slightly longer than my last bike (due to the angle of the front forks being wider slightly).

    I theorized that the suspension might be eating up the movement, but my mate at the LBS said he set everything up nicely for me and that it shouldn't be the issue when I serviced it (day after I bought it to check everything was sound mechanically etc).

    He put the rear shocks pressure up to match my heavier-than-average weight and also tried to tweak it (at my request) for a more flat-landy feel than for small bumps and downhill.

    The biggest difference between the two bikes that I can tell is the length of the stem and height of the handlebars. My last bike, the handlebars were maybe 2 inches higher than the rear seat and the stem was maybe 60mm. Though it also had much lighter single walled rims.

    Also, when I try to wheelie, it def is an issue of the front being too heavy. Even under pedal power, it's hard to get off the ground while remaining in the saddle. There's very little movement put into the rear shocks when trying to pedal in a low gear and using that to get the front up, when comparing to a bunny hop.

    Good god, someone stop me. I type too much -_-

  4. #4
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,738
    If anything, isn't the stem too short? That might be why it feels like the front is heavy. Can you try a slightly longer stem?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  5. #5
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,228
    You have a pretty sturdy bike there, with quite a bit of suspension travel and quite a bit of capability for smoothing the bumps. That also works the other way: damping the efects of your body language towards the bike. I think just the suspension will make it very different for hopping and wheelies, compared with your previous bike. Different rhythm, different range of movement.

    If your bike has the stock handlebar (660 mm), it is pretty small compared with what many like to use now. A longer bar might give you more leverage for wrestling the "big" bike.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8,064
    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    If anything, isn't the stem too short?
    That doesn't make sense to me. If the stem is shorter and the bars higher your weight will be further back which will surely make the front end lighter and easier to get off the ground?

    My bike is relatively short with a short rear triangle, short stem and riser bars. I also have me seat right back on the rails. The effect is to let me practically it over the back wheel when I want to. It's great on tight hairpins etc as you can lean back and just rotate the front of the bike round while hardly moving forward.

    The point being that a short stem and higher bars helps unweight the front wheel. Still can't bunnyhop but that's because I'm fat and useless! ;0)

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    104
    I've been playing around a lot with handle bar height/angle on my Specialized. I first went to 720mm wide 2" riser bars on a 100mm +/-6* stem, felt good, front end still didn't feel as I wanted it to. So then I grabbed a 90mm +35* riser stem, moved it down 10mm on my stem, and tried that for a few weeks. I kept messing around with my sweep but found I wanted the sweep further forward. I finally picked up a 40mm DH stem, 0*, and I have a far forward sweep on my bars. I moved my stem up 5mm, so I have two 5mm spacers below and two above.

    I've been riding that way for a week and a half now, and just today I was hopping back and forth going downhill over a wash out crack, probably 8 inches wide and easily clearing it.

    Where are you located?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    599
    A shorter stem with some more rise will help. You can get some more rise with a riser bar. Bar width is a different phenomena.

    My wild guess why the wheelie is harder is the rear wheel isn't under your butt like the last bike.

    Finally, are you as strong now as you were? Did some other workouts take the place of bicycling?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,462
    Quote Originally Posted by asphalt_jesus View Post
    A shorter stem with some more rise will help. You can get some more rise with a riser bar. Bar width is a different phenomena.

    My wild guess why the wheelie is harder is the rear wheel isn't under your butt like the last bike.

    Finally, are you as strong now as you were? Did some other workouts take the place of bicycling?
    I like your thinking. The answer can be simple sometimes. It's not the bike maybe it's the rider. OP said that he haven't ridden a bike for 5 years. It makes sense but of course I am guessing here.
    Last edited by Max24; 03-07-2015 at 08:06 AM.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by asphalt_jesus View Post
    A shorter stem with some more rise will help. You can get some more rise with a riser bar. Bar width is a different phenomena.

    My wild guess why the wheelie is harder is the rear wheel isn't under your butt like the last bike.

    Finally, are you as strong now as you were? Did some other workouts take the place of bicycling?
    I'm nowhere near as strong as I was 5 years back, but even 5 years ago, you could lift the front just using the lower gears and light pedalling. Wouldn't even need to use your hands beyond just balance.

    I'm assuming it's what your wild guess was - Not far enough over my back wheel. That's how it has felt to me when I've ridden it so far.



    Quote Originally Posted by shmtastic View Post
    Where are you located?
    I'm an Aussie, on the Central Coast, NSW.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    That doesn't make sense to me. If the stem is shorter and the bars higher your weight will be further back which will surely make the front end lighter and easier to get off the ground?

    My bike is relatively short with a short rear triangle, short stem and riser bars. I also have me seat right back on the rails. The effect is to let me practically it over the back wheel when I want to. It's great on tight hairpins etc as you can lean back and just rotate the front of the bike round while hardly moving forward.

    The point being that a short stem and higher bars helps unweight the front wheel. Still can't bunnyhop but that's because I'm fat and useless! ;0)
    That gives me some more data, cheers. I only managed to find 1 website that talked about CG manipulation and they also said that a shorter stem should "significantly" increase how easy it is to manipulate the front. I just wasn't sure with only a single point of reference.


    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    You have a pretty sturdy bike there, with quite a bit of suspension travel and quite a bit of capability for smoothing the bumps. That also works the other way: damping the effects of your body language towards the bike. I think just the suspension will make it very different for hopping and wheelies, compared with your previous bike. Different rhythm, different range of movement.

    If your bike has the stock handlebar (660 mm), it is pretty small compared with what many like to use now. A longer bar might give you more leverage for wrestling the "big" bike.
    As far as I've been able to find, I'm not sure the bar will help with lift, so much as it does steering. Bigger lever = less force needed to turn it + more control if you hit something.

    I know the extra travel is probably affecting my bunnyhopping, but it's set to need a fairly heavy bump before engaging the rear. When I try to wheelie from a sitting position, the suspension doesn't move (well, not to a point of noticing). I initially thought the large travel and better suspension were what was causing it, but after the tune up it doesn't seem to be the case, the front is just heavy.

    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    If anything, isn't the stem too short? That might be why it feels like the front is heavy. Can you try a slightly longer stem?
    Well I did some research yesterday and pretty much every site I visited said a shorter stem and longer bars is preferred. The only thing they didn't go into is how that affected the CG on the bike. The recommendations seemed to be 50-75mm (depending on length of torso / arms / etc) and over 700mm bars.



    My riding position is pretty good / comfy, so I'm thinking if I moved the seat back far as it will go and also get the smaller stem, it should keep my riding position fairly similar, but also move my CG back a little further.

    From what I recall of my last bike, I'm pretty sure it had a very short stem as well.

    Also, cheers for posting guys, more input is always helpful

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    284
    A shorter stem will shift the RIDER'S center of gravity toward the rear, in essence transferring weight from the front wheel to the rear wheel.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DECIM8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    195
    Seems like a bike geometry issue and you got the wrong bike to me. That bike has has a lot more bike behind you than I think you want. It should climb really well and be more stable in the downhills but it will be more difficult to manual and less "flickable". The picture from the side is very telling. Draw a like from the center of the seat straight down and it would touch the front of the rear tire. I would prefer a bike where that line hits closer to the rear hub and it sounds like this is your preference as well.

    For illustrative purposes take a look at this picture of a Yelli Screamy. Notice how much closer to the rear hub the seat is. That will make it MUCH easier to manual.
    New bike - Suuuuper front heavy (compared to last bike)-done.jpg

    Its not that a shorter stem won't help but I think you may have other issues with that bike.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by DECIM8 View Post
    Seems like a bike geometry issue and you got the wrong bike to me. That bike has has a lot more bike behind you than I think you want. It should climb really well and be more stable in the downhills but it will be more difficult to manual and less "flickable". The picture from the side is very telling. Draw a like from the center of the seat straight down and it would touch the front of the rear tire. I would prefer a bike where that line hits closer to the rear hub and it sounds like this is your preference as well.
    Everything else on the bike feels great. I think it's just a matter of bringing the seat back a little more. I should be able to get the seat closer to the Screamy you posted just by moving it back on the rails and taking the handlebars back a bit. I'd essentially keep my posture, but just be further back.

    A new stem only set me back $35 (ebay), so if it doesn't work out, I havn't lost too much and I can try to resell it (the bike) if it turns out to just not be able to be the bike I want.

    At least I can go and get a certificate from my LBS showing that it was recently serviced and in good mechanical condition.

  14. #14
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,741
    DECIM8 is right on - I though the same thing when I saw the side shot of your bike - the rear axle is way out behind you. The front end gets light the closer your weight gets to centered over it. Short chainstays is what really give a bike a light-feeling front end. A have a little 26" HT that will will pick up the front end pretty much telepathically. Super fun to ride tight twisty pumpy trails on, but can be a handful at speed and on choppy stuff. Everything is a trade-off when it comes to geometry.

    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    111
    The pitch has a really short rear end - typical of Specialized, at slightly over 420mm. The chainstay length is not an issue. The short chainstays mean that the seat tube has to be steep so that your weight doesn't get too far over the back when climbing, reducing control on the front end. This is a great thing if you're going up and down hills, but it means that you might want to slam your seat right back in the rails if you only ride on flat trails.

    The seat position looks terrible in the photo of the yelli screamy and doesn't represent what a good seat location should be. I'm not sure if it's the frame geometry or the angle of the photo. The extremely rearward seat position will help in pulling into a wheelie, but will be worse for almost everything else you'd want to do on the bike. I wouldn't enjoy riding it up a hill at all as I would lose front end grip and control, and would damage my knees eventually.
    Here's another image that better represents an ideal seat position, courtesy of the enduro superstar Jared Graves:
    Jared Graves' Prototype Long-Travel Yeti SB6C with Switch Infinity - PIT BITS - 2014 Enduro World Series Colorado Freeride Festival - Mountain Biking Pictures - Vital MTB

    On that pitch the seat position is too far forward though, and that's mainly because the seat is too low for what the frame is designed for. If that's your full climbing height, then that frame is probably a little big for you or your seat is too low.

    The pitches are very long in the front end - partially to make up for their short rear end, partially because they were specced with a fork that is too short for them, and partially because Specialized have always made big bikes for their size designation. To put this in perspective, the large pitch has a reach measurement of 480mm and has a long 70mm stem on it. The large Kona Process 153 is praised for having a long front end, and it has a reach of 460mm with a very short 40mm stem as standard.

    The bottom bracket is fairly high on the pitch, which reduces stack, which can make it harder to get over the back if there's a fit issue.

    If your shock pressures are set wrong, ie too low in the front and too high in the rear, this will make the problem worse too. Make sure your sag is correct.


    If you're a 6'2" rider you shouldn't have a problem on that frame. I'm going to say that if that's your pedalling height for your seat that it's too low for you, and I would recommend raising it and also sliding the seat back in the rails as far as you can. Getting a shorter stem will definitely help and is something you should do. 40-50mm in my opinion, and if there's any spacers above the stem then i'd move them to below the stem.

    A fork swap to a 150mm version really gets those frames going, but that's a significant cost when your current fork is working fine.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by AgrAde View Post
    On that pitch the seat position is too far forward though, and that's mainly because the seat is too low for what the frame is designed for. If that's your full climbing height, then that frame is probably a little big for you or your seat is too low.
    That's as low as the seat will go and as it is now, I can just get the balls of my feet on the ground while seated. Any higher and I'd start becoming a liability when I had to stop :P


    Quote Originally Posted by AgrAde View Post
    If you're a 6'2" rider you shouldn't have a problem on that frame. I'm going to say that if that's your pedalling height for your seat that it's too low for you, and I would recommend raising it and also sliding the seat back in the rails as far as you can. Getting a shorter stem will definitely help and is something you should do. 40-50mm in my opinion, and if there's any spacers above the stem then i'd move them to below the stem.

    A fork swap to a 150mm version really gets those frames going, but that's a significant cost when your current fork is working fine.
    I'm about to slide the seat back along the rails (and will be trying a 50mm 10 degree rise stem on Friday), but I've also considered one of those seat poles that has the bend back in it. Would you recommend one of those to bring the seat back a little further?

    I REALLY like the bike in every other way except the damn CoG.

    As for the frame, I'm starting to suspect that either this frame is MUCH larger than the average large, or it's an XL frame and the guy I got it from was mistaken. As I mentioned, in the current setup (see pic), the balls of my feet just touch the ground. I wouldn't want to go any higher.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: termhn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by WirlWind View Post
    As I mentioned, in the current setup (see pic), the balls of my feet just touch the ground. I wouldn't want to go any higher.
    The balls of your feet touching the ground shouldn't dictate your seat height... You can easily just slide forward out of the saddle when you need to stop. A good fit should leave 25-35 degrees angle in your knees when the ball of your foot is on the pedal and it is pushed all the way down. An easy way to get an approximate of this is to lean yourself/bike against a wall and sit on the saddle. Then adjust the seat up until your knees just lock when your heel is on the pedal the pedal is all the way down.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by termhn View Post
    The balls of your feet touching the ground shouldn't dictate your seat height... You can easily just slide forward out of the saddle when you need to stop. A good fit should leave 25-35 degrees angle in your knees when the ball of your foot is on the pedal and it is pushed all the way down. An easy way to get an approximate of this is to lean yourself/bike against a wall and sit on the saddle. Then adjust the seat up until your knees just lock when your heel is on the pedal the pedal is all the way down.
    I did as you suggested, but again, the seat shouldn't go much higher. When on the seat as it is currently, my leg is almost at the angle you said (I could maybe go up an inch, but I wanted the seat an inch lower for bum clearance).

    In the past, I've always had this seating height (y'know, knee almost locked out but not quite) and that's always left me able to just reach the ground with the balls of both feet, which is why I mentioned it. I guess fair enough, it would depend on the bike, but it just hasn't for me yet.

    This is where I'm at now (again, an inch lower than ideal for bunnyhop clearance, not that it's doing me much good)

    New bike - Suuuuper front heavy (compared to last bike)-20141014_164420.jpg
    (not the most flattering photo of my lower body, but meh. I'm way out of shape)

    Also, I moved the seat forward as far as the rails would allow and it helped a bit (I can actually wheelie now!) but bunnyhopping is still an exercise in futility.

    ::QUICK EDIT::

    After looking at the pic, I noticed the rear suspension is like 75mm in already, just from my weight. Is that normal? I'm about 120kg's (like 250lbs?).

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8,064
    Quote Originally Posted by WirlWind View Post
    not the most flattering photo of my lower body, but meh. I'm way out of shape
    Do you think this might be part of the reason you can't get the bike off the ground?

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Phinias's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    333
    Not that I am by any means an expert here, but for most bikes you want the balance between the wheels. If the front end comes up as easily as you remeber your last bikes did than the fit sounds off. You by no means want the Burt Reynolds / Dom Delouise Cannonball run motorcyle balance where you just wheelie everywhere as it will cause total hell trying to get up a hill of any degree of steepness. You sir, I would guess, are sufferring from the same 2 problems I am.

    1. you have a whole lot more weight than you remeber having to lift.
    2. you remeber something being far easier than it probably was, I myself was once 100' tall and bullet proof. Now my season is sidelined because of my pinkie finger....

    Fitness will be your and mine best of remedies, keep your front wheel on the ground for now and spin, spin, and spin some more, than tell us next year how much easier it is to once again wheelie it up.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8,064
    Quote Originally Posted by Phinias View Post
    You by no means want the Burt Reynolds / Dom Delouise Cannonball run motorcycle balance where you just wheelie everywhere as it will cause total hell trying to get up a hill of any degree of steepness.
    That's not been my experience. My bike feels short and my weight is far back. I don't have any problems on steep climbs because there is no limit to how much you can bend your arms and lean forward. I could lean so far forward the bike would tip me on my face if I wanted to!

    The reverse is not true. If the bike is long there is a limit to how far back you can get your weight. Once your arms are straight that's it. You might be able to stick your backside out and move your weight back further but you don't have a sufficient range of motion in that position to actually accomplish much.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Phinias View Post
    You sir, I would guess, are sufferring from the same 2 problems I am.


    1. you have a whole lot more weight than you remeber having to lift.
    2. you remeber something being far easier than it probably was, I myself was once 100' tall and bullet proof. Now my season is sidelined because of my pinkie finger....


    Fitness will be your and mine best of remedies, keep your front wheel on the ground for now and spin, spin, and spin some more, than tell us next year how much easier it is to once again wheelie it up.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Do you think this might be part of the reason you can't get the bike off the ground?
    I'm not THAT out of shape that I couldn't lift the front end :P Don't forget that "out of shape" for someone my size is still enough to pick up your average person with one arm and throw them a few meters.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    That's not been my experience. My bike feels short and my weight is far back. I don't have any problems on steep climbs because there is no limit to how much you can bend your arms and lean forward. I could lean so far forward the bike would tip me on my face if I wanted to!

    The reverse is not true. If the bike is long there is a limit to how far back you can get your weight. Once your arms are straight that's it. You might be able to stick your backside out and move your weight back further but you don't have a sufficient range of motion in that position to actually accomplish much.

    I have to agree with this. Some people are assuming I'm talking about getting the weight right over the axle so I can lift the bars with a pinkie, but that's not actually the case.

    I took my last bike down some pretty steep trails in both directions and if you distribute your weight properly, it's not much of a downside. Will you climb as stably as someone else with a further forward CG? No. But you can do almost as good while also having the ability to control the front end easily.

    I listed the Pitch up on Gumtree to gather some interest (hopefully) so if the stem doesn't help on Friday, I can at least have a head start on getting a new bike (looking instead at a X-Caliber 7. I've heard it's quite snappy and we have a local store who can fit me).

    Oh, and I realize that it's a different level of bike (and a hardtail), but it's really the only option in my price range (those ST forks on everything else are pretty terrible).

Similar Threads

  1. Is your bike too heavy?
    By Andrea138 in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-23-2013, 05:30 AM
  2. Paid Spam - Heavy Duty Bike for a Heavy Duty Person
    By iheartbicycles in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-22-2013, 01:04 PM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-27-2012, 07:59 AM
  4. Saddle Position compared to your road bike
    By Slow Eddie in forum 29er Components
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-31-2012, 09:14 PM
  5. Road bike sizing compared to mtb's
    By gsxunv04 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-29-2011, 09:33 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •